mental health – Surround Health http://surroundhealth.net/ Thu, 10 Mar 2022 13:00:47 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://surroundhealth.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-68-120x120.png mental health – Surround Health http://surroundhealth.net/ 32 32 PCN Pulse Roundtable: Managing Population Health, Part 1 https://surroundhealth.net/pcn-pulse-roundtable-managing-population-health-part-1/ Thu, 10 Mar 2022 13:00:47 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/pcn-pulse-roundtable-managing-population-health-part-1/ PCN Clinical Directors and Population Health Expert Join Pulse PCN Editor Victoria Vaughan on Microsoft Teams to discuss how this approach works in their field Victoria: Could you start by describing your current projects in population health? Dr Jeremy Carter, CD, Herne Bay PCN, Kent We’ve been doing it in one form or another for […]]]>

PCN Clinical Directors and Population Health Expert Join Pulse PCN Editor Victoria Vaughan on Microsoft Teams to discuss how this approach works in their field

Victoria: Could you start by describing your current projects in population health?

Dr Jeremy Carter, CD, Herne Bay PCN, Kent
We’ve been doing it in one form or another for a long time. For many years, we have investigated where we could focus our resources based on the prevalence of a disease domain, for example using a QOF registry. Now it has a different name – population health management.

The way I see it as a CD is this: we have population health management projects at the Integrated Care Partnership (ICP) or Integrated Care System (ICS) level. These are things that the system examines and which are then directed to the NCPs. The example in our region is that of patients with diabetes, a diagnosis of depression, who live in a disadvantaged area and who have three other comorbidities. So we look at a specific cohort of patients who have higher needs, identify them, and put resources around them.

This fits well with our NCP because we are working on a integrated diabetes care project for East Kent, so our NCP is driving that. We have a multidisciplinary integrated diabetes care service with practice, community and hospital diabetes teams all working collaboratively.

As CD PCN, I’m more interested in how we drive the system. We would like to do population health management from the PCN level. This is where I think we are on this learning process. Where to start ? Do you identify this from a clinical point of view in the PCN, do you look at it from the patient’s point of view, with your patient participation group (PPG), for example? Do you see it only from a data perspective? There are obviously all the different sources of data that we can access, from public health to medical, to IT tools.

So we looked at that, and we as NCPs are going to take a hybrid view with all of that. It’s here that [our work with] alcohol [misuse] entered. The public health data for our PCN shows where we stand as an outlier. But is it something that patients consider important?

And, really important, [there is the] question of funding because you want it to be achievable and deliverable. You might consider integrating into community support, alcohol support services, police, A&E services, third sector support. There are lots of things you could do, but where is the funding?

The answer is “you have ARRS roles”, and that’s true, but they already do stuff. If we’re going to start doing more work, how do we square that circle? This is where we are.

Dr Jenny Darkwah, CD, Shoreditch Park and City PCN, North East London
I approach this from three angles. In my role at GCC, we have been doing this for a long time. When we began to consider sickle cell disease as a critically ill population, we set up a board of consultants, A&E staff, patients and volunteers, to identify the needs of this population. In recent years, we have been able to involve general practitioners in the care of these patients, as very often they had gone to hospital for their care. We have set up pathways so that general practitioners can share the care of some of these patients. I think it worked very well for a given population.

In my role as CD, we sat down together as a network and looked at what we thought GPs were needed. Some problems arose – the lone male was one of them, a hidden population that doesn’t enter the statistics. We’ve set up a way to reach those men who never show up. They might be sitting at home with their diabetes or hypertension. We called on our social advisor to set up a male group isolated – a reception service where they can discuss male problems. What we’re hoping to do, in the network, is make a connection between that and our health inequalities.

So we decided to seek a patient’s perspective on what we really needed and what patients wanted from us. We therefore called on Health Watch and set up a survey of approximately 1,500 patients. From there, we set up focus groups. We are still discussing the document from the Health Watch survey and using it to inform what we do next.

One innovation that emerged from the survey was a Pap smear clinic for working women. We have a young population who work in the city and who, very often, could not go to the office. We used nurses to set up extensive access Pap smear clinics for the network.

The other thing that came out of the survey was the issue of childhood obesity and a decline in the uptake of childhood vaccinations. This was also formed from public health data and we have
a population health center looking at data across the city and Hackney. We are in discussion with Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS), voluntary sectors and schools, to jointly determine how to tackle childhood obesity. We recognize that tackling it should come from the top, with things like ads. But maybe we can also create small groups where we teach healthy eating, healthy cooking and where families eat together.

The other thing that has helped consolidate services is looking at our homeless population. When we had the recent displacement of refugees, they were brought to a few hotels in my network, so we worked with councils, MPs, mental health services, language translation services, and that brought everyone together world, just by organizing these meetings, to ensure that these people can access services in an understandable way. These are some of the projects we are looking at at the network level.

In addition, there were larger projects on long-term conditions that came from integrated care boards (ICBs). I think these are things we have been doing for a long time in general medicine. They are more established; it’s a way to ensure that we work in a way that benefits patients.

Victoria It’s a great insight into how it works in Herne Bay and Hackney. Andi, can you discuss the thinking at the NHS England level and at the analysis level?

Andi Orlowski, Director of the Health Economics Unit, Lancashire, and NHS England Senior Adviser on Population Health
I think Jeremy and Jenny were downplaying how advanced they were when it came to health management. Working with patients, the pragmatic approach to finding what matters in their population and then delivering the alcohol program [for example], is exactly one of the actions we expect to see. No one understands people better.

Jenny [gives a] wonderful example of what we’re talking about with pop health analytics – people who are well today and may be sick tomorrow, populations that are missing data, those 45-year-old men who haven’t seen their doctor GP for 20 years because they think ‘I’ll get over it, it’ll be fine’. This is a sophisticated type of analysis, this whole population approach, which includes those “well” people today. They may not be well.

