health approach – Surround Health http://surroundhealth.net/ Tue, 22 Feb 2022 15:23:08 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://surroundhealth.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-68-120x120.png health approach – Surround Health http://surroundhealth.net/ 32 32 ‘Population Health’ hopes to foster health equity at UH https://surroundhealth.net/population-health-hopes-to-foster-health-equity-at-uh/ Thu, 10 Feb 2022 21:08:16 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/population-health-hopes-to-foster-health-equity-at-uh/ By Haya Panjwani February 10, 2022 Juana Garcia / The Cougar UH launched a initiative called “Population Health” with the goal of creating health equity in Houston and the state. Led by the University’s population health officer, Bettina Beech, the program aims to address health issues by addressing areas such as diet, behaviors, the environment […]]]>


Juana Garcia / The Cougar

UH launched a initiative called “Population Health” with the goal of creating health equity in Houston and the state.

Led by the University’s population health officer, Bettina Beech, the program aims to address health issues by addressing areas such as diet, behaviors, the environment and the health system in its together.

“The way I like to explain it is that population health is sort of a bridge between public health and medicine,” Beech said. “It’s a way of taking the principles and sensitivities of public health, which look at large groups, the general population, but then translating them into medicine, looking at subgroups rather than individuals.”

Right now, medical professionals are looking at issues one patient at a time, according to Beech. Through this new initiative, UH hopes to examine patient panels and groups to address health issues.

Health care now needs to look at panels of patients within groups of patients, but that’s not the direction of medicine,” Beech said. “’Population health‘ is sort of a bridge between the two, with an intense focus on health equity. »

The initiative comes in response to improving the health of all populations and the hope of creating equity in health, Beech said.

“In order to really improve the health of populations, we really need changes that happen throughout our lives,” she said. “So we need healthy housing, we need accessible transportation, we need safe and equitable health care.”

The initiative will then integrate majors across UH to help achieve this goal that the initiative hopes to achieve.

“By bringing population health into all disciplines, we will train graduate architects who create healthier buildings and design healthier buildings,” Beech said. “We will have business people who keep these principles in mind when working in their industry, we will have medical graduates who better understand a population health approach and how to incorporate it into their clinical practice .

Beech hopes this initiative will have a lasting impact on the people of the city and state.

[email protected]

Key words: health care, health equity, population health


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From Concept to Action: A Solidarity, Holistic and One Health Approach to Responding to the Climate Change Crisis | Infectious diseases of poverty https://surroundhealth.net/from-concept-to-action-a-solidarity-holistic-and-one-health-approach-to-responding-to-the-climate-change-crisis-infectious-diseases-of-poverty/ Thu, 10 Feb 2022 12:58:27 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/from-concept-to-action-a-solidarity-holistic-and-one-health-approach-to-responding-to-the-climate-change-crisis-infectious-diseases-of-poverty/ Climate change is one of the greatest threats to humanity in the 21st century [1]. It was stressed that there is an urgent need to further study the direct and indirect links of climate change with natural, biological and other human-induced hazards. This will facilitate better identification and understanding of cascading and complex hazards and […]]]>

Climate change is one of the greatest threats to humanity in the 21st century [1]. It was stressed that there is an urgent need to further study the direct and indirect links of climate change with natural, biological and other human-induced hazards. This will facilitate better identification and understanding of cascading and complex hazards and risks in a systematic way to address climate change as a hazard driver. [2]. The move towards a broader view and a more context-dependent definition of hazards requires a systematic approach to risk that considers hazard, vulnerability, exposure and capacity together and better understands their interaction. complex.

Climate change is a global problem that transcends national borders. Tackling climate change requires intense international coordination and cooperation, as recognized by the United Nations (UN) in 2015 when adopting the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030, sustainable development of the 2030 Agenda and the Paris Agreement on climate change. [3,4,5]. Since then, more and more international organizations and partners are implementing cross-cutting actions and services to address the threat of climate change and disaster risk reduction for sustainable development. For example, the United Nations-wide initiative, Global Framework for Climate Services, led by the World Meteorological Organization with the World Health Organization (WHO), the World Bank, the United Nations Development, International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies, United Nations International Strategy for Disaster Reduction, World Food Programme, United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, United Nations United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) directly involved, publish annual reports on the state of climate services. These reports aim to “facilitate the development and application of adaptation needs assessment methodologies”, in particular for risk information and early warning systems. [6].

While slowing climate change is a priority, adapting to climate change and trying to do our best to protect humans, animals and our shared environments from its negative impacts is urgently needed. It is clear that human health is intimately linked to the health of our environment, including animals and plants, and the ecosystems on which we all depend. The One Health approach is considered one of the best solutions for achieving optimal health and wellness results. [7]. A One Health High Level Expert Group (OHHLEP) has been set up by four international organizations (FAO, World Organization for Animal Health, UNEP and WHO) to collect, disseminate and disseminate reliable scientific information on the links between human, animal and environmental health. [8].

