health promotion – Surround Health http://surroundhealth.net/ Thu, 10 Mar 2022 06:00:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://surroundhealth.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-68-120x120.png health promotion – Surround Health http://surroundhealth.net/ 32 32 “Me Dieron Vida”: The effects of a pilot health promotion intervention to reduce cardiometabolic risk and improve behavioral health in older Latinos living with HIV https://surroundhealth.net/me-dieron-vida-the-effects-of-a-pilot-health-promotion-intervention-to-reduce-cardiometabolic-risk-and-improve-behavioral-health-in-older-latinos-living-with-hiv/ Thu, 10 Mar 2022 06:00:00 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/me-dieron-vida-the-effects-of-a-pilot-health-promotion-intervention-to-reduce-cardiometabolic-risk-and-improve-behavioral-health-in-older-latinos-living-with-hiv/ This article was originally published here Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2022 Feb 25;19(5):2667. doi: 10.3390/ijerph19052667. ABSTRACT There are significant knowledge gaps about the synergistic and disparate burden of health disparities associated with cardiovascular health problems, poorer mental health outcomes and suboptimal management of HIV care on health of Older Latinos Living with HIV […]]]>

This article was originally published here

Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2022 Feb 25;19(5):2667. doi: 10.3390/ijerph19052667.

ABSTRACT

There are significant knowledge gaps about the synergistic and disparate burden of health disparities associated with cardiovascular health problems, poorer mental health outcomes and suboptimal management of HIV care on health of Older Latinos Living with HIV (OLLWH). This pilot study aimed to assess the feasibility and acceptability of an innovative application of an already established health promotion intervention – Happy Older Latinos are Active (HOLA) – among this marginalized population. Eighteen self-identified Latino men with an undetectable HIV viral load and a documented risk of cardiometabolic disease participated in this study. Although the attrition rate of 22% was higher than expected, participants attended 77% of the sessions and nearly 95% of the virtual walks. Participants reported being very satisfied with the intervention, as evidenced by quantitative self-assessments (CSQ-8; M = 31, South Dakota = 1.5) and qualitative measures. Participants appreciated the connection with the community health worker and their peers to reduce social isolation. The results indicate that the HOLA intervention is an innovative way to provide a health promotion intervention tailored to meet the diverse needs and circumstances of OLLWHs, is feasible and acceptable, and has the potential to have positive health effects. of OLLWHs.

PMID:35270360 | DOI:10.3390/ijerph19052667

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Budget debate: the Ministry of Health launches targeted measures for subgroups to improve the health of the population https://surroundhealth.net/budget-debate-the-ministry-of-health-launches-targeted-measures-for-subgroups-to-improve-the-health-of-the-population/ Wed, 09 Mar 2022 09:12:01 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/budget-debate-the-ministry-of-health-launches-targeted-measures-for-subgroups-to-improve-the-health-of-the-population/ SINGAPORE – To improve overall health, the Ministry of Health (MOH) will put in place targeted measures to support and uplift various sub-groups including mothers, families, minorities and the elderly. The Straits Times looks at some of these initiatives. 1. Improve maternal health Increased support will be given to the mental well-being of women during […]]]>

SINGAPORE – To improve overall health, the Ministry of Health (MOH) will put in place targeted measures to support and uplift various sub-groups including mothers, families, minorities and the elderly.

The Straits Times looks at some of these initiatives.

1. Improve maternal health

Increased support will be given to the mental well-being of women during and after their pregnancy, as this would be crucial for the health of the child.

Minister of State for Health Janil Puthucheary told Parliament on Wednesday March 9 during his ministry’s debate that a local study, Growing Up in Singapore Towards Healthy Outcomes, found that maternal mental well-being during pregnancy could affect fetal brain development, leading to mood or anxiety disorders later in life.

The study found that about 7.2% of pregnant women had high depressive symptom scores during pregnancy. The proportion increases to 10% during the first three months postpartum.

KK Women’s and Children’s Hospital and National University Hospital will strengthen their support for the mental well-being of pregnant women and mothers by expanding accessibility to prenatal (during pregnancy) and postnatal mental health screening.

The Department of Health will also improve early intervention and support for more women who are screened as being at risk for depressive symptoms.

The Women’s Health Committee, chaired by Ms. Rahayu Mahzam, Parliamentary Secretary for Health, is planning an event on women’s health this year to raise awareness about women’s health to maximize awareness among different segments of the population. feminine. More details about the event will be shared later.