Of course, making sure the funding is there for bigger and broader projects [is a key issue].

So [we ask] ‘can we have a catch-up’, and we find [a patient] is twice his previous weight, drinks too much and smokes. We [had them down] as well because of the last interaction [with them].

Working together is the real challenge for NCPs. How do they fit in? Population health management only really works if we address broader determinants, big things, but act [on them] locally. Have NCPs already attached to the community, as well as the ICS, [gives us] this system view.

We could focus on the same five elements that flow from joint strategic needs assessments. They all tend to be the same things in different orders. So it will be obesity, COPD, cardiovascular disease, depression and anxiety and another health issue depending on your area.

This system level is pushed down to say “Where is the greatest variation on your patch and what would your population respond best to?” How do these populations [in deprived areas] access to care? How do you change big things like education, green spaces, pollution, jobs, those kinds of things that go beyond the direct remit of our NCP, but are intertwined. Another super exciting thing is that Jeremy and Jenny do all the population health testing themselves. There is clearly already a lot of capacity in NCPs. How can we fund them or provide them with the resources to do the job?

Victoria What type of data are you able to provide to NCPs or is it up to them to do it themselves?

Andi NHS England has a number of tools available through the National repository of commissioning dataand there are wonderful tools like At your fingertips and others. But of course [because of information governance rules] we don’t have access to that granular primary care data that’s absolute gold dust compared to [data from] secondary user services, acute hospital data.

Now we’re trying to talk about whole populations, we need to have even more than primary care and secondary care [data]we need data from local authorities.

For example, who is on the Assisted Trash Registry? If they need help bringing their bin to the curb, they may be isolated because they are too fragile to access it. [themselves] and I don’t have a friend [help].

Many additional data are available, [but] systems, even the ICS, does not have access to [it]. What [we can get] are the tools, or additional analytical resource.

But it is also difficult for NCPs to link their data to all these additional datasets [and] become more powerful. So what NHS England has and can provide are analytical approaches and tools, but without the data we still rely on people doing their own work. It’s wonderful to see that work is being done.

Click here to read Pulse PCN’s Leading Questions interview with Andi Orlowski on population health management

Complete relevant Men’s Health CPD Modules to Pulse learning by free registrationor upgrade to a premium subscription for full access at just £89 per year.

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“Me Dieron Vida”: The effects of a pilot health promotion intervention to reduce cardiometabolic risk and improve behavioral health in older Latinos living with HIV https://surroundhealth.net/me-dieron-vida-the-effects-of-a-pilot-health-promotion-intervention-to-reduce-cardiometabolic-risk-and-improve-behavioral-health-in-older-latinos-living-with-hiv/ Thu, 10 Mar 2022 06:00:00 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/me-dieron-vida-the-effects-of-a-pilot-health-promotion-intervention-to-reduce-cardiometabolic-risk-and-improve-behavioral-health-in-older-latinos-living-with-hiv/ This article was originally published here Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2022 Feb 25;19(5):2667. doi: 10.3390/ijerph19052667. ABSTRACT There are significant knowledge gaps about the synergistic and disparate burden of health disparities associated with cardiovascular health problems, poorer mental health outcomes and suboptimal management of HIV care on health of Older Latinos Living with HIV […]]]>

This article was originally published here

Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2022 Feb 25;19(5):2667. doi: 10.3390/ijerph19052667.

ABSTRACT

There are significant knowledge gaps about the synergistic and disparate burden of health disparities associated with cardiovascular health problems, poorer mental health outcomes and suboptimal management of HIV care on health of Older Latinos Living with HIV (OLLWH). This pilot study aimed to assess the feasibility and acceptability of an innovative application of an already established health promotion intervention – Happy Older Latinos are Active (HOLA) – among this marginalized population. Eighteen self-identified Latino men with an undetectable HIV viral load and a documented risk of cardiometabolic disease participated in this study. Although the attrition rate of 22% was higher than expected, participants attended 77% of the sessions and nearly 95% of the virtual walks. Participants reported being very satisfied with the intervention, as evidenced by quantitative self-assessments (CSQ-8; M = 31, South Dakota = 1.5) and qualitative measures. Participants appreciated the connection with the community health worker and their peers to reduce social isolation. The results indicate that the HOLA intervention is an innovative way to provide a health promotion intervention tailored to meet the diverse needs and circumstances of OLLWHs, is feasible and acceptable, and has the potential to have positive health effects. of OLLWHs.

PMID:35270360 | DOI:10.3390/ijerph19052667

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Budget debate: the Ministry of Health launches targeted measures for subgroups to improve the health of the population https://surroundhealth.net/budget-debate-the-ministry-of-health-launches-targeted-measures-for-subgroups-to-improve-the-health-of-the-population/ Wed, 09 Mar 2022 09:12:01 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/budget-debate-the-ministry-of-health-launches-targeted-measures-for-subgroups-to-improve-the-health-of-the-population/ SINGAPORE – To improve overall health, the Ministry of Health (MOH) will put in place targeted measures to support and uplift various sub-groups including mothers, families, minorities and the elderly. The Straits Times looks at some of these initiatives. 1. Improve maternal health Increased support will be given to the mental well-being of women during […]]]>

SINGAPORE – To improve overall health, the Ministry of Health (MOH) will put in place targeted measures to support and uplift various sub-groups including mothers, families, minorities and the elderly.

The Straits Times looks at some of these initiatives.

1. Improve maternal health

Increased support will be given to the mental well-being of women during and after their pregnancy, as this would be crucial for the health of the child.

Minister of State for Health Janil Puthucheary told Parliament on Wednesday March 9 during his ministry’s debate that a local study, Growing Up in Singapore Towards Healthy Outcomes, found that maternal mental well-being during pregnancy could affect fetal brain development, leading to mood or anxiety disorders later in life.

