public health – Surround Health http://surroundhealth.net/ Thu, 10 Mar 2022 13:00:47 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://surroundhealth.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-68-120x120.png public health – Surround Health http://surroundhealth.net/ 32 32 PCN Pulse Roundtable: Managing Population Health, Part 1 https://surroundhealth.net/pcn-pulse-roundtable-managing-population-health-part-1/ Thu, 10 Mar 2022 13:00:47 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/pcn-pulse-roundtable-managing-population-health-part-1/ PCN Clinical Directors and Population Health Expert Join Pulse PCN Editor Victoria Vaughan on Microsoft Teams to discuss how this approach works in their field Victoria: Could you start by describing your current projects in population health? Dr Jeremy Carter, CD, Herne Bay PCN, Kent We’ve been doing it in one form or another for […]]]>

PCN Clinical Directors and Population Health Expert Join Pulse PCN Editor Victoria Vaughan on Microsoft Teams to discuss how this approach works in their field

Victoria: Could you start by describing your current projects in population health?

Dr Jeremy Carter, CD, Herne Bay PCN, Kent
We’ve been doing it in one form or another for a long time. For many years, we have investigated where we could focus our resources based on the prevalence of a disease domain, for example using a QOF registry. Now it has a different name – population health management.

The way I see it as a CD is this: we have population health management projects at the Integrated Care Partnership (ICP) or Integrated Care System (ICS) level. These are things that the system examines and which are then directed to the NCPs. The example in our region is that of patients with diabetes, a diagnosis of depression, who live in a disadvantaged area and who have three other comorbidities. So we look at a specific cohort of patients who have higher needs, identify them, and put resources around them.

This fits well with our NCP because we are working on a integrated diabetes care project for East Kent, so our NCP is driving that. We have a multidisciplinary integrated diabetes care service with practice, community and hospital diabetes teams all working collaboratively.

As CD PCN, I’m more interested in how we drive the system. We would like to do population health management from the PCN level. This is where I think we are on this learning process. Where to start ? Do you identify this from a clinical point of view in the PCN, do you look at it from the patient’s point of view, with your patient participation group (PPG), for example? Do you see it only from a data perspective? There are obviously all the different sources of data that we can access, from public health to medical, to IT tools.

So we looked at that, and we as NCPs are going to take a hybrid view with all of that. It’s here that [our work with] alcohol [misuse] entered. The public health data for our PCN shows where we stand as an outlier. But is it something that patients consider important?

And, really important, [there is the] question of funding because you want it to be achievable and deliverable. You might consider integrating into community support, alcohol support services, police, A&E services, third sector support. There are lots of things you could do, but where is the funding?

The answer is “you have ARRS roles”, and that’s true, but they already do stuff. If we’re going to start doing more work, how do we square that circle? This is where we are.

Dr Jenny Darkwah, CD, Shoreditch Park and City PCN, North East London
I approach this from three angles. In my role at GCC, we have been doing this for a long time. When we began to consider sickle cell disease as a critically ill population, we set up a board of consultants, A&E staff, patients and volunteers, to identify the needs of this population. In recent years, we have been able to involve general practitioners in the care of these patients, as very often they had gone to hospital for their care. We have set up pathways so that general practitioners can share the care of some of these patients. I think it worked very well for a given population.

In my role as CD, we sat down together as a network and looked at what we thought GPs were needed. Some problems arose – the lone male was one of them, a hidden population that doesn’t enter the statistics. We’ve set up a way to reach those men who never show up. They might be sitting at home with their diabetes or hypertension. We called on our social advisor to set up a male group isolated – a reception service where they can discuss male problems. What we’re hoping to do, in the network, is make a connection between that and our health inequalities.

So we decided to seek a patient’s perspective on what we really needed and what patients wanted from us. We therefore called on Health Watch and set up a survey of approximately 1,500 patients. From there, we set up focus groups. We are still discussing the document from the Health Watch survey and using it to inform what we do next.

One innovation that emerged from the survey was a Pap smear clinic for working women. We have a young population who work in the city and who, very often, could not go to the office. We used nurses to set up extensive access Pap smear clinics for the network.

The other thing that came out of the survey was the issue of childhood obesity and a decline in the uptake of childhood vaccinations. This was also formed from public health data and we have
a population health center looking at data across the city and Hackney. We are in discussion with Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS), voluntary sectors and schools, to jointly determine how to tackle childhood obesity. We recognize that tackling it should come from the top, with things like ads. But maybe we can also create small groups where we teach healthy eating, healthy cooking and where families eat together.

The other thing that has helped consolidate services is looking at our homeless population. When we had the recent displacement of refugees, they were brought to a few hotels in my network, so we worked with councils, MPs, mental health services, language translation services, and that brought everyone together world, just by organizing these meetings, to ensure that these people can access services in an understandable way. These are some of the projects we are looking at at the network level.

In addition, there were larger projects on long-term conditions that came from integrated care boards (ICBs). I think these are things we have been doing for a long time in general medicine. They are more established; it’s a way to ensure that we work in a way that benefits patients.

Victoria It’s a great insight into how it works in Herne Bay and Hackney. Andi, can you discuss the thinking at the NHS England level and at the analysis level?

Andi Orlowski, Director of the Health Economics Unit, Lancashire, and NHS England Senior Adviser on Population Health
I think Jeremy and Jenny were downplaying how advanced they were when it came to health management. Working with patients, the pragmatic approach to finding what matters in their population and then delivering the alcohol program [for example], is exactly one of the actions we expect to see. No one understands people better.

Jenny [gives a] wonderful example of what we’re talking about with pop health analytics – people who are well today and may be sick tomorrow, populations that are missing data, those 45-year-old men who haven’t seen their doctor GP for 20 years because they think ‘I’ll get over it, it’ll be fine’. This is a sophisticated type of analysis, this whole population approach, which includes those “well” people today. They may not be well.

