health services – Surround Health http://surroundhealth.net/ Thu, 10 Mar 2022 13:00:47 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://surroundhealth.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-68-120x120.png health services – Surround Health http://surroundhealth.net/ 32 32 PCN Pulse Roundtable: Managing Population Health, Part 1 https://surroundhealth.net/pcn-pulse-roundtable-managing-population-health-part-1/ Thu, 10 Mar 2022 13:00:47 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/pcn-pulse-roundtable-managing-population-health-part-1/ PCN Clinical Directors and Population Health Expert Join Pulse PCN Editor Victoria Vaughan on Microsoft Teams to discuss how this approach works in their field Victoria: Could you start by describing your current projects in population health? Dr Jeremy Carter, CD, Herne Bay PCN, Kent We’ve been doing it in one form or another for […]]]>

PCN Clinical Directors and Population Health Expert Join Pulse PCN Editor Victoria Vaughan on Microsoft Teams to discuss how this approach works in their field

Victoria: Could you start by describing your current projects in population health?

Dr Jeremy Carter, CD, Herne Bay PCN, Kent
We’ve been doing it in one form or another for a long time. For many years, we have investigated where we could focus our resources based on the prevalence of a disease domain, for example using a QOF registry. Now it has a different name – population health management.

The way I see it as a CD is this: we have population health management projects at the Integrated Care Partnership (ICP) or Integrated Care System (ICS) level. These are things that the system examines and which are then directed to the NCPs. The example in our region is that of patients with diabetes, a diagnosis of depression, who live in a disadvantaged area and who have three other comorbidities. So we look at a specific cohort of patients who have higher needs, identify them, and put resources around them.

This fits well with our NCP because we are working on a integrated diabetes care project for East Kent, so our NCP is driving that. We have a multidisciplinary integrated diabetes care service with practice, community and hospital diabetes teams all working collaboratively.

As CD PCN, I’m more interested in how we drive the system. We would like to do population health management from the PCN level. This is where I think we are on this learning process. Where to start ? Do you identify this from a clinical point of view in the PCN, do you look at it from the patient’s point of view, with your patient participation group (PPG), for example? Do you see it only from a data perspective? There are obviously all the different sources of data that we can access, from public health to medical, to IT tools.

So we looked at that, and we as NCPs are going to take a hybrid view with all of that. It’s here that [our work with] alcohol [misuse] entered. The public health data for our PCN shows where we stand as an outlier. But is it something that patients consider important?

And, really important, [there is the] question of funding because you want it to be achievable and deliverable. You might consider integrating into community support, alcohol support services, police, A&E services, third sector support. There are lots of things you could do, but where is the funding?

The answer is “you have ARRS roles”, and that’s true, but they already do stuff. If we’re going to start doing more work, how do we square that circle? This is where we are.

Dr Jenny Darkwah, CD, Shoreditch Park and City PCN, North East London
I approach this from three angles. In my role at GCC, we have been doing this for a long time. When we began to consider sickle cell disease as a critically ill population, we set up a board of consultants, A&E staff, patients and volunteers, to identify the needs of this population. In recent years, we have been able to involve general practitioners in the care of these patients, as very often they had gone to hospital for their care. We have set up pathways so that general practitioners can share the care of some of these patients. I think it worked very well for a given population.

In my role as CD, we sat down together as a network and looked at what we thought GPs were needed. Some problems arose – the lone male was one of them, a hidden population that doesn’t enter the statistics. We’ve set up a way to reach those men who never show up. They might be sitting at home with their diabetes or hypertension. We called on our social advisor to set up a male group isolated – a reception service where they can discuss male problems. What we’re hoping to do, in the network, is make a connection between that and our health inequalities.

So we decided to seek a patient’s perspective on what we really needed and what patients wanted from us. We therefore called on Health Watch and set up a survey of approximately 1,500 patients. From there, we set up focus groups. We are still discussing the document from the Health Watch survey and using it to inform what we do next.

One innovation that emerged from the survey was a Pap smear clinic for working women. We have a young population who work in the city and who, very often, could not go to the office. We used nurses to set up extensive access Pap smear clinics for the network.

The other thing that came out of the survey was the issue of childhood obesity and a decline in the uptake of childhood vaccinations. This was also formed from public health data and we have
a population health center looking at data across the city and Hackney. We are in discussion with Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS), voluntary sectors and schools, to jointly determine how to tackle childhood obesity. We recognize that tackling it should come from the top, with things like ads. But maybe we can also create small groups where we teach healthy eating, healthy cooking and where families eat together.