The study found that about 7.2% of pregnant women had high depressive symptom scores during pregnancy. The proportion increases to 10% during the first three months postpartum.

KK Women’s and Children’s Hospital and National University Hospital will strengthen their support for the mental well-being of pregnant women and mothers by expanding accessibility to prenatal (during pregnancy) and postnatal mental health screening.

The Department of Health will also improve early intervention and support for more women who are screened as being at risk for depressive symptoms.

The Women’s Health Committee, chaired by Ms. Rahayu Mahzam, Parliamentary Secretary for Health, is planning an event on women’s health this year to raise awareness about women’s health to maximize awareness among different segments of the population. feminine. More details about the event will be shared later.

2. More support for families

Integrated health services for mothers and children will be available in 14 polyclinics over the next three years.

These health services include screening for postnatal depression and breastfeeding support when taking their child for vaccinations and child development screening at polyclinics.

Two pilot programs were launched at Punggol Polyclinic and Yishun Polyclinic in 2019, benefiting over 10,000 children and mothers.

In addition to integrating mother and child services, more holistic support for children and their families can be provided through a family support programme.

Known as Family Nexus, some health and social services can be provided under one roof at four sites in Choa Chu Kang, Punggol, Sembawang and Tampines this year.

These sites could be a polyclinic, GP clinic or social service agency office. Some programs include breastfeeding and lactation support services, body mass index and growth assessment checks for young children, and caregiver training.

3. Promote healthier lifestyles among Malay and Indian communities

To promote healthier lifestyles among these ethnic minorities, the Ministry of Health will work with Malay and Indian community leaders and partners.

A task force was formed last year by the Ministry of Health to improve the health of ethnic minority groups here. It aimed to design culturally relevant programs and help rally the community against unhealthy habits.

Giving an update on the programme, Ms Rahayu said the Health Promotion Board (HPB) has brought together experienced community leaders with the necessary expertise to form a Malay Community Outreach (MCO) task force.

There are five new sub-committees focusing on mental wellbeing, reducing smoking, improving eating habits, increasing physical activity and health screening within the Malay community, a she added.

The MCO will work with various parties to effectively expand the reach of SPB programs.

Health promotion activities for the Indian community will also be rolled out, she added.

For example, HPB has worked with key stakeholders like the Indian Development Association of Singapore to leverage culturally significant programs and events like Deepavali to strengthen healthy cooking.

HPB is also actively engaging Indian food and beverage outlets to participate in the Healthier Dining Program, which rewards customers for choosing healthy options.

She pointed out in parliament last year that in 2020, 14.4% of Malaysians and 14.2% of Indians had diabetes, compared to 8.2% of Chinese.

Additionally, 37.5% of Malaysians and 36.1% of Chinese have higher blood pressure, compared to 29.5% of Indians.

4. Support seniors to age well

To enable seniors to improve and maintain their health, a holistic program that includes physical, mental and social well-being will be developed and implemented by HPB and the People’s Association.

The program, called “Live Well, Age Well”, will be gradually rolled out across the country from May, according to a “hub and spoke” model.

It will be offered at designated community centres, residents’ corners, aged care centers and faith-based organizations, depending on the profile of residents and clients.

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Stakeholder Dialogue on Workplace Dilemmas as a Workplace Health Promotion Intervention, Including Employees with Low MS: A Reactive Evaluation | BMC Public Health https://surroundhealth.net/stakeholder-dialogue-on-workplace-dilemmas-as-a-workplace-health-promotion-intervention-including-employees-with-low-ms-a-reactive-evaluation-bmc-public-health/ Mon, 28 Feb 2022 07:50:04 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/stakeholder-dialogue-on-workplace-dilemmas-as-a-workplace-health-promotion-intervention-including-employees-with-low-ms-a-reactive-evaluation-bmc-public-health/ The results are presented in two parts, according to the research objectives. Part I describes the central themes that have been defined with the stakeholders. Part II describes desired changes before the intervention and perceived changes during and after the intervention. Part 1 – Central Themes Two relevant health-related themes stood out throughout the evaluation […]]]>

The results are presented in two parts, according to the research objectives. Part I describes the central themes that have been defined with the stakeholders. Part II describes desired changes before the intervention and perceived changes during and after the intervention.

Part 1 – Central Themes

Two relevant health-related themes stood out throughout the evaluation period: high workload and mental health.

High workload

This recurring theme has often been attributed to the unpredictable nature of the work, resulting in high peaks and understaffing. For operational employees, the high physical demands of the job (working with dangerous goods) and the mental demands of the job (multitasking, prioritizing on the spot) also contributed to a perceived high workload. According to employees, a high workload influenced health by disrupting work-life balance, working less safely, reducing job satisfaction or mental pressure from the potential consequences of mistakes and unsafe work (e.g. example, losing customers). According to supervisors, working in a less safe manner (not entirely according to safety rules) was of particular concern for young employees with little experience:

“These young boys who have just been hired, you have to tell them: man, calm down. They think: how can I do this as quickly as possible? And then they start running and flying, but you shouldn’t not do that. Because by doing that in this job, you risk your safety. They’re like oh I forgot to put my helmet on because I was too busy.—Supervisor, initial interview 1.

The consequences of errors, i.e. non-compliance with safety rules or other errors due to a perceived high workload, could be considerable. Employees seemed to have a sense of responsibility for the organization’s reputation.

“We sometimes talk about shipments of more than a hundred million. If you make a mistake because you’re mentally out of this world for a while, yes then…” … “If something happens in our factory, [name organization] will take the blame. – Operational employee, initial interview 2.