Of course, making sure the funding is there for bigger and broader projects [is a key issue].

So [we ask] ‘can we have a catch-up’, and we find [a patient] is twice his previous weight, drinks too much and smokes. We [had them down] as well because of the last interaction [with them].

Working together is the real challenge for NCPs. How do they fit in? Population health management only really works if we address broader determinants, big things, but act [on them] locally. Have NCPs already attached to the community, as well as the ICS, [gives us] this system view.

We could focus on the same five elements that flow from joint strategic needs assessments. They all tend to be the same things in different orders. So it will be obesity, COPD, cardiovascular disease, depression and anxiety and another health issue depending on your area.

This system level is pushed down to say “Where is the greatest variation on your patch and what would your population respond best to?” How do these populations [in deprived areas] access to care? How do you change big things like education, green spaces, pollution, jobs, those kinds of things that go beyond the direct remit of our NCP, but are intertwined. Another super exciting thing is that Jeremy and Jenny do all the population health testing themselves. There is clearly already a lot of capacity in NCPs. How can we fund them or provide them with the resources to do the job?

Victoria What type of data are you able to provide to NCPs or is it up to them to do it themselves?

Andi NHS England has a number of tools available through the National repository of commissioning dataand there are wonderful tools like At your fingertips and others. But of course [because of information governance rules] we don’t have access to that granular primary care data that’s absolute gold dust compared to [data from] secondary user services, acute hospital data.

Now we’re trying to talk about whole populations, we need to have even more than primary care and secondary care [data]we need data from local authorities.

For example, who is on the Assisted Trash Registry? If they need help bringing their bin to the curb, they may be isolated because they are too fragile to access it. [themselves] and I don’t have a friend [help].

Many additional data are available, [but] systems, even the ICS, does not have access to [it]. What [we can get] are the tools, or additional analytical resource.

But it is also difficult for NCPs to link their data to all these additional datasets [and] become more powerful. So what NHS England has and can provide are analytical approaches and tools, but without the data we still rely on people doing their own work. It’s wonderful to see that work is being done.

Click here to read Pulse PCN’s Leading Questions interview with Andi Orlowski on population health management

Complete relevant Men’s Health CPD Modules to Pulse learning by free registrationor upgrade to a premium subscription for full access at just £89 per year.

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“Me Dieron Vida”: The effects of a pilot health promotion intervention to reduce cardiometabolic risk and improve behavioral health in older Latinos living with HIV https://surroundhealth.net/me-dieron-vida-the-effects-of-a-pilot-health-promotion-intervention-to-reduce-cardiometabolic-risk-and-improve-behavioral-health-in-older-latinos-living-with-hiv/ Thu, 10 Mar 2022 06:00:00 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/me-dieron-vida-the-effects-of-a-pilot-health-promotion-intervention-to-reduce-cardiometabolic-risk-and-improve-behavioral-health-in-older-latinos-living-with-hiv/ This article was originally published here Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2022 Feb 25;19(5):2667. doi: 10.3390/ijerph19052667. ABSTRACT There are significant knowledge gaps about the synergistic and disparate burden of health disparities associated with cardiovascular health problems, poorer mental health outcomes and suboptimal management of HIV care on health of Older Latinos Living with HIV […]]]>

This article was originally published here

Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2022 Feb 25;19(5):2667. doi: 10.3390/ijerph19052667.

ABSTRACT

There are significant knowledge gaps about the synergistic and disparate burden of health disparities associated with cardiovascular health problems, poorer mental health outcomes and suboptimal management of HIV care on health of Older Latinos Living with HIV (OLLWH). This pilot study aimed to assess the feasibility and acceptability of an innovative application of an already established health promotion intervention – Happy Older Latinos are Active (HOLA) – among this marginalized population. Eighteen self-identified Latino men with an undetectable HIV viral load and a documented risk of cardiometabolic disease participated in this study. Although the attrition rate of 22% was higher than expected, participants attended 77% of the sessions and nearly 95% of the virtual walks. Participants reported being very satisfied with the intervention, as evidenced by quantitative self-assessments (CSQ-8; M = 31, South Dakota = 1.5) and qualitative measures. Participants appreciated the connection with the community health worker and their peers to reduce social isolation. The results indicate that the HOLA intervention is an innovative way to provide a health promotion intervention tailored to meet the diverse needs and circumstances of OLLWHs, is feasible and acceptable, and has the potential to have positive health effects. of OLLWHs.

PMID:35270360 | DOI:10.3390/ijerph19052667

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UMass Center for Public Health Promotion COVID-19 Update: March 4 https://surroundhealth.net/umass-center-for-public-health-promotion-covid-19-update-march-4/ Mon, 07 Mar 2022 20:07:03 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/umass-center-for-public-health-promotion-covid-19-update-march-4/ In an email to the campus community, Ann Becker and Jeffrey Hescock, co-directors of the Public Health Promotion Center (PHPC), described a drop in the COVID-19 positivity rate on campus, the continued indoor masking requirement and the availability of a vaccination clinic. This email is as follows: Dear campus community, We continue to monitor COVID-19 […]]]>

In an email to the campus community, Ann Becker and Jeffrey Hescock, co-directors of the Public Health Promotion Center (PHPC), described a drop in the COVID-19 positivity rate on campus, the continued indoor masking requirement and the availability of a vaccination clinic.

This email is as follows:

Dear campus community,

We continue to monitor COVID-19 trends in our community through our symptomatic, adaptive and voluntary screening program as well as sewage monitoring. The latest COVID-19 testing data for the UMass community from February 23 to March 1 shows 64 new positive cases. The university’s positivity rate is 1.88%, down from 3.79% last week. The state’s seven-day positivity rate is 1.85%. Those who test positive continue to report that they have minimal to moderate symptoms of infection, and there are no hospitalizations to report.