The other thing that has helped consolidate services is looking at our homeless population. When we had the recent displacement of refugees, they were brought to a few hotels in my network, so we worked with councils, MPs, mental health services, language translation services, and that brought everyone together world, just by organizing these meetings, to ensure that these people can access services in an understandable way. These are some of the projects we are looking at at the network level.

In addition, there were larger projects on long-term conditions that came from integrated care boards (ICBs). I think these are things we have been doing for a long time in general medicine. They are more established; it’s a way to ensure that we work in a way that benefits patients.

Victoria It’s a great insight into how it works in Herne Bay and Hackney. Andi, can you discuss the thinking at the NHS England level and at the analysis level?

Andi Orlowski, Director of the Health Economics Unit, Lancashire, and NHS England Senior Adviser on Population Health
I think Jeremy and Jenny were downplaying how advanced they were when it came to health management. Working with patients, the pragmatic approach to finding what matters in their population and then delivering the alcohol program [for example], is exactly one of the actions we expect to see. No one understands people better.

Jenny [gives a] wonderful example of what we’re talking about with pop health analytics – people who are well today and may be sick tomorrow, populations that are missing data, those 45-year-old men who haven’t seen their doctor GP for 20 years because they think ‘I’ll get over it, it’ll be fine’. This is a sophisticated type of analysis, this whole population approach, which includes those “well” people today. They may not be well.

Of course, making sure the funding is there for bigger and broader projects [is a key issue].

So [we ask] ‘can we have a catch-up’, and we find [a patient] is twice his previous weight, drinks too much and smokes. We [had them down] as well because of the last interaction [with them].

Working together is the real challenge for NCPs. How do they fit in? Population health management only really works if we address broader determinants, big things, but act [on them] locally. Have NCPs already attached to the community, as well as the ICS, [gives us] this system view.

We could focus on the same five elements that flow from joint strategic needs assessments. They all tend to be the same things in different orders. So it will be obesity, COPD, cardiovascular disease, depression and anxiety and another health issue depending on your area.

This system level is pushed down to say “Where is the greatest variation on your patch and what would your population respond best to?” How do these populations [in deprived areas] access to care? How do you change big things like education, green spaces, pollution, jobs, those kinds of things that go beyond the direct remit of our NCP, but are intertwined. Another super exciting thing is that Jeremy and Jenny do all the population health testing themselves. There is clearly already a lot of capacity in NCPs. How can we fund them or provide them with the resources to do the job?

Victoria What type of data are you able to provide to NCPs or is it up to them to do it themselves?

Andi NHS England has a number of tools available through the National repository of commissioning dataand there are wonderful tools like At your fingertips and others. But of course [because of information governance rules] we don’t have access to that granular primary care data that’s absolute gold dust compared to [data from] secondary user services, acute hospital data.

Now we’re trying to talk about whole populations, we need to have even more than primary care and secondary care [data]we need data from local authorities.

For example, who is on the Assisted Trash Registry? If they need help bringing their bin to the curb, they may be isolated because they are too fragile to access it. [themselves] and I don’t have a friend [help].

Many additional data are available, [but] systems, even the ICS, does not have access to [it]. What [we can get] are the tools, or additional analytical resource.

But it is also difficult for NCPs to link their data to all these additional datasets [and] become more powerful. So what NHS England has and can provide are analytical approaches and tools, but without the data we still rely on people doing their own work. It’s wonderful to see that work is being done.

Click here to read Pulse PCN’s Leading Questions interview with Andi Orlowski on population health management

Complete relevant Men’s Health CPD Modules to Pulse learning by free registrationor upgrade to a premium subscription for full access at just £89 per year.

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Budget debate: the Ministry of Health launches targeted measures for subgroups to improve the health of the population https://surroundhealth.net/budget-debate-the-ministry-of-health-launches-targeted-measures-for-subgroups-to-improve-the-health-of-the-population/ Wed, 09 Mar 2022 09:12:01 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/budget-debate-the-ministry-of-health-launches-targeted-measures-for-subgroups-to-improve-the-health-of-the-population/ SINGAPORE – To improve overall health, the Ministry of Health (MOH) will put in place targeted measures to support and uplift various sub-groups including mothers, families, minorities and the elderly. The Straits Times looks at some of these initiatives. 1. Improve maternal health Increased support will be given to the mental well-being of women during […]]]>

SINGAPORE – To improve overall health, the Ministry of Health (MOH) will put in place targeted measures to support and uplift various sub-groups including mothers, families, minorities and the elderly.