2. More support for families

Integrated health services for mothers and children will be available in 14 polyclinics over the next three years.

These health services include screening for postnatal depression and breastfeeding support when taking their child for vaccinations and child development screening at polyclinics.

Two pilot programs were launched at Punggol Polyclinic and Yishun Polyclinic in 2019, benefiting over 10,000 children and mothers.

In addition to integrating mother and child services, more holistic support for children and their families can be provided through a family support programme.

Known as Family Nexus, some health and social services can be provided under one roof at four sites in Choa Chu Kang, Punggol, Sembawang and Tampines this year.

These sites could be a polyclinic, GP clinic or social service agency office. Some programs include breastfeeding and lactation support services, body mass index and growth assessment checks for young children, and caregiver training.

3. Promote healthier lifestyles among Malay and Indian communities

To promote healthier lifestyles among these ethnic minorities, the Ministry of Health will work with Malay and Indian community leaders and partners.

A task force was formed last year by the Ministry of Health to improve the health of ethnic minority groups here. It aimed to design culturally relevant programs and help rally the community against unhealthy habits.

Giving an update on the programme, Ms Rahayu said the Health Promotion Board (HPB) has brought together experienced community leaders with the necessary expertise to form a Malay Community Outreach (MCO) task force.

There are five new sub-committees focusing on mental wellbeing, reducing smoking, improving eating habits, increasing physical activity and health screening within the Malay community, a she added.

The MCO will work with various parties to effectively expand the reach of SPB programs.

Health promotion activities for the Indian community will also be rolled out, she added.

For example, HPB has worked with key stakeholders like the Indian Development Association of Singapore to leverage culturally significant programs and events like Deepavali to strengthen healthy cooking.

HPB is also actively engaging Indian food and beverage outlets to participate in the Healthier Dining Program, which rewards customers for choosing healthy options.

She pointed out in parliament last year that in 2020, 14.4% of Malaysians and 14.2% of Indians had diabetes, compared to 8.2% of Chinese.

Additionally, 37.5% of Malaysians and 36.1% of Chinese have higher blood pressure, compared to 29.5% of Indians.

4. Support seniors to age well

To enable seniors to improve and maintain their health, a holistic program that includes physical, mental and social well-being will be developed and implemented by HPB and the People’s Association.

The program, called “Live Well, Age Well”, will be gradually rolled out across the country from May, according to a “hub and spoke” model.

It will be offered at designated community centres, residents’ corners, aged care centers and faith-based organizations, depending on the profile of residents and clients.

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UMass Center for Public Health Promotion COVID-19 Update: March 4 https://surroundhealth.net/umass-center-for-public-health-promotion-covid-19-update-march-4/ Mon, 07 Mar 2022 20:07:03 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/umass-center-for-public-health-promotion-covid-19-update-march-4/ In an email to the campus community, Ann Becker and Jeffrey Hescock, co-directors of the Public Health Promotion Center (PHPC), described a drop in the COVID-19 positivity rate on campus, the continued indoor masking requirement and the availability of a vaccination clinic. This email is as follows: Dear campus community, We continue to monitor COVID-19 […]]]>

In an email to the campus community, Ann Becker and Jeffrey Hescock, co-directors of the Public Health Promotion Center (PHPC), described a drop in the COVID-19 positivity rate on campus, the continued indoor masking requirement and the availability of a vaccination clinic.

This email is as follows:

Dear campus community,

We continue to monitor COVID-19 trends in our community through our symptomatic, adaptive and voluntary screening program as well as sewage monitoring. The latest COVID-19 testing data for the UMass community from February 23 to March 1 shows 64 new positive cases. The university’s positivity rate is 1.88%, down from 3.79% last week. The state’s seven-day positivity rate is 1.85%. Those who test positive continue to report that they have minimal to moderate symptoms of infection, and there are no hospitalizations to report.

We are very encouraged by the overall decline in the number of cases and positivity rate over the past two weeks, and will incorporate this trend into our ongoing assessments. Our inner mask requirement remains in effect.

We continue to hold COVID-19 vaccination clinics two days a week. Vaccination clinics are offered Wednesdays from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. and Thursdays from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. until March 10. Walk-ins will be accepted, but we encourage everyone to make an appointment.