Mental Health

Employees and management have noticed an increase in the number of colleagues absent due to burnout or symptoms of stress. The Periodic Medical Assessments (EPMs) that were carried out during the project (June 2018 and April 2019), showed that employees with low MS scored below national averages on aspects of mental health such as commitment to work and superiors on burnout and stress. Masculine norms have been reported as a contributing factor to burnout. Maintaining the image of a strong worker and preferable not to show vulnerability prevented employees from speaking out at an early stage, although it was mentioned that the organization is helpful when someone is struggling mental,

“They are, after all, somewhat young guys, uh yes how do you say that politely? Hard working people, you know? That’s really what you see in the news, the Rotterdam mentality. – Supervisor, initial interview 1.

“We’re here with tough guys and it’s not cool of course to say yes, it’s not well at home or I’m not feeling well. »… « We usually see it when it’s too late. You notice people are mentally absent, and then all of a sudden they burn out. – Operational employee – reference interview 2.

Topics for Moral Case Deliberation

Based on the general themes high workload and mental health, topics for the dialogues were formulated. The researchers looked for concrete examples of the central themes articulated in the data. Topics were discussed with the contact person of the organization. Table 1 provides an overview of the topics and dilemmas each session is presented.

Table 1 Topics and dilemmas in dialogue sessions

Part 2 – Perceived Changes

Desired changes before intervention

Stakeholders were asked what they considered to be relevant changes to the intervention [20]. Respondents were interested in learnings, either unspecified (i.e. cross-pollination on how other departments deal with issues) or more specific (e.g., on how employees from other departments experienced the high workload). Additionally, employees from various departments indicated that the dialogues could help define shared experiences and/or structural issues that needed improvement. Dialogues could be a way to jointly come up with ideas for improvement for decision-makers, creating bottom-up support:

I mean, if everyone’s saying the same thing… then the organization has something to work on. – Operational employee, initial interview 6.

The leadership team also focused on learning for improvement. For example, they indicated that it was relevant for them to learn how to communicate more effectively with the ‘shop-floor’.

Perceived relevant changes after the intervention

Changes were seen at all four levels (case, individual, team, organizational). Table 2 presents an overview of all the perceived changes with a detailed description of the context showing the relevance of the changes for the stakeholders.

Table 2 Perceived changes in dialogues [ MCD = Moral Case Deliberation]

Below, one change per level is described in detail. We selected changes that were not a one-time event, such as the purchase of a means of security, but were assumed to have a longer duration (eg, perceived better mutual understanding).

Case level

Calendar setting

Some dialogues led to follow-up discussions on topics similar to those covered in the dialogue. These follow-up discussions were initiated by the organization rather than the researchers. For example, after a dialogue in which the peak workload at this time was discussed, “toolbox” sessions were organized on the experience of a high workload. During these sessions, it was discussed how to prioritize tasks and psychologically manage high workloads.

An operational employee who participated in a dialogue mentioned in the evaluation that the effort to reduce (the experience of) high workloads increased sharply directly after the dialogue. However, it was pointed out that this attention decreased after a while when the workload increased again. Nevertheless, changes occurred at other levels which were also related to the experience of high workload.

Individual level

Recognition and learning

The dialogues led to the recognition of the problems for the participants in the dialogues. Participants realized that colleagues, whether in the same department or in different departments, were experiencing similar issues, such as high workload. It was reassuring for participants from various departments to realize that their department was not the only one experiencing a high workload, but that it was a company-wide problem. Additionally, the dialogues revealed that dominant male norms like being a strong worker, preferably not showing vulnerability, prevent employees from asking for help. Participants reported that they realized during the dialogue that asking for help in times of very high workload is a legitimate thing to do. Participants also realized that it can also be helpful for other employees not participating in the dialogues to know that it is not a problem to ask for help and that this should be communicated more actively.

Team level

Perception of better mutual understanding

Participants mentioned that the sessions helped improve mutual understanding between departments. Tensions between departments, which are highly interdependent for their core business, were a contributing factor to the experience of high workloads. Participants in the dialogues indicated that they were sometimes surprised by the views of employees from other departments. Insight into their perspectives and working conditions enhanced understanding of some situations that contributed to the high workload experience. In addition, the organization has established an exchange program between departments to further enhance mutual understanding.

Organizational level

Organizational learning process

The dialogues helped management better understand the underlying factors of the central themes, high workload and mental health. From management’s point of view, there was no sign of an increase in workload; there has been no increase in customer requests. However, over the course of the project, members of the management team began to learn through the dialogues what were the underlying reasons for the perceived high workload. Understanding these reasons, such as sometimes compelling communication and tensions between departments, enabled management to take targeted action. For example, management has implemented communication training for supervisors to foster respectful and proactive employee communication to engage them more in daily practice. Other actions undertaken by the management were the establishment of an exchange program with the aim of getting to know each other’s work, initiatives aimed at strengthening the commitment of employees in organizational changes and stimulate a more preventive approach to burnout by making supervisors aware that they are the ones who can report symptoms at an early stage.

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Government has created health infrastructure in the spirit of One India One Health: PM Modi https://surroundhealth.net/government-has-created-health-infrastructure-in-the-spirit-of-one-india-one-health-pm-modi/ Sat, 26 Feb 2022 08:18:00 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/government-has-created-health-infrastructure-in-the-spirit-of-one-india-one-health-pm-modi/ Our correspondent / NEW DELHI Prime Minister Narendra Modi said the government is striving to build a health infrastructure in the country that goes beyond major cities with a One India One Health spirit. He pointed out that essential sanitation facilities will be brought to villages at block and district level. The Prime Minister said […]]]>

Our correspondent / NEW DELHI

Prime Minister Narendra Modi said the government is striving to build a health infrastructure in the country that goes beyond major cities with a One India One Health spirit.

He pointed out that essential sanitation facilities will be brought to villages at block and district level.

The Prime Minister said the government has taken a holistic approach to the health system and the focus is on health and wellbeing equally to make the country’s health care more inclusive and robust.
Addressing the webinar on the post-union budget of the Ministry of Health, Mr. Modi said that this budget expands the health system reform and transformation efforts over the past seven years.