The Straits Times looks at some of these initiatives.

1. Improve maternal health

Increased support will be given to the mental well-being of women during and after their pregnancy, as this would be crucial for the health of the child.

Minister of State for Health Janil Puthucheary told Parliament on Wednesday March 9 during his ministry’s debate that a local study, Growing Up in Singapore Towards Healthy Outcomes, found that maternal mental well-being during pregnancy could affect fetal brain development, leading to mood or anxiety disorders later in life.

The study found that about 7.2% of pregnant women had high depressive symptom scores during pregnancy. The proportion increases to 10% during the first three months postpartum.

KK Women’s and Children’s Hospital and National University Hospital will strengthen their support for the mental well-being of pregnant women and mothers by expanding accessibility to prenatal (during pregnancy) and postnatal mental health screening.

The Department of Health will also improve early intervention and support for more women who are screened as being at risk for depressive symptoms.

The Women’s Health Committee, chaired by Ms. Rahayu Mahzam, Parliamentary Secretary for Health, is planning an event on women’s health this year to raise awareness about women’s health to maximize awareness among different segments of the population. feminine. More details about the event will be shared later.

2. More support for families

Integrated health services for mothers and children will be available in 14 polyclinics over the next three years.

These health services include screening for postnatal depression and breastfeeding support when taking their child for vaccinations and child development screening at polyclinics.

Two pilot programs were launched at Punggol Polyclinic and Yishun Polyclinic in 2019, benefiting over 10,000 children and mothers.

In addition to integrating mother and child services, more holistic support for children and their families can be provided through a family support programme.

Known as Family Nexus, some health and social services can be provided under one roof at four sites in Choa Chu Kang, Punggol, Sembawang and Tampines this year.

These sites could be a polyclinic, GP clinic or social service agency office. Some programs include breastfeeding and lactation support services, body mass index and growth assessment checks for young children, and caregiver training.

3. Promote healthier lifestyles among Malay and Indian communities

To promote healthier lifestyles among these ethnic minorities, the Ministry of Health will work with Malay and Indian community leaders and partners.

A task force was formed last year by the Ministry of Health to improve the health of ethnic minority groups here. It aimed to design culturally relevant programs and help rally the community against unhealthy habits.

Giving an update on the programme, Ms Rahayu said the Health Promotion Board (HPB) has brought together experienced community leaders with the necessary expertise to form a Malay Community Outreach (MCO) task force.

There are five new sub-committees focusing on mental wellbeing, reducing smoking, improving eating habits, increasing physical activity and health screening within the Malay community, a she added.

The MCO will work with various parties to effectively expand the reach of SPB programs.

Health promotion activities for the Indian community will also be rolled out, she added.

For example, HPB has worked with key stakeholders like the Indian Development Association of Singapore to leverage culturally significant programs and events like Deepavali to strengthen healthy cooking.

HPB is also actively engaging Indian food and beverage outlets to participate in the Healthier Dining Program, which rewards customers for choosing healthy options.

She pointed out in parliament last year that in 2020, 14.4% of Malaysians and 14.2% of Indians had diabetes, compared to 8.2% of Chinese.

Additionally, 37.5% of Malaysians and 36.1% of Chinese have higher blood pressure, compared to 29.5% of Indians.

4. Support seniors to age well

To enable seniors to improve and maintain their health, a holistic program that includes physical, mental and social well-being will be developed and implemented by HPB and the People’s Association.

The program, called “Live Well, Age Well”, will be gradually rolled out across the country from May, according to a “hub and spoke” model.

It will be offered at designated community centres, residents’ corners, aged care centers and faith-based organizations, depending on the profile of residents and clients.

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Derek Novak is a Becker’s Hospital Review Population Health Leader Known Des Moines, Iowa (IA), MercyOne https://surroundhealth.net/derek-novak-is-a-beckers-hospital-review-population-health-leader-known-des-moines-iowa-ia-mercyone/ Fri, 11 Feb 2022 16:48:14 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/derek-novak-is-a-beckers-hospital-review-population-health-leader-known-des-moines-iowa-ia-mercyone/ 02/11/2022 Clive, Iowa- MercyOne Population Health Services Organization President Derek Novak is one of 58 Population Health Executives You Need to Know, as selected by Becker Hospital Review. Mr. Novak is the only Iowa-based healthcare leader to be recognized. In its announcement, Becker’s acknowledged the essential role of these healthcare leaders, saying, “The pandemic has […]]]>

02/11/2022

Clive, Iowa- MercyOne Population Health Services Organization President Derek Novak is one of 58 Population Health Executives You Need to Know, as selected by Becker Hospital Review. Mr. Novak is the only Iowa-based healthcare leader to be recognized.