Thank you for all you do to take care of yourself and each other, and to support the health of our community.

Truly,

Co-Directors of the Public Health Promotion Center (PHPC)

Ann Becker, Director of Public Health
Jeffrey Hescock, Executive Director of Environment, Health and Safety

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Health Promotion Coordinator position at UNIVERSITY OF MELBOURNE https://surroundhealth.net/health-promotion-coordinator-position-at-university-of-melbourne/ Wed, 02 Mar 2022 04:04:28 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/health-promotion-coordinator-position-at-university-of-melbourne/ Location: Parcville Role type: Full-time, 3-year CDD until March 2025 Department/School: Student and Academic Services Salary: UOM 8 – $108,009 – $116,906 per year plus 17% super Founded in 1853, the University of Melbourne is Australia’s No. 1 university and is consistently ranked among the top universities in the world. We are […]]]>

Location: Parcville

Role type: Full-time, 3-year CDD until March 2025

Department/School: Student and Academic Services

Salary: UOM 8 – $108,009 – $116,906 per year plus 17% super

Founded in 1853, the University of Melbourne is Australia’s No. 1 university and is consistently ranked among the top universities in the world. We are proud of our staff, our commitment to excellence in research and teaching, and our global engagement.

About Student and Scholars Services

Student and Academic Services provides student administration and services from recruitment and point of inquiry to graduation. This team also provides wellness and scholarship services to students and staff.

Wellness services is part of Student Success within Student and Academic Services. Wellness services include Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS), Health Service, Chaplaincy, and Student Equity and Disability Support (SEDS). The Health Service provides general medical, psychological and psychiatric services to students, their dependents and University staff. The Health Service provides a channel through referral to other support services within the Student Success Cluster and other health and wellness services.

About the role

As Health Promotion Coordinator, you will oversee a multi-faceted program of work covering the full spectrum of health promotion actions. You will be responsible for student engagement and participation, volunteer management, program management and evaluation, and you will also contribute to University-wide health-related governance . Based in the Health Service, you will work with a wide range of key stakeholders, including student volunteers, divisions, faculties, and external funding agencies to coordinate health promotion initiatives.

In a typical week at work, you can:

  • Develop and coordinate holistic health campaigns and programs that promote personal, social and civic development and evaluate the effectiveness of the health promotion program
  • Foster relationships with key stakeholders in divisions and faculties to enable a systematic, coordinated institution-wide approach to health promotion with clearly defined goals, targets and evaluation processes
  • Provide health promotion program support, including quarterly meetings of the Healthier University Fund Governance Group and regular meetings with Bupa Partnership representatives
  • Submit regular reports on the University’s health promotion program and its associated expenditures, including monitoring program implementation in accordance with funding guidelines and the approved program planner for the year

About you

You will be a positive and influential leader, able to communicate and collaborate effectively with a wide range of people from diverse backgrounds. You will be solution-focused, with a constant drive to improve existing processes to generate broader reach for your health promotion programs. Your attention to detail and your ability to lead and coach teams will enable you to succeed in this role.

Ideally, you will also have:

  • A master’s degree in health promotion, public health or a similar discipline with at least five years of subsequent relevant experience or an equivalent combination of experience and/or education/training
  • Demonstrated skills, knowledge, and experience in leading health promotion programs and teams, including the ability to identify and assess the health needs of the entire university student population
  • Experience delivering presentations targeting health promotion, with demonstrated knowledge of population health concerns and up-to-date industry changes and campaigns

To ensure that the University continues to provide a safe environment for all, this position requires the incumbent to hold an up-to-date and valid working with children verification.

Benefits of working with us

In addition to having the opportunity to grow and meet challenges, and to be part of a vibrant campus life, our employees enjoy a range of rewarding benefits:

  • Flexible work arrangements and generous personal, parental and cultural leaves
  • Competitive remuneration, 17% super, salary package and leave loading
  • Free and subsidized health and wellness services, and access to fitness and cultural clubs
  • Discounts on a wide range of products and services, including Myki and Qantas Club cards
  • Career development opportunities and 25% off graduate courses for staff and their immediate families

Learn more at https://about.unimelb.edu.au/careers/staff-benefits.

Be yourself

At UoM, we value the unique backgrounds, experiences and contributions each person brings to our community, and we encourage and celebrate diversity. Indigenous Australians, those who identify as LGBTQIA+, women, people of all ages and from diverse cultures are encouraged to apply for our roles. Our goal is to create a workforce that reflects the community in which we live.