We are very encouraged by the overall decline in the number of cases and positivity rate over the past two weeks, and will incorporate this trend into our ongoing assessments. Our inner mask requirement remains in effect.

We continue to hold COVID-19 vaccination clinics two days a week. Vaccination clinics are offered Wednesdays from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. and Thursdays from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. until March 10. Walk-ins will be accepted, but we encourage everyone to make an appointment.

Thank you for all you do to take care of yourself and each other, and to support the health of our community.

Truly,

Co-Directors of the Public Health Promotion Center (PHPC)

Ann Becker, Director of Public Health
Jeffrey Hescock, Executive Director of Environment, Health and Safety

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Can the “fantasy equation” of population health be solved? Should it be? https://surroundhealth.net/can-the-fantasy-equation-of-population-health-be-solved-should-it-be/ Thu, 03 Mar 2022 12:48:09 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/can-the-fantasy-equation-of-population-health-be-solved-should-it-be/ Let’s start at the end – the last sentence of “Understanding Population Health Terminology”, an article published by one of us, Kindig, in 2007: “The overarching question of population health is what is the optimal balance of investments (e.g., dollars, time, policies) in the multiple determinants of health (e.g., behavior, environment, socioeconomic status , medical […]]]>

Let’s start at the end – the last sentence of “Understanding Population Health Terminology”, an article published by one of us, Kindig, in 2007: “The overarching question of population health is what is the optimal balance of investments (e.g., dollars, time, policies) in the multiple determinants of health (e.g., behavior, environment, socioeconomic status , medical care) across the lifespan that will maximize overall health outcomes and minimize population-level health inequities? This is an important challenge that will require decades of academic attention. and decision makers.

This idea stems from the 1990 Evans-Stoddart population field model it has been the intellectual foundation of our field for decades. This paper and its final figure, Exhibit 1, show the evolution from the medical model presented in the health care and disease boxes on the right to the broader model with expanded concepts of outcomes and the addition of multiple determinants of health.

Exhibit 1: A field model of population health

Source: Evans RG, Stoddart GL. Produce health, consume health care. In: Why are some people healthy and others not? New York (NY): Routledge; 1994. p. 27-66.

It is certainly a complex model that one of its creators later called a “fantasy equation”, stating that “at present we only vaguely understand the relative magnitudes of the coefficients on the independent variables that would inform specific policies rather than general directions, although we are beginning to see the variables themselves more clearly. Robert Evans and Greg Stoddart rated again in 2003 that “most students of population health cannot confidently and accurately answer the question, ‘Well, where? you put the money?'” That hasn’t stopped us from calling his solution for the past 25 years here and here but with little to show for it.

One of us, Kindig, presented this conundrum to a group of students during an invited lecture for the course “Introduction to population health” of the other, Mullahy. At this point, Kindig asked, “How is this possible? It can’t be as difficult as all the modeling and equations needed to land on the moon, can it? »

Here are the answers we found on the class whiteboard.

It’s harder

It’s social science, not physics and engineering. Causality is difficult to conceptualize and, even if well conceptualized, to demonstrate empirically.

There are several results

With the significant expansion of the model beyond disease to health and function and even well-being, the number of outcomes explodes: overall mortality, morbidity, health-related quality of life, as well as disparities and inequalities in each of them. Summary measures, while sometimes useful, add complexity to the weighting components. This seemingly constant instability led one student to wonder if the “fantastic equation” exists, is it only applicable in a steady state, where the systems or process variables are immutable over time? Since we live in a dynamic state, such a fixed solution to the “fantasy equation” probably does not exist and even if it did, it might not be applicable in a decade or two.

There are several units of analysis

Another outstanding question is: what population? What is of primary concern and relevant to clinical or social policy: individuals, communities, nations, the world, marginalized groups, separately or all together?

Many, many complex empirical problems

To speak of a “solution” to the fantasy equation is in itself a fantasy. Its essential nature is that of a complex set of cause and effect relationships. For data to illuminate these relationships, not only must specific causes and outcomes have clear definitions, but those definitions must find empirical equivalents in the available data. So what follows is a litany of additional questions:

  • What are the individual and/or population health indicators of interest?
  • What specific determinants are likely to be manipulated by policy interventions? (A reminder that, as is sometimes claimed in the literature on causation, there is “No causality without manipulation. »
  • What conceivable policies can be designed or modified to bring about such manipulation?
  • How quickly do determinants and policies take effect?

The empirical task at hand is hardly simplified when one recognizes that the confusion and interactions between determinants and between policies at a given point in time and over time are almost certainly of fundamental importance. Even if such interactions could be characterized conceptually, learning them from existing data would be a formidable task.

Another student suggested that the “fantasy equation” is too complex, too fluid, and filled with too many unknowns to solve. External forces and trade-offs add additional layers of complexity, so changing one variable or coefficient will change many other variables that affect downstream results.

Data limits

We can only review what we have data on. We know a lot about Medicare since it is a massive program in the public sector. Data on other determinants is more limited and some issues such as armed violence cannot be fully understood due to policy restrictions. Additionally, in the spirit of privacy protection, various statistical agencies, such as the Census Bureau, are increasingly creating obstacles for researchers to access data at the individual level.

At the end of the discussion, the majority of students agreed that the moon landing was much less complex.

Where does that leave us?

One of the students asked, “For how long do we weigh the pros and cons and discuss how much to invest and where? How long does an idea ruminate in a think tank before it becomes relevant to the very people it aims to help? »

We refuse to accept a political scenario in which investment decisions are based on guesswork, hunches, political whims or opinions. New datasets and new analytical approaches should bring more precision, and these efforts could potentially have an impact worthy of a Nobel Prize in medicine or economics.