In its announcement, Becker’s acknowledged the essential role of these healthcare leaders, saying, “The pandemic has brought to light large gaps in population health and access to care, increasing the importance of the executives overseeing these initiatives. Addressing population health issues is vital for health systems to keep their communities healthy and to reinvent the care delivery models of tomorrow. The leaders highlighted on this list have a passion for transforming healthcare and driving change within their organizations. »

Novak and MercyOne Population Health Services Organization (PHSO) support our mission to transform health by ensuring everyone has personalized and convenient access to healthcare on the MercyOne network. MercyOne’s provider partners, through the Incirca Health Network powered by MercyOne, extend our circle of care through our patient-centered approach to care management, helping patients with complex needs navigate their health journey. health.

“MercyOne’s PHSO lives our mission by helping our network achieve the triple goal of improving outcomes, improving experience, and reducing the total cost of healthcare,” Novak said. “I am honored to be recognized on behalf of MercyOne, for our success in building a strong, connected network of healthcare facilities and services to care for the people of Iowa.”

As President of MercyOne Population Health Services Organization, Mr. Novak also provides leadership for business solutions and community health and wellness at MercyOne. He served at MercyOne in various capacities for nearly 15 years. Prior to his current role, he served as Chief Operating Officer of MercyOne PHSO. Prior to joining MercyOne, Mr. Novak worked for aviation and aerospace company Textron. He received his Masters in Business Administration from Upper Iowa University in Fayette in 2008.

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About Mercy One

MercyOne is a connected system of healthcare facilities and services dedicated to helping people and communities live their best lives. MercyOne healthcare providers and staff make health the top priority. The system’s clinics, medical centers, hospitals, and affiliates are located throughout the state of Iowa and beyond. Based in central Iowa, MercyOne was founded in 1998 through a collaboration between CommonSpirit Health and Trinity Health, two of the nation’s leading nonprofit Catholic health organizations.

Media contact
Adam Amdor
Public Relations and Content Manager
319-272-7368
adam.amdor@mercyhealth.com

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WHO/Europe urges governments to include young people in decisions about their health https://surroundhealth.net/who-europe-urges-governments-to-include-young-people-in-decisions-about-their-health/ Fri, 11 Feb 2022 14:11:05 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/who-europe-urges-governments-to-include-young-people-in-decisions-about-their-health/ WHO/Europe has released new guidance on how to involve adolescents and young people in decision-making about their health. The new guide calls on governments and decision-makers to listen to and understand the perspectives, experiences and needs of young people when developing policies or decisions affecting their health. These may include, for example, policies that are […]]]>

WHO/Europe has released new guidance on how to involve adolescents and young people in decision-making about their health.

The new guide calls on governments and decision-makers to listen to and understand the perspectives, experiences and needs of young people when developing policies or decisions affecting their health. These may include, for example, policies that are part of a national child and adolescent health strategy, or those related to youth and adolescent health services.

“Policymakers have a professional and moral responsibility to ensure that any policy that affects young people’s health truly includes young people at all stages,” said Dr Natasha Azzopardi Muscat, Country Health Policy and Systems Director at WHO/Europe. “This means that young people must be included in the development and implementation of these health policies, whether they impact their health at school, in their communities or at national and international levels.”

In a survey conducted in 2020, WHO/Europe found that only 8 countries in the European Region involved children in the review, development and implementation of a child health strategy and the teenager. Twenty countries involved them in only 1 or 2 of these steps, and 6 did not involve young people at all.

“Youth engagement has the potential to provide important and sometimes unexpected insights into the challenges young people face,” explained Dr Azzopardi Muscat. “And it’s clear that we have room for improvement.”

Reflecting the needs of young people in the European Region

The new guide is based on surveys and consultations with young people across the European Region over the past two years. Many young people involved shared their desire to be heard and their willingness to participate in decisions affecting their health and well-being.

The new guide supports governments and local decision makers with advice on:

  • prepare young people for their commitment;
  • engaging with young people through consultations and how to provide feedback;
  • follow the young people and share with them the results and action points.