Join us!

If you think this position is right for you, please apply with your resume and a cover letter outlining your interests and experience. Please note that you are not required to provide answers against the selection criteria in the job description.

If you require reasonable adjustments with the recruitment process, please contact the Talent Acquisition team at hr-talent@unimelb.edu.au.

Due to the impacts of COVID-19, we are currently prioritizing applicants with valid work rights in Australia and applicants who are not affected by travel restrictions. Please see the latest updates to Australia’s immigration and border arrangements: https://covid19.homeaffairs.gov.au/

Job Description : 0042981 Health Promotion Coordinator, PD.pdf

Closing of applications: MARCH 23, 2022 11:55 PM AUS Eastern Daylight Time

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‘Queen of population health’ Christine Newman retires after 45 years – thepulse.org.au https://surroundhealth.net/queen-of-population-health-christine-newman-retires-after-45-years-thepulse-org-au/ Sun, 27 Feb 2022 21:07:21 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/queen-of-population-health-christine-newman-retires-after-45-years-thepulse-org-au/ “Among the reasons we love her – this woman is real; she is grounded and trustworthy, zealously respected. This is just one of 33 fun and complementary lines in the incredible farewell poem written for Christine Newman, outgoing Deputy Director for Population Health at Western Sydney Local Health District (WSLHD). Christine is a beloved colleague […]]]>

“Among the reasons we love her – this woman is real; she is grounded and trustworthy, zealously respected.

This is just one of 33 fun and complementary lines in the incredible farewell poem written for Christine Newman, outgoing Deputy Director for Population Health at Western Sydney Local Health District (WSLHD).

Christine is a beloved colleague with an impressive career spanning five decades in healthcare – highlights of which include making our roads, hospital grounds and medicine containers safer.

She dedicated nearly 20 years of that career to population health, earning the title “queen of population health” from her colleague and poetry writer Belinda Duckworth of the health promotion team.

Other areas of interest have included injury prevention and monitoring, domestic violence advocacy, gynecology, cardiology and endocrinology.

Christine’s career began in 1975 as a medical receptionist at Northern Beaches in Sydney. As a registered nurse she spent time in Scotland and England, and within two years of returning to Australia joined the emergency department team at Westmead Hospital. Since then she has been working in Western Sydney.

One of Christine’s fondest memories is the end of her nursing training and the ceremony that surrounded it.

It was the most amazing thing; there was so much pomp about it – the veil, the certificate, tossing your training hat and stomping it to the floor, the ball thrown from the previous year; it was so special,” she recalls.

In early 2000, Christine received a Masters in Public Administration scholarship from the Prime Minister and Cabinet Office, giving her the opportunity to learn how to work in government and move away from silos. She cites this as a highlight that has provided her with the contacts, tools and knowledge to really help her drive innovation and change in health and other organizations.

Christine’s career highlights are not only her professional accomplishments of which she is most proud, but are also legacies of the WSLHD.

She implemented ER injury surveillance across the WSLHD, a first in Australia. The data collected has provided vital information to various government departments, helping to make key changes such as reducing speed limits on roads in New South Wales and adding extra safety precautions to methadone containers.

Christine also led one of the country’s first pilot projects for Australia’s Western Sydney Early Development Census, which is now a national initiative used to provide insight into child development to inform communities and support planning, policy and action.

Other projects of note include the implementation of Labor Development Orders with legal aid, which to date helps support disadvantaged people, and the promotion of the implementation of anti-tobacco policies throughout the district.

Throughout her many roles, Christine ensured that the community was at the center of everything she did, because “at the heart of it all, it’s people that matter.” This has been especially true throughout the COVID-19 pandemic.

Christine is the engine room of the Center and it has never been more visible than in the past two years,” said Shopna Bag, Acting Director of Population Health WSLHD.

“It is through his dedication, tireless support and fearless leadership that we have been able to weather the storms to get to where we are today.

“With staff coming from all over the district to join the Center for Population Health, feedback was unanimous that they valued the team culture, our teamwork and felt it was one of the best teams in which they had worked.

“It is at the heart of his legacy and his contributions to the Centre’s success and achievements are immeasurable.”

Christine at the opening of the Blacktown Vaccination Center in 2021.