Despite the slow progress, we are asking the question of the optimal balance of investments more often, and answers are beginning to emerge. New disciplines are tackling the problem from a systems science perspective. Bobby Milstein and his colleagues, for example, have asked “What are the health and wellness priorities that emerge after considering the entangled threats and costs? » and found that “poverty reduction and social support were the highest ranked interventions for all outcomes in all counties. Interventions addressing smoking, substance abuse, routine care, health insurance, violent crime, and youth education also contributed significantly to some outcomes.

After this course, we contacted Gregory Stoddart and invited him to join us in writing this piece. He declined, citing his satisfactory retirement from McMaster University, but sent this e-mail message: “Although, as you know, I think the fantastic equation may be unsolvable, that does not mean that we do not know in which directions to reallocate resources. The concept of marginal returns can and should guide us here, even within rough orders of magnitude. We don’t need precision to help more people be healthy or to be more equitable.

In other words, solid estimates of directions and orders of magnitude can be just as important in serving decision-makers as precise but unreliable results. In a clinical research setting, John Mullahy and his colleagues described this challenge this way“If the massive investment in transforming discovery into health is to bear fruit, it is essential to understand when research efforts do or do not lead to full discovery. When research fails to lead to a complete discovery, the fact that it can partially identify quantities of interest is to be celebrated, not bemoaned.

That said, there remains an equally urgent step in solving the “equation” of fantasy, whether in whole or in part. It is about studying what kinds of information about these cause and effect relationships are actually useful to know. A valuable practical step in this direction would be to engage real-world decision-makers in learning what kind of information about the causes and effects of population health would be most useful in shaping policy and practice.

George Box wrote the famous that “all models are wrong, but some are useful”. The task at hand is to determine the willingness of decision-makers to exchange the “right” for the “useful”. We assume that many will tolerate a reasonable degree of vagueness. Knowing this should usefully guide the next generation of population health research on the fantasy equation.

Author’s note

We appreciate student contributions from the Fall 2021 “Introduction to Population Health” course PHS 795 University of Wisconsin Madison School of Medicine and Public Health.

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Health Promotion Coordinator position at UNIVERSITY OF MELBOURNE https://surroundhealth.net/health-promotion-coordinator-position-at-university-of-melbourne/ Wed, 02 Mar 2022 04:04:28 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/health-promotion-coordinator-position-at-university-of-melbourne/ Location: Parcville Role type: Full-time, 3-year CDD until March 2025 Department/School: Student and Academic Services Salary: UOM 8 – $108,009 – $116,906 per year plus 17% super Founded in 1853, the University of Melbourne is Australia’s No. 1 university and is consistently ranked among the top universities in the world. We are […]]]>

Location: Parcville

Role type: Full-time, 3-year CDD until March 2025

Department/School: Student and Academic Services

Salary: UOM 8 – $108,009 – $116,906 per year plus 17% super

Founded in 1853, the University of Melbourne is Australia’s No. 1 university and is consistently ranked among the top universities in the world. We are proud of our staff, our commitment to excellence in research and teaching, and our global engagement.

About Student and Scholars Services

Student and Academic Services provides student administration and services from recruitment and point of inquiry to graduation. This team also provides wellness and scholarship services to students and staff.

Wellness services is part of Student Success within Student and Academic Services. Wellness services include Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS), Health Service, Chaplaincy, and Student Equity and Disability Support (SEDS). The Health Service provides general medical, psychological and psychiatric services to students, their dependents and University staff. The Health Service provides a channel through referral to other support services within the Student Success Cluster and other health and wellness services.

About the role

As Health Promotion Coordinator, you will oversee a multi-faceted program of work covering the full spectrum of health promotion actions. You will be responsible for student engagement and participation, volunteer management, program management and evaluation, and you will also contribute to University-wide health-related governance . Based in the Health Service, you will work with a wide range of key stakeholders, including student volunteers, divisions, faculties, and external funding agencies to coordinate health promotion initiatives.

In a typical week at work, you can:

  • Develop and coordinate holistic health campaigns and programs that promote personal, social and civic development and evaluate the effectiveness of the health promotion program
  • Foster relationships with key stakeholders in divisions and faculties to enable a systematic, coordinated institution-wide approach to health promotion with clearly defined goals, targets and evaluation processes
  • Provide health promotion program support, including quarterly meetings of the Healthier University Fund Governance Group and regular meetings with Bupa Partnership representatives
  • Submit regular reports on the University’s health promotion program and its associated expenditures, including monitoring program implementation in accordance with funding guidelines and the approved program planner for the year

About you

You will be a positive and influential leader, able to communicate and collaborate effectively with a wide range of people from diverse backgrounds. You will be solution-focused, with a constant drive to improve existing processes to generate broader reach for your health promotion programs. Your attention to detail and your ability to lead and coach teams will enable you to succeed in this role.

Ideally, you will also have:

  • A master’s degree in health promotion, public health or a similar discipline with at least five years of subsequent relevant experience or an equivalent combination of experience and/or education/training
  • Demonstrated skills, knowledge, and experience in leading health promotion programs and teams, including the ability to identify and assess the health needs of the entire university student population
  • Experience delivering presentations targeting health promotion, with demonstrated knowledge of population health concerns and up-to-date industry changes and campaigns

To ensure that the University continues to provide a safe environment for all, this position requires the incumbent to hold an up-to-date and valid working with children verification.