The Prime Minister said the effort is the expansion of infrastructure and human resources related to modern medical science, the promotion of research in the Indian traditional medicine system like AYUSH and its active engagement in the health system and to provide better and affordable healthcare facilities to every person, every part of the country through modern and futuristic technology.

Mr. Modi said that this infrastructure needs to be maintained and upgraded from time to time. He said that for this, the private sector and other sectors will also have to show more energy.

The prime minister said that to strengthen the primary healthcare network, the construction of 1.5 lakh health and wellness centers is underway. He said that so far more than 85,000 centers provide facilities for routine check-ups, vaccinations and testing.

Mr Modi said that in this budget, the mental health care facility has also been added to it.

He said that the 2022-23 Union budget in the health sector focuses on three major pillars, the expansion of modern medical science infrastructure and human resources, the integration of research in modern and futuristic medicine and technology for better and affordable health care.

The Prime Minister said the health budget saw the upgrade of two lakh Anaganwadis to Saksham Aanganwadi. Mr. Modi urged the private sector to play a proactive role and respond to the operational requirements of the sector.

He said the country’s health sector should focus on becoming Aatma Nirbhar in building Indian-made healthcare targets, medicines and medical equipment. He said a quality and affordable healthcare system will evolve with the PLI program for the healthcare industry that can meet national and global demands in medicine. The Prime Minister said platforms like Cowin have shown India’s prowess in digital technology to the world. He said Ayushman Bharat Digital Mission has created a simple interface to connect consumers and healthcare providers.

Mr Modi said facilities such as telemedicine, remote health care and teleconsultation will cater to mass audiences in times of emergency.

He said India has an opportunity to show its capabilities to the world and AYUSH will play a key role in improving the health sector and meeting global demands for healthcare.

The Prime Minister hailed Indian medical professionals, who have been hailed around the world for their prowess in this sector.

Mr. Modi also praised the medical professionals involved in the sector for successfully carrying out the largest vaccination campaign in India.

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2022 brings new hope for heart health https://surroundhealth.net/2022-brings-new-hope-for-heart-health/ Wed, 02 Feb 2022 12:08:04 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/2022-brings-new-hope-for-heart-health/ American Heart Month provides a valuable opportunity for people to take stock of their cardiovascular health, says Jonathan A. Fialkow, MD, population health manager for Baptist Health. It’s also an opportunity for the medical community to drive home the basics of heart health, which it says include knowing your “dashboard” numbers, knowing your personal risk […]]]>

American Heart Month provides a valuable opportunity for people to take stock of their cardiovascular health, says Jonathan A. Fialkow, MD, population health manager for Baptist Health. It’s also an opportunity for the medical community to drive home the basics of heart health, which it says include knowing your “dashboard” numbers, knowing your personal risk factors, and taking active steps every day to maintain your cardiovascular health.

Cardiologist Jonathan A. Fialkow, MD, is associate director of the Miami Cardiac & Vascular Institute and director of population health for Baptist Health

Dr. Fialkow, a cardiologist who is also associate director of the Miami Cardiac & Vascular Institute, says there are many reasons to be encouraged about cardiovascular health today. “I think more people are now aware of their blood pressure, cholesterol and blood sugar levels, and how their numbers are in line with federal health guidelines.”

Additionally, Dr. Fialkow notes, more primary care physicians are now using coronary calcium scoring for early assessment of cardiac risk, which he says can be an excellent indicator of future cardiovascular health.

“Your calcium score is determined by a quick, simple and inexpensive chest CT scan that allows us to assess the amount of calcium in the walls of your arteries,” he explains. “With this, we can predict the cardiovascular issues you’re at risk for five or maybe 10 years and start taking steps to minimize those risks.”

Minimizing risk starts with making good — or, at least, better — decisions every day, says Dr. Fialkow, adding that diet is an easy and obvious place to start on your journey to better heart health.

“More people are now adopting low-carb diets and incorporating more plant-based foods, which is great,” says Dr. Fialkow. “I think we’re also starting to understand that it’s not so much about limiting fat in our diets as it is about avoiding all processed and refined foods. These contribute to obesity, type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure, all of which can increase your risk of heart disease.

If you’re at risk for heart disease, new technology promises to help detect a heart attack before it even happens, according to Dr. Fialkow. “Soon we may be able to implant a tiny device in the patient’s chest that will allow us to remotely monitor their vital signs 24 hours a day, whether they are at home, at work or on vacation,” he explains. -he. “If certain conditions develop, the device alerts the patient to seek help immediately and then allows us to see exactly what was going on with their heart at that time.”

expired drugs

Another reason for encouragement, says Dr. Fialkow, is that certain drugs developed to fight diabetes have been shown to significantly reduce heart disease. “We’re looking at these drugs not just in diabetic patients, but in other high-risk people, and we’re seeing very promising results.”

Additionally, Dr. Fialkow says drugs such as semaglutide help people with type 2 diabetes, who are at high risk for heart disease, lower both their weight and their blood sugar levels. “We are also looking at the effectiveness of these drugs in helping protect against heart disease in people without diabetes.”

And what about the link between cardiovascular health and stress? “I think the more we talk about it, the better,” says Dr. Fialkow. “The pandemic has brought incalculable stress and uncertainty – and, for many, incredible sadness – into our lives over the past two years. Even though the long-term effects of COVID-19 on our cardiovascular health have yet to be documented, we do know that stress itself contributes to heart disease and other conditions, and there have been many.

Dr Fialkow says taking care of yourself and your heart starts with finding a diet and exercise routine that works for you, and doing something – anything, everyday – that brings you closer to your goal. In particular, Dr. Fialkow offers these tips for staying heart healthy in 2022:

• Get checked by your doctor.

• Consider medical treatment to reduce risk, if necessary (i.e. medicines to control blood pressure, cholesterol and blood sugar).