The guide also includes concrete examples of successful youth involvement. These include the July 2021 multi-stakeholder consultation to promote adolescent health and well-being in the European Region, led by WHO/Europe and the Partnership for Maternal, Newborn and (PMNCH), in collaboration with the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) and the United Nations population (UNFPA). As part of this consultation, young people were actively involved in the facilitation and co-facilitation of thematic sessions.

By actively involving young people in a youth-friendly environment in the same way, policy makers can ensure that policies affecting young people respond to their needs and perspectives.

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UMass Center for Public Health Promotion COVID-19 Update: February 10 https://surroundhealth.net/umass-center-for-public-health-promotion-covid-19-update-february-10/ Thu, 10 Feb 2022 22:27:02 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/umass-center-for-public-health-promotion-covid-19-update-february-10/ In a weekly email to Public Health Promotion Center (PHPC) Campus Community Co-Directors Ann Becker and Jeffrey Hescock, address the campus’ COVID positivity rate, vaccination clinics, and availability of KN95 masks and unobserved test kits. This email is as follows: Dear campus community, As we wrap up the third week of the spring semester, we […]]]>

In a weekly email to Public Health Promotion Center (PHPC) Campus Community Co-Directors Ann Becker and Jeffrey Hescock, address the campus’ COVID positivity rate, vaccination clinics, and availability of KN95 masks and unobserved test kits.

This email is as follows:

Dear campus community,

As we wrap up the third week of the spring semester, we see campus life leading to an anticipated increase in positive COVID-19 cases. We continue to monitor COVID trends in our community through our symptomatic and adaptive testing programs and our sewage monitoring. At our highly immunized campus, these cases occur primarily in our undergraduate students who report having minimal to moderate symptoms of infection. No hospitalizations to report.

The Public Health Promotion Center (PHPC) continues to hold COVID-19 vaccination clinics two days a week at the Center on campus. This week, vaccination clinics are offered on Thursdays and Fridays from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. Starting next week, vaccination clinics will be offered on Wednesdays from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. and Thursdays from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. until March 10. Walk-ins are accepted, but we encourage everyone to make an appointment.

The latest COVID-19 testing data for the UMass community from February 2-8 shows 416 new positive cases. The university’s cumulative positivity rate is 7.45%, up from 4.48% last week. The state’s seven-day positivity rate is 4.08%. A similar increase in cases was seen at other universities at the start of the semester.

The UMass cases primarily involve undergraduates linked to unmasked social activities, based on contact tracing assessments. We must all remain vigilant by following key public health protocols in place, including our indoor mask requirement. The UMass community is invited to pick up free KN95 masks each week at PHPC at Campus Center.

The majority of positive cases are people who show symptoms of COVID and use the unobserved convenient test kit. Please continue to monitor yourself daily for symptoms of COVID-19 before coming to campus. If you don’t feel well, stay home and get tested. University Health Services offers symptomatic testing for students, or if you have an unobserved test kit, you can drop it off at one of the campus kiosks.

Thank you for all you do to take care of yourself and each other, and to support the health of our community.

Truly,

Co-Directors of the Public Health Promotion Center (PHPC)

Ann Becker, Director of Public Health
Jeffrey Hescock, Executive Director of Environment, Health and Safety

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Mental Health Promotion Week | Queen’s University Gazette https://surroundhealth.net/mental-health-promotion-week-queens-university-gazette/ Fri, 21 Jan 2022 19:23:50 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/mental-health-promotion-week-queens-university-gazette/ Mental Health Promotion Week features virtual events and initiatives to support mental health at Queen’s. During Mental Health Awareness Week, the supports and resources available to students, staff and faculty at Queen’s University are highlighted while raising awareness about mental health and stigma. Queen’s University’s annual Mental Health Week is an opportunity to reflect on […]]]>

Mental Health Promotion Week features virtual events and initiatives to support mental health at Queen’s.

During Mental Health Awareness Week, the supports and resources available to students, staff and faculty at Queen’s University are highlighted while raising awareness about mental health and stigma.

Queen’s University’s annual Mental Health Week is an opportunity to reflect on personal mental health and work towards building a community of care. Designed to surround Bell Let’s Talk Day (January 26), Mental Health Awareness Week aims to address the stigma associated with mental illness while raising awareness of the supports and resources available to students, staff and the teachers. The week-long event runs from January 24-28 with various initiatives aimed at increasing social connections and improving emotional, physical and mental health.

Our goal is to highlight some of the incredible mental health promotion efforts at Queen’s, especially the work done by student leaders and student staff,” says Kate Humphrys, Health Promotion Coordinator, Student Wellness Services (SWS).We hope this week will help keep the conversation going on this crucial topic throughout the year.