Benefits of working with us

In addition to having the opportunity to grow and meet challenges, and to be part of a vibrant campus life, our employees enjoy a range of rewarding benefits:

  • Flexible work arrangements and generous personal, parental and cultural leaves
  • Competitive remuneration, 17% super, salary package and leave loading
  • Free and subsidized health and wellness services, and access to fitness and cultural clubs
  • Discounts on a wide range of products and services, including Myki and Qantas Club cards
  • Career development opportunities and 25% off graduate courses for staff and their immediate families

Learn more at https://about.unimelb.edu.au/careers/staff-benefits.

Be yourself

At UoM, we value the unique backgrounds, experiences and contributions each person brings to our community, and we encourage and celebrate diversity. Indigenous Australians, those who identify as LGBTQIA+, women, people of all ages and from diverse cultures are encouraged to apply for our roles. Our goal is to create a workforce that reflects the community in which we live.

Join us!

If you think this position is right for you, please apply with your resume and a cover letter outlining your interests and experience. Please note that you are not required to provide answers against the selection criteria in the job description.

If you require reasonable adjustments with the recruitment process, please contact the Talent Acquisition team at hr-talent@unimelb.edu.au.

Due to the impacts of COVID-19, we are currently prioritizing applicants with valid work rights in Australia and applicants who are not affected by travel restrictions. Please see the latest updates to Australia’s immigration and border arrangements: https://covid19.homeaffairs.gov.au/

Job Description : 0042981 Health Promotion Coordinator, PD.pdf

Closing of applications: MARCH 23, 2022 11:55 PM AUS Eastern Daylight Time

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Training the population health experts of tomorrow https://surroundhealth.net/training-the-population-health-experts-of-tomorrow/ Thu, 24 Feb 2022 07:52:55 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/training-the-population-health-experts-of-tomorrow/ Your health is one of your most valuable assets, but there are so many things that can affect it, from infectious diseases to environmental risks to social inequalities. And, as the past two years have demonstrated, our health is interconnected with others in our community and, in some cases, around the world. The field of […]]]>

Your health is one of your most valuable assets, but there are so many things that can affect it, from infectious diseases to environmental risks to social inequalities. And, as the past two years have demonstrated, our health is interconnected with others in our community and, in some cases, around the world.

The field of population health explores the factors that influence the health of individuals and communities and seeks proactive solutions to improve health and prevent disease and injury at the population level. Population health experts see the big picture. They conduct research and analyze data to better understand a specific population and their health needs. Then they bring together resources, data and information to find impactful and lasting solutions.

Simply put, land is the cornerstone of a resilient health system.

With a degree in population and health sciences, professionals are prepared to study what impacts the health of populations and innovate solutions for improvement. Luckily, getting one has never been easier. the University of Michigan – recognized as the #1 public research school in the United States – home to one of the top five School of Public Health which offers a fully online service Master of Science in Population and Health Sciences degree that can turn a passion for helping communities into a full-fledged career.

Hassan Azar found meaning and opportunity in the program even before he graduated last year and was able to apply his knowledge of public health to his current work. In fact, his job as an executive advisor to the Employer Health Innovation Roundtable never had to back down, and integrating the school into the rest of his life was easy.

“One of the best features of the program is the fact that the schedule is so flexible,” he says. “I could do the work where and when I needed it. I frequently had Zoom meetings in airport lounges or did homework in the back of Ubers. The demand has never been too much to handle.

The Master of Science in Population and Health Sciences can be completed 100% online. Source: University of Michigan

With expert guidance from an active and practicing faculty, the degree can be completed 100% virtually in just two years. Faculty at the University of Michigan School of Public Health deliver a curriculum designed to meet the emerging needs of an increasingly intersectional population health landscape by addressing public health issues. Information from various sectors –– such as academia, industry, healthcare, government and other stakeholder areas –– is integrated throughout.

Students are able to tailor their electives to their respective interests, gaining expertise that matches their goals. Upon successful completion, graduates possess expertise in existing and emerging topics in the field such as health data analytics, environmental health and sustainability, precision nutrition and more.

Dr. Sharon LR Kardia, associate dean of education and director of online degree programs at Michigan Public Health, spearheaded the creation of the degree and said the goal was always for students to gain from it. what they needed stating, “We wanted to make sure there was a solid foundation including studies in epidemiology, biostatistics, program planning, understanding of the health system, understanding of the environment and environmental risk and policy , and population health. From there, you can basically choose your own adventure. This way, students get both that depth and breadth of knowledge available to them. »

Core courses include: Principles of Public Health Epidemiology; nutrition and public health; applied biostatistics; Analysis of epidemiological data using R; Public Health and Environmental Sciences; as well as the health of the population. The six core classes are introduced in the first year of the program, followed by electives. This fundamental period helps students prepare for further study and solidify their research interests. The full range of elective courses can be found here. Master of Science students complete outside their program with a practical research project. The Capstone Project offers students the opportunity to conduct research on a public health issue of their choice, under the guidance of a faculty mentor. Through the project, students gain experience with the research process, learn to analyze and apply real-world data, and discover strategies for sharing findings with the public.

University of Michigan

Kristi Thomas, DDS, is able to apply her public health knowledge to her dental practice while continuing to learn. Source: University of Michigan

“I don’t think I could have asked for a better designed program,” says student Kristi Thomas. “It’s self-paced and there are so many resources for you. I’m able to pace myself and study in a way that fits my lifestyle, which I appreciate. instructors are awesome – there is an incredible wealth of knowledge and they are genuinely interested in our input and in helping us achieve our goals.

Connections are nurtured in abundance, despite online delivery – and not just between students and faculty. Each scheduled session involves sharing insights and gaining key insights from an illustrious network of peers. Together, they represent a wide range of booming industries. From physicians to researchers, new graduates to experienced leaders, many choose this path to apply strong population health skills to their respective career paths. In doing so, they forge lasting relationships that often result in professional partnerships. This attribute quickly piqued the interest of Alexis Mikaelian.