Understanding the nature of interconnected systemic hazards and risks is the basis of complex and cascading hazard and risk management for better prediction, preparedness and adaptation. This requires significant advances in understanding the role of anthropogenic systems, in recognizing precursor signals and associated correlations [9]. The interconnectedness of climate change, biodiversity, environmental pollution, wildlife habitats and human health demands that all of these issues be addressed as a whole, with their multiple interactions. The protection and restoration of ecosystems, as well as the wise use of its limited resources, are the essential basis for human prosperity and well-being. [10]. Recognizing this, the global community needs to better understand the link between climate change and One Health. In this short article, we emphasize the link between climate change and One Health, and offer recommendations for approaches and implementations of the One Health concept to action taking into account climate change. Here we present four key messages and recommendations with the aim of guiding future research and promoting international cooperation to achieve a more resilient world to climate change.

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One Health approach to prevent the emergence of zoonotic pathogens https://surroundhealth.net/one-health-approach-to-prevent-the-emergence-of-zoonotic-pathogens/ Thu, 03 Feb 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/one-health-approach-to-prevent-the-emergence-of-zoonotic-pathogens/ Azlan Othman In light of the continuing public health threats posed by emerging diseases and new variants of COVID-19, the ASEAN Center for Biodiversity (ACB) and the Food and Agriculture (FAO) seek to build capacity to integrate biodiversity into health frameworks and systems. ACB and FAO have signed an agreement to strengthen collaboration between the […]]]>

Azlan Othman

In light of the continuing public health threats posed by emerging diseases and new variants of COVID-19, the ASEAN Center for Biodiversity (ACB) and the Food and Agriculture (FAO) seek to build capacity to integrate biodiversity into health frameworks and systems.

ACB and FAO have signed an agreement to strengthen collaboration between the Ministries of Natural Resources Management, Forestry and Wildlife of ASEAN, within the framework of the One Health approach, with the overall aim of prevent the spread and emergence of infectious zoonotic pathogens at source.

One Health is a collaborative approach across sectors and disciplines with the aim of achieving optimal health outcomes by considering the interconnectedness between people, animals, plants and their common environment.

“The crisis caused by the COVID-19 pandemic has shed light on how our public health and well-being depend on healthy ecosystems and rich biodiversity. This partnership comes at a good time as we prepare to recover from the pandemic and build our long-term resilience in the face of similar crises,” said ACB Executive Director Theresa Mundita Lim.

Lim said that given the rich biological diversity of ASEAN, it is important for the region to be aware of the relevance of this natural wealth to reduce the risk of future pandemics, given that there could still be around 1 .7 million viruses thought to be found in various species of mammals and birds, and up to half of these could become infectious to humans.

“We are entering an era of pandemics, as scientists have warned before, and meeting ever-changing challenges requires an integrated and holistic approach, which pays due attention to our common environment,” Lim said.

The number of Omicron cases has increased exponentially across the world, leading to further impacts on lives and economies.

In response to the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, ASEAN Member States (AMS) – comprising Brunei Darussalam, Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam – adopted at the 37th ASEAN Summit in 2020 the ASEAN Comprehensive Recovery Framework (ACRF).

The ACRF provides a blueprint to guide collaborative action among partners, including ecosystem-based approaches to increase resilience to future pandemics and continued promotion of biodiversity mainstreaming across relevant sectors.

Under the agreement between ACB and FAO, a regional implementation plan will be developed that will complement existing cooperation between ASEAN and other relevant agencies.

CDA will also work with FAO on the two virtual learning center training modules being developed and aimed at promoting the importance of biodiversity, ecosystems and the environment in the veterinary and health sectors. public.

The ACB is an intergovernmental organization facilitating cooperation and coordination between the 10 AMS on the conservation and sustainable use of biological diversity and the fair and equitable sharing of the benefits arising from the use of these natural treasures.

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3 population health trends to watch in 2022 https://surroundhealth.net/3-population-health-trends-to-watch-in-2022/ Tue, 18 Jan 2022 16:47:51 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/3-population-health-trends-to-watch-in-2022/ Telehealth, efforts to address the social determinants of health, and a focus on health disparities are likely to be among the top population health priorities this year. COVID-19 will continue to cast its shadow over U.S. health care in 2022. But for population health, there’s that silver lining that people so often crave:the innovations and […]]]>

Telehealth, efforts to address the social determinants of health, and a focus on health disparities are likely to be among the top population health priorities this year.

COVID-19 will continue to cast its shadow over U.S. health care in 2022. But for population health, there’s that silver lining that people so often crave:
the innovations and adoption of telehealth that began in 2020 will continue into 2022, even as the peak in telehealth usage has waned. Providers and payers also continue to move “upstream” towards social determinants of health (SDH), investing in housing, transportation and other factors that affect people’s health but are outside of care. traditional health.