Post-secondary education can be a stressful time for students, especially with changes to learning formats and public health guidelines. As the university enters its third year of the COVID-19 pandemic, mental health education and advocacy continues to be an important priority at Queen’s. Encouraging open, respectful and inclusive conversations, Mental Health Promotion Week is about feeling connected even in times of social distancing and remote learning.

“We know that mental health is essential to our overall well-being and sometimes we can focus on the self-care activities that help maintain good mental health, but other times it may not be enough,” says Beth Blackett, Special Health Promotion Projects, Student Welfare Services When someone is struggling, they often need a community of care that can help them find the supports and resources they need. Mental Health Awareness Week helps highlight some of these supports and reminds everyone that it’s okay to talk about mental health, to reach out when we need help and , above all, to support each other.

Working to create an environment where everyone feels safe and accepted is paramount to ensuring everyone can achieve their full potential as healthy, resilient and inspired members of the Queen’s community. Recognizing the intersectionality between mental health and other areas of wellness, Student Wellness Services, along with various student-run groups and departments on campus, have created a number of virtual challenges, of events and workshops designed to stimulate discussion and social engagement.

Events and Initiatives

  • This year, in collaboration with the Queen’s Student Mental Health Network, the Campus Wellness Project will announce candidates for Classroom Champions for Mental Health. Class Champions recognize teachers, instructors and teaching assistants who create learning environments where student mental health is valued and supported.
  • Take part in the Get Active challenge by signing up for a virtual fitness class at ARC, hosted by Athletics and Recreation.
  • Participate in the Rest & Relax Challenge by booking a peer wellness coaching session or healthy lifestyle professional appointment to learn strategies to improve sleep habits. Attend a workshop on how to create a personalized self-care plan by sharing evidence-based strategies for managing stress, or learn how to support someone in difficulty by signing up for an identify and respond seminar students in distress or in crisis. Find your safe space through trauma-informed writing exercises and guided mediation.
  • Grab your paper and writing utensils and create beautiful affirmation art with Queen’s Sexual Violence Prevention and Response Services. Connect with members of the LGBQT community by participating in Queer Survival Discussions, hosted in conjunction with Sexual Assault Center Kingston. Finding Your Joy Through Music encourages BIPOC students to come together and share their favorite songs from their playlist. Take a professionally led mindfulness session to visualize and promote positive personal growth.
  • Visit the virtual photo booth available on Bell Let’s Talk Day and take part in a digital scavenger hunt focusing on BIPOC resources. Visit any of the various in-person locations on campus to pick up Bell merchandise, including toques and bubble wrap. Go online and download the Bell Let’s Talk Toolkit and see how you can support mental health more.
  • Feed yourself by signing up and picking up a free fresh food box with all the key produce and ingredients needed to make a healthy meal, or check out the Food Access Resource website for more tips on where to find healthy, affordable food . Take part in Stories Spark Change with conversations with internationally acclaimed author Roxane Gay and bestselling author Eternity Martis about healing and sexual violence.
  • Embrace nature by exploring the outdoors in the Get Outside challenge.

Learn more about the virtual events offered on campus on the Mental Health Promotion Week webpage. Events will continue to be added throughout the week.

Additional Resources

Queen’s students can access support from the AMS Peer Support Center and the Student Wellness Services Mental Health Services website. Additional resources include Empower Me, a 24/7 phone service that connects students with qualified counselors, consultants, and life coaches for a variety of issues, and TAO (Therapy Assistance Online), an online, mobile-friendly library of wellness-promoting pathways.

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Why a healthcare system pays healthcare providers to respond to their emails https://surroundhealth.net/why-a-healthcare-system-pays-healthcare-providers-to-respond-to-their-emails/ Fri, 21 Jan 2022 09:36:01 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/why-a-healthcare-system-pays-healthcare-providers-to-respond-to-their-emails/ IIt’s not uncommon for Maria Byron, a primary care physician, to spend hours each week combing through emails from patients seeking her medical advice. These messages may contain questions about medications or completely new concerns that patients did not mention during in-person visits. And while the University of California, San Francisco, where Byron practices, has […]]]>

IIt’s not uncommon for Maria Byron, a primary care physician, to spend hours each week combing through emails from patients seeking her medical advice.

These messages may contain questions about medications or completely new concerns that patients did not mention during in-person visits. And while the University of California, San Francisco, where Byron practices, has seen volumes rise from a few hundred thousand such emails in 2016 to around two million in 2021, she and other clinicians generally have no not been paid to answer it.