“I have always admired the position of the University of Michigan as a leader in many academic fields and within communities,” says the student. “However, this degree program stood out for me because of its emphasis on close student-faculty relationships and collaboration among the students themselves.” Click here to apply to the University of Michigan School of Public Health.

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UMass Center for Public Health Promotion COVID-19 Update: February 17 https://surroundhealth.net/umass-center-for-public-health-promotion-covid-19-update-february-17/ Thu, 17 Feb 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/umass-center-for-public-health-promotion-covid-19-update-february-17/ Public Health Promotion Center (PHPC) co-directors Ann Becker and Jeffrey Hescock have emailed the campus community with updates on the university’s COVID-19 positivity rate, to announce the continuation of the indoor masking policy on campus and with clinical vaccine information. This email is as follows: Dear campus community, We continue to monitor COVID-19 trends in […]]]>

Public Health Promotion Center (PHPC) co-directors Ann Becker and Jeffrey Hescock have emailed the campus community with updates on the university’s COVID-19 positivity rate, to announce the continuation of the indoor masking policy on campus and with clinical vaccine information.

This email is as follows:

Dear campus community,

We continue to monitor COVID-19 trends in our community through our symptomatic, adaptive and voluntary screening program as well as sewage monitoring. The latest COVID-19 testing data for the UMass community from February 9-15 shows 456 new positive cases. The university’s cumulative positivity rate is 7.38%, up from 7.76% last week. The state’s seven-day positivity rate is 2.90%.

Those who test positive continue to report that they have minimal to moderate symptoms of infection, and there are no hospitalizations to report. The cases mainly concern undergraduate students linked to unmasked social activities. We recognize that we remain above regional and state positivity rates, but are encouraged by the slight drop in positivity this week. Although tracking the number of cases in a highly vaccinated population has become less important for assessing campus health, it remains a valuable metric.

Throughout the pandemic, we have made our decisions based on federal and state guidelines as well as local conditions and the unique aspects of community living on a large residential campus. We are monitoring the evolution of mask-wearing guidelines and will incorporate them into our assessment of specific situations on our campus and local community. Based on current conditions, our inner mask requirement remains in effect.

In the meantime, we must continue to do what is necessary to protect our community. The UMass community is invited to come to the Campus Center Public Health Promotion Center to pick up KN95 masks and test kits each week, as we have a sufficient supply.

We also continue to hold COVID-19 vaccination clinics two days a week. Vaccination clinics are offered Wednesdays from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. and Thursdays from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. until March 10. Walk-ins will be accepted, but we encourage everyone to make an appointment.

Please continue to monitor yourself daily for symptoms of COVID-19 before coming to campus. If you don’t feel well, stay home and get tested. UHS offers symptomatic testing for students, or if you have an unobserved test kit, you can drop it off at one of the campus kiosks.

Thank you for all you do to take care of yourself and each other, and to support the health of our community.

Truly,

Co-Directors of the Public Health Promotion Center (PHPC)

Ann Becker, Director of Public Health
Jeffrey Hescock, Executive Director of Environment, Health and Safety

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Brian Silverstein, MD, Joins Innovaccer Leadership Team as Director of Population Health | Your money https://surroundhealth.net/brian-silverstein-md-joins-innovaccer-leadership-team-as-director-of-population-health-your-money/ Wed, 16 Feb 2022 14:04:14 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/brian-silverstein-md-joins-innovaccer-leadership-team-as-director-of-population-health-your-money/ SAN FRANCISCO, Feb. 16, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Innovaccer Inc.., the Health Cloud company, announced the addition of Brian Silverstein, MD, to its management team. In his new role as the company’s director of population health, Dr. Silverstein will act as a thought leader and advisor to population health management (PHM), providing strategic direction to […]]]>

SAN FRANCISCO, Feb. 16, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Innovaccer Inc.., the Health Cloud company, announced the addition of Brian Silverstein, MD, to its management team. In his new role as the company’s director of population health, Dr. Silverstein will act as a thought leader and advisor to population health management (PHM), providing strategic direction to the company. leadership team, healthcare system boards and Innovaccer customers. He will ensure the successful implementation of innovative care delivery models and population health strategies that promote high quality patient-centered care.

“The shift to value-based care is critical to bending the cost curve and improving clinical outcomes and experiences,” said Dr. Silverstein. “It’s also one of the most important use cases for digital transformation. In nearly two decades of working with healthcare systems, I’ve noticed that while there are some successes, which is holding people back is operations. I joined Innovaccer because Innovaccer Health Cloud enables rapid and cost-effective adoption of a holistic approach to PHM operations. It unifies patient data across the entire healthcare system. health, creates the workflow and management tools that enable effective population health management, and produces the executive dashboards needed for success.”

In 2010, Becker’s Hospital Review recognized Dr. Silverstein as one of the 10 people to know in the world of COAs. He served as Senior Vice President at CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield, where he implemented one of the first value-based care delivery programs. He has held leadership positions with The Chartis Group, Geisinger Consulting Group, The Camden Group and Sg2 Health Care Intelligence. Dr. Silverstein is also a faculty member and advisor to the Governance Institute and holds faculty positions with the American College of Healthcare Executives and the Thomas Jefferson School of Public Health QSLS. He serves on the editorial board of Population Health Management and serves as a system and CCO board member for OSF Healthcare.

As Director of Population Health at Innovaccer, Dr. Silverstein will work closely with healthcare leaders implementing value-based care programs that use holistic care to improve clinical, financial and financial outcomes. and operational. It will help clients understand the governance and technology changes required to move from volume-based care models to value-based care models. He will assist their teams in the implementation, operationalization and automation of these models with the Innovaccer Health Cloud Best of Ⓡ at KLAS Data Activation Platform for population health management.