• Start exercising and keep going – aim for 30 minutes a day, every day.

• Focus on managing stress and taking care of your mental health.

• Minimize the amount of processed or refined foods you eat and limit alcohol.

• Get a good night’s sleep: there is a clear link between sleep disorders and heart disease

• Pay attention to your body and let your doctor know if something is wrong.

Additionally, advises Dr. Fialkow, learn to recognize cardiovascular disease symptoms, which may include:

• Excessive shortness of breath with less activity

• Tightness in the chest, jaw or arm

• Shiny ankle skin and/or ankle swelling

• Shortness of breath when lying in bed

• Indigestion with activity

• General tiredness

“More than 800,000 Americans have died from COVID-19 during the pandemic, and that’s just an awful number when you think about it,” says Dr. Fialkow. “But we lose 800,000 Americans every year to cardiovascular disease, so there’s clearly more work to be done on education and screening — not just now during American Heart Month, but throughout the world. ‘year.”

Tags: American Heart Month, cardiovascular disease, cardiovascular health, heart disease, heart health, Jonathan Fialkow MD, Miami Cardiac & Vascular Institute

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Koho gets $210 million for an alternative to payday loans https://surroundhealth.net/koho-gets-210-million-for-an-alternative-to-payday-loans/ Wed, 02 Feb 2022 01:48:23 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/koho-gets-210-million-for-an-alternative-to-payday-loans/ Koho Financial, an online financial services provider, has raised $210 million in venture capital as it tries to expand its services to offer a new alternative to payday loans in Canada, The Globe and Mail reported on Tuesday. February 1st. Koho’s mobile app provides a savings account at no cost, and it has grown its […]]]>

Koho Financial, an online financial services provider, has raised $210 million in venture capital as it tries to expand its services to offer a new alternative to payday loans in Canada, The Globe and Mail reported on Tuesday. February 1st.

Koho’s mobile app provides a savings account at no cost, and it has grown its user base to over 500,000 since the pandemic. The app allows users to accumulate savings in a way that’s akin to a regular high-interest savings account, but at no cost.

Users can spend funds with a prepaid card, and the company derives its revenue from transaction fees collected from retailers. According to the report, this new funding will see Koho lean more towards loan products that can give free early access to his next paycheck, several days before payday.

Through a partnership with Automatic Data Processing (ADP), users will also be able to access up to 50% of their salary at any time, interest-free.

According to the CEO Daniel Eberhardgrowth shows there is more demand for ways to manage money and digital options for those who don’t want to go to a physical building.

“About half of Canadians are living paycheck to paycheck, waiting two weeks to get paid,” Eberhard said. “We want to be able to help individuals access the money they’ve already created and not have to turn to payday loans or go into excessive debt.”

The funding round was led by new investor Eldridge, which is a Connecticut-based holding company that invests in technology, insurance, asset management, mobility, sports and gaming, media and real estate, among other industries.

There were also commitments from returning investors TTV Capital, Drive Capital and Portage Ventures, a wing of Power Corp.’s alternative investment arm, Sagard Holdings. The round also included investments from the Healthcare of Ontario Pension Plan, Round13 and the Business Development Bank of Canada.

In other Early Paydays news, Revolut launched a partnership with UK employers to offer similar services last fall, PYMNTS reported.

Read more: Revolut Intros Payday Early Access to UK Salaries

The service, simply called “Payday”, allows employees to debit a portion of their salary as they earn it, instantly getting the funds into their accounts.

Revolut founder Nik Storonsky said the company believes in “the importance of making financial wellbeing accessible to everyone, and that includes focusing on the impact of financial stability on people’s mental health. employees”.

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NEW PYMNTS DATA: 70% OF BNPL USERS USE BANK PAYMENT OPTIONS, IF AVAILABLE

On: Seventy percent of BNPL users say they would prefer to use the installment plans offered by their banks – if only they were made available. PYMNTS’ Banking On Buy Now, Pay Later: Installment Payments and the Untapped Opportunity of FIssurveyed over 2,200 US consumers to better understand how consumers view banks as BNPL providers in a sea of ​​BNPL pure-players.

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Mental Health Promotion Week | Queen’s University Gazette https://surroundhealth.net/mental-health-promotion-week-queens-university-gazette/ Fri, 21 Jan 2022 19:23:50 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/mental-health-promotion-week-queens-university-gazette/ Mental Health Promotion Week features virtual events and initiatives to support mental health at Queen’s. During Mental Health Awareness Week, the supports and resources available to students, staff and faculty at Queen’s University are highlighted while raising awareness about mental health and stigma. Queen’s University’s annual Mental Health Week is an opportunity to reflect on […]]]>

Mental Health Promotion Week features virtual events and initiatives to support mental health at Queen’s.

During Mental Health Awareness Week, the supports and resources available to students, staff and faculty at Queen’s University are highlighted while raising awareness about mental health and stigma.

Queen’s University’s annual Mental Health Week is an opportunity to reflect on personal mental health and work towards building a community of care. Designed to surround Bell Let’s Talk Day (January 26), Mental Health Awareness Week aims to address the stigma associated with mental illness while raising awareness of the supports and resources available to students, staff and the teachers. The week-long event runs from January 24-28 with various initiatives aimed at increasing social connections and improving emotional, physical and mental health.

Our goal is to highlight some of the incredible mental health promotion efforts at Queen’s, especially the work done by student leaders and student staff,” says Kate Humphrys, Health Promotion Coordinator, Student Wellness Services (SWS).We hope this week will help keep the conversation going on this crucial topic throughout the year.

Post-secondary education can be a stressful time for students, especially with changes to learning formats and public health guidelines. As the university enters its third year of the COVID-19 pandemic, mental health education and advocacy continues to be an important priority at Queen’s. Encouraging open, respectful and inclusive conversations, Mental Health Promotion Week is about feeling connected even in times of social distancing and remote learning.