Christine said she will miss WSLHD for her willingness to take measured risks and work in a supportive and exciting environment. He will also miss his partnerships with various government agencies and his “incredible” health promotion team.

The feeling is mutual, Michelle Nolan, acting head of health promotion, said:
“Christine taught us what makes a great leader and gave us so much to aspire to.

“His real, approachable, honest and compassionate approach to our work and our team is appreciated by all of us.”

Happy retirement Christine!

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Apply the principles of health promotion in nursing practice https://surroundhealth.net/apply-the-principles-of-health-promotion-in-nursing-practice/ Mon, 21 Feb 2022 08:21:54 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/apply-the-principles-of-health-promotion-in-nursing-practice/ Angela Wood Senior Lecturer in Health and Social Care, School of Health and Human Sciences, University of Bolton, Bolton, England Why you should read this article: • Refresh your knowledge of the definition and principles of health promotion • Improve your understanding of the frameworks and models that underpin health promotion • To […]]]>

Angela Wood Senior Lecturer in Health and Social Care, School of Health and Human Sciences, University of Bolton, Bolton, England



Why you should read this article:

  • Refresh your knowledge of the definition and principles of health promotion

  • Improve your understanding of the frameworks and models that underpin health promotion

  • To help you provide effective patient health promotion in your nursing practice

Health promotion is a relatively new concept based on the definition of health proposed in 1946 by the World Health Organization. The thinking behind health promotion moves away from the biomedical model of health and considers how biological, psychological and social factors interact to affect the health and health outcomes of individuals, communities and population groups. . An accurate and thorough understanding of what health means to people and how health is experienced enables health professionals, planners and decision makers to develop and implement health promotion interventions that prevent suboptimal health and address health inequities. This article describes the concepts, frameworks, and models that underpin health promotion and discusses the different types of health promotion interventions that can be applied in nursing practice.

Nursing Standard.
do I: 10.7748/ns.2022.e11774

Peer review

This article has undergone external double-blind peer review and plagiarism check using automated software

@AdWadmh

Correspondence

a.woods@bolton.ac.uk

Conflict of interest

None declared

Woods A (2022) Applying the principles of health promotion to nursing practice. Nursing standard. doi:10.7748/ns.2022.e11774

Online: February 21, 2022

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UMass Center for Public Health Promotion COVID-19 Update: February 17 https://surroundhealth.net/umass-center-for-public-health-promotion-covid-19-update-february-17/ Thu, 17 Feb 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/umass-center-for-public-health-promotion-covid-19-update-february-17/ Public Health Promotion Center (PHPC) co-directors Ann Becker and Jeffrey Hescock have emailed the campus community with updates on the university’s COVID-19 positivity rate, to announce the continuation of the indoor masking policy on campus and with clinical vaccine information. This email is as follows: Dear campus community, We continue to monitor COVID-19 trends in […]]]>

Public Health Promotion Center (PHPC) co-directors Ann Becker and Jeffrey Hescock have emailed the campus community with updates on the university’s COVID-19 positivity rate, to announce the continuation of the indoor masking policy on campus and with clinical vaccine information.

This email is as follows:

Dear campus community,

We continue to monitor COVID-19 trends in our community through our symptomatic, adaptive and voluntary screening program as well as sewage monitoring. The latest COVID-19 testing data for the UMass community from February 9-15 shows 456 new positive cases. The university’s cumulative positivity rate is 7.38%, up from 7.76% last week. The state’s seven-day positivity rate is 2.90%.

Those who test positive continue to report that they have minimal to moderate symptoms of infection, and there are no hospitalizations to report. The cases mainly concern undergraduate students linked to unmasked social activities. We recognize that we remain above regional and state positivity rates, but are encouraged by the slight drop in positivity this week. Although tracking the number of cases in a highly vaccinated population has become less important for assessing campus health, it remains a valuable metric.

Throughout the pandemic, we have made our decisions based on federal and state guidelines as well as local conditions and the unique aspects of community living on a large residential campus. We are monitoring the evolution of mask-wearing guidelines and will incorporate them into our assessment of specific situations on our campus and local community. Based on current conditions, our inner mask requirement remains in effect.

In the meantime, we must continue to do what is necessary to protect our community. The UMass community is invited to come to the Campus Center Public Health Promotion Center to pick up KN95 masks and test kits each week, as we have a sufficient supply.