“Healthcare delivery and reimbursement models continue to evolve, and healthcare system leaders need strong, highly experienced partners who can help them navigate the change,” said Abhinav Shashank, CEO of ‘Innovate. “Dr. Silverstein’s extensive experience will help our clients accelerate transformation initiatives in value-based delivery, governance, ACO strategy, clinically integrated network design, and population health management. We are excited to have him join our team and help our clients leverage data and technology to accelerate their transition to the value-based model of care.”

About Innovaccer

Innovaccer Inc., the Health Cloud Company, is a leading San Francisco-based health technology company committed to helping healthcare as a whole. InnovaccerⓇ Health Cloud unifies patient data across systems and settings, and enables healthcare organizations to rapidly develop modern, scalable applications that improve clinical, operational and financial outcomes. Innovaccer’s solutions have been deployed in more than 1,000 healthcare facilities across the United States, enabling more than 37,000 providers to transform healthcare delivery and work collaboratively with payers and life sciences companies . Innovaccer has helped organizations unify the health records of over 24 million people and generate over $600 million in savings. For more information, please visit innovaccer.com.

Press contacts:

Sachin Saxena Innovaccer Inc. sachin—saxena@innovaccer.com 415-504-3851

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Population Health and HIV PrEP https://surroundhealth.net/population-health-and-hiv-prep/ Tue, 15 Feb 2022 13:09:12 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/population-health-and-hiv-prep/ Douglas Krakower, MD: As for trying to achieve the quadruple objective of [Institute for Healthcare Improvement], there are many ways to improve both patient experience and outcomes, as well as clinician experiences, satisfaction and outcomes. I think we have to recognize that PrEP [pre-exposure prophylaxis] at the moment is relatively complicated from the point of […]]]>

Douglas Krakower, MD: As for trying to achieve the quadruple objective of [Institute for Healthcare Improvement], there are many ways to improve both patient experience and outcomes, as well as clinician experiences, satisfaction and outcomes. I think we have to recognize that PrEP [pre-exposure prophylaxis] at the moment is relatively complicated from the point of view of the medical aspects. There’s a lot of follow-up. For example, right now, for people taking oral PrEP based on CDC guidelines, which were just updated last week, the idea is to have someone come in quarterly for their adherence. , their medications and their tests. It’s really important from a safety perspective, but it’s a burden on patients and providers. I think we need to think about ways to safely demedicalize PrEP to some degree so that it is more accessible. We meet patients where they are, because people have full lives and they can be otherwise perfectly healthy, and so we don’t want to overburden them to the point that they don’t choose to continue the PrEP or initiate it in the first place.

Same thing on the clinician side. I think we need to find ways to give clinicians tools to make HIV testing, PrEP conversations, prescribing, and follow-up much easier for them and their staff. This could relieve busy clinicians of other healthcare professionals who can do much of the work with clients and patients to ease some of the burden on the clinician prescribing it. We can think of ways to use the electronic health record and automated tools to help remind clinicians of patients who may be at increased risk for HIV based on their electronic health record history. For example, if they have ever had sexually transmitted infections, this would be a way to get them thinking about talking about PrEP.

In terms of monitoring, if you have large numbers of people on PrEP in a panel of clinicians, we really need population health management tools, whether it’s staff, where they can offload with a nurse, physician assistant, or other professional who can work on following up with people after the initial prescription and making sure they have what they need in terms of laboratory care, adherence counseling, and to get their questions answered. This can really positively impact the Quadruple Aim of everyone’s experience and results.

I think we need to think about innovative ways to bring PrEP to people where they are, including dispensing it completely from the healthcare system. It’s already underway with the idea of ​​telemedicine for PrEP, or tele-PrEP, where you can have people from any jurisdiction in the country accessing PrEP centrally with virtual visits, testing home laboratory or maybe local tests, but it avoids having to take a day off for example, and come to the clinic 4 times a year. There are many ways to innovate and improve the Quadruple Aim Lenses [Institute for Healthcare Improvement].

There are a number of population health challenges in terms of who might be eligible for or taking PrEP. The first is to raise awareness about PrEP, especially in communities where rates of new HIV infections have been high, such as the southeastern United States, and where PrEP use has been lower than in other regions, and particularly among black and Latino populations. I think some of these challenges can be addressed with well-designed public health campaigns where people are made aware of PrEP in the wider community. I think there have been misconceptions that PrEP is only for certain populations. We’ve heard from research we’ve done that cisgender women have heard that PrEP is only for gay men, for example, and we know that’s not true at all. In fact, PrEP is underused among cisgender women. We need to think of ways to inform the public that this is a benefit to them so that they can access it.

I think we also need to facilitate access instead of asking people to go exclusively to health care facilities where some people are otherwise healthy and don’t see a health care provider regularly. Others may have faced stigma and discrimination or judgments from health care providers regarding sexual health care. People may not want to see clinicians for things like PrEP. So if we can think of creative ways to use community organizations to implement PrEP in the future, I think those would be ways to improve access more broadly at the population level.

Once people are using PrEP and they’re engaged, I think having access to paraprofessionals who aren’t necessarily the clinician prescribing PrEP can also improve the number of people we can support on PrEP. For example, at the hospital where I work, there is a pharmacist who has been very motivated to work with the population using PrEP in the primary care clinic. It’s a large, busy primary care clinic, and there are a number of primary care providers who prescribe PrEP to their patients. But having the pharmacist as the central person who has expertise, maybe a little more time to manage the group, and also using the electronic health record to track people, those are ways you can really scale at the population level without overburdening clients or healthcare professionals managing PrEP.