“We know that mental health is essential to our overall well-being and sometimes we can focus on the self-care activities that help maintain good mental health, but other times it may not be enough,” says Beth Blackett, Special Health Promotion Projects, Student Welfare Services When someone is struggling, they often need a community of care that can help them find the supports and resources they need. Mental Health Awareness Week helps highlight some of these supports and reminds everyone that it’s okay to talk about mental health, to reach out when we need help and , above all, to support each other.

Working to create an environment where everyone feels safe and accepted is paramount to ensuring everyone can achieve their full potential as healthy, resilient and inspired members of the Queen’s community. Recognizing the intersectionality between mental health and other areas of wellness, Student Wellness Services, along with various student-run groups and departments on campus, have created a number of virtual challenges, of events and workshops designed to stimulate discussion and social engagement.

Events and Initiatives

  • This year, in collaboration with the Queen’s Student Mental Health Network, the Campus Wellness Project will announce candidates for Classroom Champions for Mental Health. Class Champions recognize teachers, instructors and teaching assistants who create learning environments where student mental health is valued and supported.
  • Take part in the Get Active challenge by signing up for a virtual fitness class at ARC, hosted by Athletics and Recreation.
  • Participate in the Rest & Relax Challenge by booking a peer wellness coaching session or healthy lifestyle professional appointment to learn strategies to improve sleep habits. Attend a workshop on how to create a personalized self-care plan by sharing evidence-based strategies for managing stress, or learn how to support someone in difficulty by signing up for an identify and respond seminar students in distress or in crisis. Find your safe space through trauma-informed writing exercises and guided mediation.
  • Grab your paper and writing utensils and create beautiful affirmation art with Queen’s Sexual Violence Prevention and Response Services. Connect with members of the LGBQT community by participating in Queer Survival Discussions, hosted in conjunction with Sexual Assault Center Kingston. Finding Your Joy Through Music encourages BIPOC students to come together and share their favorite songs from their playlist. Take a professionally led mindfulness session to visualize and promote positive personal growth.
  • Visit the virtual photo booth available on Bell Let’s Talk Day and take part in a digital scavenger hunt focusing on BIPOC resources. Visit any of the various in-person locations on campus to pick up Bell merchandise, including toques and bubble wrap. Go online and download the Bell Let’s Talk Toolkit and see how you can support mental health more.
  • Feed yourself by signing up and picking up a free fresh food box with all the key produce and ingredients needed to make a healthy meal, or check out the Food Access Resource website for more tips on where to find healthy, affordable food . Take part in Stories Spark Change with conversations with internationally acclaimed author Roxane Gay and bestselling author Eternity Martis about healing and sexual violence.
  • Embrace nature by exploring the outdoors in the Get Outside challenge.

Learn more about the virtual events offered on campus on the Mental Health Promotion Week webpage. Events will continue to be added throughout the week.

Additional Resources

Queen’s students can access support from the AMS Peer Support Center and the Student Wellness Services Mental Health Services website. Additional resources include Empower Me, a 24/7 phone service that connects students with qualified counselors, consultants, and life coaches for a variety of issues, and TAO (Therapy Assistance Online), an online, mobile-friendly library of wellness-promoting pathways.

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COVID-19 Pandemic and Unique Approach to Health: Learning from Mankind’s Past Mistakes – The European Sting – Critical News & Insights on European Politics, Economy, Foreign Affairs, Business & Technology https://surroundhealth.net/covid-19-pandemic-and-unique-approach-to-health-learning-from-mankinds-past-mistakes-the-european-sting-critical-news-insights-on-european-politics-economy-foreign-affairs-business-techno/ Tue, 14 Dec 2021 07:54:52 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/covid-19-pandemic-and-unique-approach-to-health-learning-from-mankinds-past-mistakes-the-european-sting-critical-news-insights-on-european-politics-economy-foreign-affairs-business-techno/ [ad_1] (Credit: Unsplash) This article was exclusively written for The European Sting by Mr. Liber Ramírez Bustamante, a medical student currently one year away from graduating from the National School of Medicine and Homeopathy in Mexico City. It is affiliated with the International Federation of Medical Students’ Associations (IFMSA), a cordial partner of The Sting. […]]]>


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(Credit: Unsplash)

This article was exclusively written for The European Sting by Mr. Liber Ramírez Bustamante, a medical student currently one year away from graduating from the National School of Medicine and Homeopathy in Mexico City. It is affiliated with the International Federation of Medical Students’ Associations (IFMSA), a cordial partner of The Sting. The opinions expressed in this article are strictly the author’s and do not necessarily reflect the views of IFMSA on the subject, nor of The European Sting.


November 9, 2015 Menachery et al published ” Circulating SARS-like Bat Coronavirus Cluster Shows Potential for Human Emergence ” on Nature, a publication that was used to suggest that the COVID-19 pandemic started as a bat-to-human zoonosis. Indeed, on March 30, 2020, the authors did not hesitate to report that they were aware that their article was being used to advance the idea that SARS-CoV-2 would be a product of human invention by genetic modification. , and that there is no real evidence to support this theory; instead, they stand firm on the information they’ve gathered through their expertise – scientists believe an animal is most likely the source of the coronavirus.

Many theories about the origin of SARS-CoV-2 have emerged as governments continue to ask questions and the scientific community makes new suggestions, and today it is important to reflect on the invasion and predation of natural spaces and its link with the COVID-19 pandemic. .

Today, even with a major global effort in immunization, treatment engineering, and prevention research, we don’t have the absolute truth about COVID-19, but even though we don’t have enough evidence to completely subjugate a zoonosis of the bat to humans. , that idea doesn’t seem too far-fetched, instead we have the story of Denmark which slaughtered up to 17 million mink after a mutated version of the novel human-transmissible coronavirus was found in mink farms in November 2020, and now we do have suggestions that many mammals are potential reservoirs of SARS-CoV-2, able to transmit the virus to humans without suffering symptoms: we are talking about ferrets , pigs, mink, bats and even cats, and the possibility of this list continuing and over the next few months seems significant.