We also continue to hold COVID-19 vaccination clinics two days a week. Vaccination clinics are offered Wednesdays from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. and Thursdays from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. until March 10. Walk-ins will be accepted, but we encourage everyone to make an appointment.

Please continue to monitor yourself daily for symptoms of COVID-19 before coming to campus. If you don’t feel well, stay home and get tested. UHS offers symptomatic testing for students, or if you have an unobserved test kit, you can drop it off at one of the campus kiosks.

Thank you for all you do to take care of yourself and each other, and to support the health of our community.

Truly,

Co-Directors of the Public Health Promotion Center (PHPC)

Ann Becker, Director of Public Health
Jeffrey Hescock, Executive Director of Environment, Health and Safety

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UMass Center for Public Health Promotion COVID-19 Update: February 10 https://surroundhealth.net/umass-center-for-public-health-promotion-covid-19-update-february-10/ Thu, 10 Feb 2022 22:27:02 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/umass-center-for-public-health-promotion-covid-19-update-february-10/ In a weekly email to Public Health Promotion Center (PHPC) Campus Community Co-Directors Ann Becker and Jeffrey Hescock, address the campus’ COVID positivity rate, vaccination clinics, and availability of KN95 masks and unobserved test kits. This email is as follows: Dear campus community, As we wrap up the third week of the spring semester, we […]]]>

In a weekly email to Public Health Promotion Center (PHPC) Campus Community Co-Directors Ann Becker and Jeffrey Hescock, address the campus’ COVID positivity rate, vaccination clinics, and availability of KN95 masks and unobserved test kits.

This email is as follows:

Dear campus community,

As we wrap up the third week of the spring semester, we see campus life leading to an anticipated increase in positive COVID-19 cases. We continue to monitor COVID trends in our community through our symptomatic and adaptive testing programs and our sewage monitoring. At our highly immunized campus, these cases occur primarily in our undergraduate students who report having minimal to moderate symptoms of infection. No hospitalizations to report.

The Public Health Promotion Center (PHPC) continues to hold COVID-19 vaccination clinics two days a week at the Center on campus. This week, vaccination clinics are offered on Thursdays and Fridays from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. Starting next week, vaccination clinics will be offered on Wednesdays from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. and Thursdays from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. until March 10. Walk-ins are accepted, but we encourage everyone to make an appointment.

The latest COVID-19 testing data for the UMass community from February 2-8 shows 416 new positive cases. The university’s cumulative positivity rate is 7.45%, up from 4.48% last week. The state’s seven-day positivity rate is 4.08%. A similar increase in cases was seen at other universities at the start of the semester.

The UMass cases primarily involve undergraduates linked to unmasked social activities, based on contact tracing assessments. We must all remain vigilant by following key public health protocols in place, including our indoor mask requirement. The UMass community is invited to pick up free KN95 masks each week at PHPC at Campus Center.

The majority of positive cases are people who show symptoms of COVID and use the unobserved convenient test kit. Please continue to monitor yourself daily for symptoms of COVID-19 before coming to campus. If you don’t feel well, stay home and get tested. University Health Services offers symptomatic testing for students, or if you have an unobserved test kit, you can drop it off at one of the campus kiosks.

Thank you for all you do to take care of yourself and each other, and to support the health of our community.

Truly,

Co-Directors of the Public Health Promotion Center (PHPC)

Ann Becker, Director of Public Health
Jeffrey Hescock, Executive Director of Environment, Health and Safety

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Health and Wellness Promotion is accepting applications for Peer Educators https://surroundhealth.net/health-and-wellness-promotion-is-accepting-applications-for-peer-educators/ Fri, 28 Jan 2022 15:39:51 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/health-and-wellness-promotion-is-accepting-applications-for-peer-educators/ UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. — Health Promotion and Wellness (HPW), a student affairs unit at Penn State, is seeking candidates for HealthWorks, an outreach and peer education program designed to promote healthy behaviors among University students. Park. Applications for the 2022-23 academic year are currently being accepted until March 4. HealthWorks enables students interested in health […]]]>

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. — Health Promotion and Wellness (HPW), a student affairs unit at Penn State, is seeking candidates for HealthWorks, an outreach and peer education program designed to promote healthy behaviors among University students. Park. Applications for the 2022-23 academic year are currently being accepted until March 4.