Thinking about ways to use telemedicine for PrEP is a really creative way to do it also for people who are in rural areas, or frankly, people who just prefer to do things virtually. The COVID-19 pandemic has given people the opportunity to try new ways to access and use health care. While I don’t think the entire world will be virtual in terms of healthcare, in the indefinite future there is no doubt that some people and some aspects of healthcare can be delivered more effectively and efficiently using fully telemedicine or perhaps a combined-hybrid model. PrEP, I think, is a really good way to do that.

There are already academic, public health, and private organizations that have strong tele-PrEP programs that have been running for several years now. These have not yet been studied as rigorously as I would like to know the results, but I feel from speaking to people who have engaged in them that these are excellent opportunities for scaling up PrEP at the population level to more people. Colleagues of mine here in Boston are conducting studies with colleagues in the South to see if a tele-PrEP model keeps people engaged and adherent to PrEP compared to a standard in-person model. Over the next few years, we will also learn much more about some of these innovative approaches to delivering PrEP.

In terms of programs that can help make PrEP more effective for patients and for healthcare system providers, I think having a team-based approach is a great way to approach PrEP. There’s the prescribing clinician, but there are nurses, pharmacists, physician assistants, a whole host of people on the team who may have different levels of expertise and different amounts of time.

For example, in terms of adherence counseling, research has shown that using cognitive behavioral methodologies can be really effective in helping people address adherence issues, but a primary care clinician with a broad patient panel may not have time to do this. This involves hiring nurses who may be trained in some of these methods, or behavioral health specialists, and even peer navigators who can speak at a peer level with someone using PrEP about their experiences and how they overcame challenges to access PrEP. , incorporating into their lives some of the social considerations of PrEP use in terms of disclosure to partners, peers and family. I see the future and the present, frankly, uses a team approach.

At one of the places where I work, we have an excellent nurse who basically manages the PrEP program, except for the prescription and refills, and does an excellent job. This person has acquired all the expertise as a specialist as an infectious disease nurse, and so switching to PrEP is really quite simple. She is able to handle many more patient cases than I alone. Using team-based approaches and integrating these with technology tools, such as using population health management tools from the electronic health record, are ways to escalate that more effectively. I think it has been useful to me personally in our establishment. I know I’m not always at the clinic. I do research as well as clinical care, and even the busiest clinicians have been pulled in so many directions with everything they are asked to do, so we have to unburden ourselves and work as a team to make sure that is scalable and sustainable.

Ryan Bitton, PharmD, MBA: Strategies for managing PrEP use have evolved over the years. Initially, some plans had pre-clearance, others did not. They’re at the point where there’s not a lot of pre-clearance; PrEP is a pretty standard of care recommendation. There really is no utilization management for some of the therapies. Things like generic Truvada are available without prior authorization with a $0 copayment I assume for most plans including ours. There are obviously several therapies. Some of the other therapies may have prior authorization and requirements around a generic-Truvada-first type of policy. If Generic Truvada doesn’t work, which I don’t know if we see failure in this population, Truvada failure may not be the problem, but the contraindication or intolerance or reasons for which you would not like to use generic Truvada, there are allowances to enter other therapies.

Transcript edited for clarity.

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UMass Center for Public Health Promotion COVID-19 Update: February 10 https://surroundhealth.net/umass-center-for-public-health-promotion-covid-19-update-february-10/ Thu, 10 Feb 2022 22:27:02 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/umass-center-for-public-health-promotion-covid-19-update-february-10/ In a weekly email to Public Health Promotion Center (PHPC) Campus Community Co-Directors Ann Becker and Jeffrey Hescock, address the campus’ COVID positivity rate, vaccination clinics, and availability of KN95 masks and unobserved test kits. This email is as follows: Dear campus community, As we wrap up the third week of the spring semester, we […]]]>

In a weekly email to Public Health Promotion Center (PHPC) Campus Community Co-Directors Ann Becker and Jeffrey Hescock, address the campus’ COVID positivity rate, vaccination clinics, and availability of KN95 masks and unobserved test kits.

This email is as follows:

Dear campus community,

As we wrap up the third week of the spring semester, we see campus life leading to an anticipated increase in positive COVID-19 cases. We continue to monitor COVID trends in our community through our symptomatic and adaptive testing programs and our sewage monitoring. At our highly immunized campus, these cases occur primarily in our undergraduate students who report having minimal to moderate symptoms of infection. No hospitalizations to report.

The Public Health Promotion Center (PHPC) continues to hold COVID-19 vaccination clinics two days a week at the Center on campus. This week, vaccination clinics are offered on Thursdays and Fridays from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. Starting next week, vaccination clinics will be offered on Wednesdays from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. and Thursdays from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. until March 10. Walk-ins are accepted, but we encourage everyone to make an appointment.

The latest COVID-19 testing data for the UMass community from February 2-8 shows 416 new positive cases. The university’s cumulative positivity rate is 7.45%, up from 4.48% last week. The state’s seven-day positivity rate is 4.08%. A similar increase in cases was seen at other universities at the start of the semester.

The UMass cases primarily involve undergraduates linked to unmasked social activities, based on contact tracing assessments. We must all remain vigilant by following key public health protocols in place, including our indoor mask requirement. The UMass community is invited to pick up free KN95 masks each week at PHPC at Campus Center.

The majority of positive cases are people who show symptoms of COVID and use the unobserved convenient test kit. Please continue to monitor yourself daily for symptoms of COVID-19 before coming to campus. If you don’t feel well, stay home and get tested. University Health Services offers symptomatic testing for students, or if you have an unobserved test kit, you can drop it off at one of the campus kiosks.

Thank you for all you do to take care of yourself and each other, and to support the health of our community.

Truly,

Co-Directors of the Public Health Promotion Center (PHPC)

Ann Becker, Director of Public Health
Jeffrey Hescock, Executive Director of Environment, Health and Safety

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