This leaves us with even more questions and doubts about how this pandemic will unfold, but something is certain in the end: vaccination should be a priority for our governments, in order to achieve the goal of the world’s population being immune to it. the novel coronavirus, and as the risk of mammals as potential reservoirs, and new evidence on dogs, gorillas, pumas and leopards definitely seems to remind us that if the world is hit by a wave of a mutation that affects both humans and animals, may we be at the start of a gigantic environmental catastrophe, in which not only will our health systems and our economy collapse, but many important species will begin to be affected and, as a result, all l ‘balance of our ecosystems on the planet would collapse and represent the aggravation of something that may have started with the invasion of a habitat n natural, developed as one of the deadliest pandemics the human race has ever known, and ended as a gigantic environmental catastrophe.

Finally, as if we don’t already have enough reasons to take care of the environment, one of the greatest lessons of the COVID-19 pandemic is to avoid the invasion of natural spaces that may balance ecologically on their own, but can harbor potentially dangerous and extremely virulent germs and viruses.

About the Author

Liber Ramírez Bustamante is a medical student currently one year away from graduating from the National School of Medicine and Homeopathy in Mexico City. He is an active member of the Association of Polytechnic Medicine Students (AMEP), an organization of the IFMSA (AMMEF). Liber is compromised with several advocacy topics, such as mental health, family violence, child abuse, climate change and racial equity, and hopes to become an integrative and multidisciplinary specialist in the future who can make his voice heard. voice as a health professional in order to make a positive impact in his community and in those who listen to his words.

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Population health versus convenience: the sobering cost of liberalizing alcohol policies https://surroundhealth.net/population-health-versus-convenience-the-sobering-cost-of-liberalizing-alcohol-policies/ Wed, 17 Nov 2021 20:36:09 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/population-health-versus-convenience-the-sobering-cost-of-liberalizing-alcohol-policies/ [ad_1] The Ontario government has significantly expanded the places and times where alcohol can be purchased. Its stated goals are twofold: to improve choice and convenience for consumers and to support jobs in the hospitality industry. Of course, there are many factors that governments consider when developing alcohol policy. From these perspectives, the expansion of […]]]>


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The Ontario government has significantly expanded the places and times where alcohol can be purchased. Its stated goals are twofold: to improve choice and convenience for consumers and to support jobs in the hospitality industry.

Of course, there are many factors that governments consider when developing alcohol policy. From these perspectives, the expansion of alcohol retailing might be justified. But what is missing from the discussions on this topic is the key trade-off between convenience and public health: that is, choice and convenience will undoubtedly come at the expense of the health of the population. .

It may sound like too dramatic a statement. It’s not. The effects of alcohol policy have been studied for decades, and there is no mystery as to what happens when the availability of alcohol increases, however modest. As consumption increases, so does a wide range of harms.

Many people are unaware of the extent and extent of harm caused by alcohol. It is responsible for more than 18,000 deaths per year in Canada, with costs estimated at $ 17 billion per year in health care, lost productivity, criminal justice and other direct costs, far exceeding the monetary benefits.

Meanwhile, alcohol consumption has increased during the pandemic, including binge drinking. That’s a concern in itself, but you don’t even have to drink a lot to experience any harm: research has shown that even moderate drinking is linked to increased rates of cancer. A shocking recent trend in the United States is that life expectancy is declining, with alcohol playing a major role – and Canada may soon follow suit. Further liberalization of alcohol sales will accelerate these trends.

A common argument for increasing convenience is that many jurisdictions, including several Canadian provinces, sell alcohol in grocery or convenience stores, with little apparent impact on public health or safety. But the scientific evidence tells a different story.

In Alberta and British Columbia, for example, the privatization of alcohol sales and the increase in the number of private alcohol retail outlets have been associated with an increase in alcohol-related deaths. Study after study in many jurisdictions shows that as the availability of alcohol increases, so do a range of acute and chronic health problems.

People of lower socio-economic status are disproportionately affected by these kinds of policies. These trends have been seen time and time again around the world, which is why the World Health Organization recommends strict regulations on the availability of alcohol, including a reduced number and concentration of retail outlets and reduced sales hours.

Liberalization of alcohol sales has been happening in Ontario for some time and has happened regardless of the party in power. But recently we’ve seen a big increase in the number of places where alcohol is sold, longer selling hours, and lower prices. This provincial government has also promised to allow the sale of alcohol in convenience stores. Decades of research leave no doubt that these increases in the availability of alcohol will have adverse effects on the health of the population.

It is up to citizens and our elected representatives to weigh the competing priorities of population health and convenience. But how do we balance them when we fail to recognize the clear relationship between availability and harm?

Too often we approach alcohol regulation as if it were an ordinary product like milk or apples. It’s not; Alcohol is a drug that has inherent health risks and causes significant damage, even at lower levels of consumption. We are not arguing for a return to prohibition or calling on people to stop drinking.

Simply put, alcohol policy should be crafted with the recognition that this is no ordinary product. Its under-regulation has direct negative effects and costs on the health of the population.

From a health perspective, our alcohol policy is going in the wrong direction. Ontario should not allow the sale of alcohol in convenience stores. We need to freeze further liberalization of alcohol sales. The provincial government should develop a provincial alcohol strategy in consultation with public health and safety stakeholders – and independently of the alcohol industry. And as a society, we need to rethink our approach to alcohol.

Dr Samantha Wells is Senior Director and Principal Investigator at the Institute for Mental Health Policy Research at the Center for Addiction and Mental Health. Pegeen walsh is the executive director of the Ontario Public Health Association. André Murie is CEO of MADD Canada.

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