HealthWorks enables students interested in health and wellness to get involved on campus and earn credits. Through the program, students have the unique opportunity to facilitate individual wellness services with peers regarding stress and time management, physical activity, nutrition, sleep, sexual health, and healthy relationships. ; or host educational workshops and awareness events (e.g., Love Your Body Week), staff outreach tables, attend healthy cooking demonstrations, write content for Healthy Penn State social media, and provide advice on HIV testing. During the application process, students will be able to prioritize the opportunities that interest them the most.

Participation in the program involves a minimum commitment of three semesters – one training semester and two service semesters – meaning that applying students should plan to graduate in December 2023 or later.

Training for the program requires completion of a three-credit course in biobehavioral health, which is offered during the fall semester. Topics covered in the course include alcohol and other drugs, sexual health, nutrition, physical activity, sleep, stress, and other health topics relevant to the college population. There are no prerequisites to enroll in the course. After successfully completing the training course, students complete 45 hours of service each semester.

For more information about HealthWorks or to apply, visit HPW’s HealthWorks webpage. Applicants will be notified of their status by March 25.

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UMass Center for Public Health Promotion COVID-19 Update https://surroundhealth.net/umass-center-for-public-health-promotion-covid-19-update/ Thu, 27 Jan 2022 22:38:19 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/umass-center-for-public-health-promotion-covid-19-update/ Dear campus community, We were very happy to welcome students back to campus this week. With a full set of public health protocols in place to manage the impact of COVID-19, we welcome the start of the spring semester. Vaccination remains the best public health measure to combat COVID-19. Although vaccines do not prevent all […]]]>

Dear campus community,

We were very happy to welcome students back to campus this week. With a full set of public health protocols in place to manage the impact of COVID-19, we welcome the start of the spring semester.

Vaccination remains the best public health measure to combat COVID-19. Although vaccines do not prevent all infections, they have been shown to be very effective in preventing serious illnesses and hospitalizations. Earlier this week, we held two large-scale booster clinics and will continue to provide convenient access to vaccines. The Public Health Promotion Center (PHPC) plans to hold immunization clinics every Thursday and Friday from 3:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. at the Center on campus. Walk-ins are accepted, but we encourage everyone to make an appointment.

This week, we also distributed KN95 masks to campus departments, schools, colleges and residence halls. Faculty, staff and students can also drop by PHPC during business hours to pick up two masks per person. We strongly advise you to use a high-end mask, such as an N95, KN95 or KF94, or a double mask with a surgical mask under a cloth mask.

With the start of the semester, we received inquiries about testing protocols. Our approach to testing has been one of the most rigorous and effective aspects of the university’s pandemic mitigation efforts, and that commitment continues. With the development of vaccines over the past two years, our testing scheme has evolved to better respond to changing conditions.

Previously, the main purpose of surveillance testing (testing everyone) was to identify people with COVID and isolate them from the community. In a vaccinated and boosted population, the tests have different purposes. We now employ a combination of more effective measures. These are particularly valuable given how quickly the Omicron variant spreads, as the majority of people who test regularly are not identified as positive during their peak contagion period. Our current approach includes continuous campus-wide wastewater testing, providing accurate, real-time assessment of infectivity. Adaptive tests are then deployed on populations with increased infectiousness to identify individual cases. Meanwhile, hands-on, unobserved voluntary testing is available and used regularly by the campus community. This comprehensive approach provides PHPC with enhanced tools to continuously analyze the status of the virus on our campus and adopt real-time COVID mitigation measures to keep our campus and surrounding communities safe. These testing protocols, used in concert with our vaccination and masking policies, are designed to create a safe environment for everyone, including vulnerable people with health conditions and families with young children at home who are not not vaccinated.

The latest COVID-19 testing data for the UMass community from January 19 to January 25 shows 191 new positive cases. The university’s cumulative positivity rate is 2.58%, down from last week’s rate of 6.33%. The state’s seven-day positivity rate is 10.37%. Most cases are short-lived and result in mild to moderate illness, and there are currently no hospitalizations.

Everyone should continue to monitor themselves daily for symptoms of COVID-19 before coming to campus. If you don’t feel well, stay home.

Thank you for all you do to take care of yourself and each other, and to support the health of our community.

Truly,

Co-Directors of the Public Health Promotion Center (PHPC)

Ann Becker, Director of Public Health
Jeffrey Hescock, Executive Director of Environment, Health and Safety

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