“It’s become kind of an extra thing that doctors spend many hours a day doing…that’s starting to weigh on people,” Byron said.

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That’s why she’s leading a new experiment at UCSF to allow clinicians to bill insurers for certain medical matches. This is partly to assuage the exhaustion caused by all the unpaid tasks on a clinician’s plate. But it also aims to inspire clinicians to spend much of their workday on email, a modality that patients are increasingly comfortable with.

“Imagine getting 50 emails a day, asking for all your advice, but having a busy schedule with no time to respond,” said Tim Judson, a UCSF hospital and emergency physician who has studied the patient response to electronic communication. an email. “That’s what most doctors feel every day.”

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Since November, doctors, nurse practitioners, physician assistants and a handful of other clinicians at UCSF have been able to bill payers for patient emails requiring a medical evaluation or more than a few minutes to respond, Byron said. , also deputy director of medical information at UCSF. . UCSF recently expanded the system to all specialties after testing it for dermatologists.

The move follows the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services’ pandemic-era policy allowing Medicare reimbursement for such messages, called e-Visits. Most of the commercial payers UCSF works with have followed suit, Byron said.

“If it’s not valued and recognized through some kind of payment, it’s very difficult for the healthcare organization to pass [email] in some sort of daytime activity,” Byron said.

It’s still unclear how much of that payment goes into doctors’ pockets, because reimbursement varies depending on the payer and the department they work for, Byron said. But UCSF has seen an average reimbursement of $65 per email consultation, though patients typically pay much less, if at all.

If successful, the UCSF initiative could serve as a roadmap for other healthcare systems looking to compensate clinicians for the time they spend in virtual communication. But it has also led to a wider debate about the downstream effects of new billing categories, which could create more administrative burden, irritate patients who are hit with unexpected co-payments, and move further away from payments rewarding quality, not volume, of health services.

“As nice as it is that these are now being paid for, it just creates another bucket” for billing, said Julia Adler-Milstein, a UCSF professor who studies health informatics. “It seems a bit untenable to keep creating all these buckets, and it feels like a kind of test of whether this strategy is going to work.”

Still, it could be a good short-term option to ensure clinicians get paid for virtual communication, given that much of healthcare operates on a fee-for-service basis, Byron said. “It is important to recognize that [virtual care] is valuable the same way an in-person visit is valuable.

Other healthcare systems are watching closely as competitors experiment with new strategies to combat email-related burnout.

“We’re going to be working hard to find a solution, because it’s hard to overstate how unhappy doctors are with this,” said Lawrence Casalino, professor of population health sciences at Weill Cornell Medicine. Casalino sits on a Cornell committee focused on physician workflow that is exploring strategies to reduce the burden, including the potential offloading of some messages to tools powered by artificial intelligence.

Casalino said there are concerns that billing for correspondence by email could encourage patients to switch providers. “If the organization tries to charge for these things, patients are going to be upset,” he said.

Adler-Milstein warned that patients may be reluctant to send a potential message if they are told they could be charged. “The question at this point is, do they stop? Do they pick up the phone?

Byron said UCSF patients have widely embraced the system, which warns them when they send messages through the patient portal that they could incur a co-payment, depending on how long it takes for a response from their patient. provider. For the vast majority of patients on Medicare and California’s Medicaid program, the new billing system hasn’t led to co-payment, Byron said. Patients on some commercial plans have seen co-pays in the range of $5 to $10 for a message.

She said UCSF renamed portal emails to “medical advice message” instead of “e-Visit” – the term CMS uses for billing – because some patients initially thought they would be charged for a telehealth visit, which usually costs more.

Casalino said he expects more health systems to experiment with similar models to address clinician burnout that has only increased during the pandemic. “We have to experiment,” he said, but “as the experimentation goes on, I think the clinicians providing care are really suffering.”

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Genesis Health System and MercyOne Announce Partnership on Population Health Services https://surroundhealth.net/genesis-health-system-and-mercyone-announce-partnership-on-population-health-services/ Wed, 12 Jan 2022 15:08:26 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/genesis-health-system-and-mercyone-announce-partnership-on-population-health-services/ 01/12/2022 Clive, Iowa and Davenport, Iowa – MercyOne and Genesis Health System are pleased to announce that they have reached an agreement for Genesis to join MercyOne Network of partner suppliers. The partnership was developed to seek out collaborative opportunities and will be positioned as Incirca Health Network powered by MercyOne and Genesis Health. This […]]]>

01/12/2022

Clive, Iowa and Davenport, Iowa – MercyOne and Genesis Health System are pleased to announce that they have reached an agreement for Genesis to join MercyOne Network of partner suppliers. The partnership was developed to seek out collaborative opportunities and will be positioned as Incirca Health Network powered by MercyOne and Genesis Health. This multi-year agreement will aim to leverage joint expertise in population health and expand value-based healthcare in their respective regions.

“Our organizations share a deep commitment to the health of our members, the communities we serve, and the promotion of values-based care,” said Derek Novak, president of MercyOne Population Health Services Organization. “By combining our strengths in population health and service areas, we are uniquely positioned to improve health in our communities and reduce the total cost of care. We look forward to working together to improve outcomes for those we are privileged to serve. »

“This partnership will allow us to expand our work to transform care with a focus on keeping patients healthy and able to manage chronic conditions before their conditions require additional interventions,” said Kurt Andersen. , MD, Clinical Director/Chief Medical Officer, Genesis Health System.

The Incirca Health Network offers personalized and extremely convenient access to healthcare through MercyOne’s network of partner providers. This network is made up of health insurance payers participating in a value-based contract with MercyOne.

“Genesis Health System’s expertise and commitment to innovation and quality healthcare aligns perfectly with MercyOne’s commitment to providing radically practical care in a patient-centered approach,” said said Bob Ritz, President and CEO of MercyOne. “As Genesis joins our network of vendor partners, we are taking the opportunity to expand the ability to deliver great health outcomes for a much larger part of the state, bringing more value to patients and to payers.”

“Combining population health resources from MercyOne and Genesis allows us to bring more capabilities to improve the health of Iowans,” said Doug Cropper, president and CEO of Genesis Health System. .

For more than 20 years, MercyOne Public Health Services Organization has developed deep expertise in value-based care and has saved Iowa over $200 million* in healthcare costs while continuously improving quality and patient satisfaction.

*Source: https://www.mercyone.org/aco/

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About Mercy One

Mercy One is a connected system of healthcare facilities and services dedicated to helping people and communities live their best lives. MercyOne healthcare providers and staff make health the top priority. The system’s clinics, medical centers, hospitals, and affiliates are located throughout the state of Iowa and beyond. Based in central Iowa, MercyOne was founded in 1998 through a collaboration between Catholic Health Initiatives (now CommonSpirit Health) and Trinity Health, two of the nation’s leading nonprofit Catholic health organizations.

About Genesis:

Genesis Health System, its affiliates and partners, provide a continuum of health care services for a 12-county region of eastern Iowa and western Illinois. Our affiliates include: hospital care at Genesis Medical Center, Davenport and DeWitt, Iowa and Genesis Medical Center, Silvis and Genesis Medical Center, Aledo, Illinois; home health and palliative care services through Genesis VNA and Hospice; Genesis Workplace Services, including workplace health, employee assistance program and wellness services for employers and their employees; Clarissa C. Cook Hospice; communities of older people; Genesis Health Group, with more than 330 healthcare providers; the Genesis Quad Cities Family Medicine Residency Program; Genesis Psychology Associates; Genesis Practical Care Clinics; and, Genesis home medical equipment. Partners include Crow Valley Surgery Center, Bettendorf; Digestive Health Center, Bettendorf; Spring Park Surgical Center, Davenport; and Genesis Imaging Centers. Genesis operates the Jackson County Regional Health Center, Maquoketa, Iowa. Genesis is one of the largest employers in the Quad Cities region with over 5,000 employees. For more information visit our website at www.genesishealth.com.

Media Contacts
Adam Amdor
Mercy One
PR and Communication Manager
319-272-7368
adam.amdor@mercyhealth.com

Craig Cooper
Genesis Health Systems
Senior Communications Specialist
563-421-9263
cooperc@genesishealth.com

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Lack of medicines and human resources hamper health services for adolescents: study https://surroundhealth.net/lack-of-medicines-and-human-resources-hamper-health-services-for-adolescents-study/ Sun, 12 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/lack-of-medicines-and-human-resources-hamper-health-services-for-adolescents-study/ FE ONLINE REPORT | Published: December 12, 2021 6:39:35 PM | Update: December 14, 2021 4:44:27 p.m. Although the service environment of adolescent health centers across the country has improved, lack of medicines and human resources remain a challenge, according to a new study. The accountability and responsiveness of service providers at adolescent-friendly health service […]]]>