Another major item on the agenda of population health leaders next year is efforts to address health care disparities. Disparities in outcomes and access are deep-rooted problems that lend themselves to a population health approach, but not quick fixes.

1. Opt for telehealth!

Nearly two years after COVID-19 forced a telehealth revolution, patients have come to expect live video interaction offerings from their health plans and providers. Telehealth — which once meant having a live video visit with a doctor — has become a commodity, with hundreds of options now available to patients, says Sebastian Seiguer, JD, MBA, CEO of emocha Health, a medication adherence company in Baltimore that is a spin-off from Johns Hopkins. Simultaneously, the very definition of “telehealth” is changing, as consumers and providers become more familiar with using a variety of digital tools such as SMS, online portals and chatbots powered by artificial intelligence (AI) to provide personalized health advice and support.

Specifically, Jessica Sweeney-Platt, vice president of research and editorial strategy at athenahealth in Watertown, Massachusetts, expects virtual care to continue to evolve as it shifts from a reactive mode of managed from sick visits to proactive, practical and preventative care. This is especially true for patients working with care teams to manage chronic conditions. At the same time, wearable devices, which allow health monitoring at home, will gain popularity.

Along those lines, Nina Birnbaum, MD, medical director of innovation acceleration at Blue Shield of California, says more home monitoring is coming online with on-demand electrocardiograms, continuous blood glucose monitors, and further opportunities for people to actively engage in their health care. These tools should help doctors better determine the diagnostic workups and treatments needed, which could reduce costs.

An example of the telehealth economy occurred when the Fresno County, California Department of Public Health used emocha Health’s digital medication adherence program for a year. The department avoided about 110,000 vehicle miles while saving $10,000 in fuel and $100,000 in wages, Seiguer says.

Another group of products comes from companies looking to amplify existing home care models through technology. A company called Heal is looking to bring home visits back; Papa Health offers visits from health professionals and general home help for single seniors; and Ready offers emergency home care visits. These are just a few examples of emerging categories, with some players overlapping and others defining entirely new segments, Seiguer says.

Telehealth can also allow a hesitant or time-pressed person easy and quick access to care, helping to catch disease progression earlier and ultimately preventing small problems from becoming serious. big problems, says Karen Ignagni, president and CEO of EmblemHealth in New York, New York. Additionally, telehealth helps manage chronic disease and treatment adherence by providing people with quick and easy ways to inquire with providers.

The government is beginning to recognize the benefits of telehealth and, more broadly, care delivered remotely and digitally. In early November 2021, CMS provided reimbursement guidelines for a new category of digital health, remote therapy monitoring, which compensates providers for patient care outside of the doctor’s office. Health care providers have had no financial incentive to ensure their patients understand and take their medications completely and correctly. These new remote therapy monitoring codes provide reimbursement for the type of support that can lead to greater compliance, Seiguer says.

2. An eye on SDOH

An emerging trend in the fight against SDH is to focus more on analyzing barriers to care at the population level, and then investing in community-based programs that can have the greatest impact on the greatest number of people. Sweeney-Platt says providers and payers both have hurdles to overcome.

“While provider organizations are leading these conversations — especially those who have taken Medicare Advantage or managed Medicaid risk — they don’t always have the resources to create programs,” she observes. “Payers have also invested in these types of programs, but have struggled with low uptake. This leaves many opportunities for collaboration between payer and provider.

SDOH presents problems that cannot be solved peripherally, experts say. “Successful organizations are those that can combine sophisticated network-level analytics to identify hotspot practices with common sets of needs, with deep local knowledge of community resources and partnerships,” Sweeney-Platt observes. .

One of the biggest challenges, she adds, is figuring out who pays for these programs. Robert Bollinger, MD, MPH, professor of infectious diseases at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and one of the inventors of emocha Health’s licensed technology, says healthcare institutions should engage in strategic partnerships with the public -private with government and non-government programs (eg, Medicaid, community/faith organizations) to address SDOH issues. He also says they need to push for more resources to support SDOH’s efforts.

3. Address disparities

There is a lot of overlap between managing SDOH and reducing health care disparity gaps. Bollinger says it’s important to remember that any population health effort to address SDOH must also consider racial discrimination — in society as a whole as well as in health care. He listed some steps that leaders of healthcare entities can take to begin to address disparities:

  • Prioritize measuring and reporting health disparities based on race and other SDOH factors within their clinics, facilities, digital programs, and among providers.
  • Build meaningful partnerships with trusted community partners – churches, local politicians – to enable patients and members to play an important role in shaping solutions to address these disparities.
  • Make racial equity a strategic priority for an entire organization. Many organizations are emphasizing and implementing training, cultural competency, or workforce diversity initiatives. But training alone is not enough. “Fairness should be more than a standing topic for every C-suite meeting, leadership meeting, and program,” Bollinger says.

Christopher Dodd, MD, chief medical officer of PopHealthCare in Franklin, Tennessee, and its home care company, Emcara Health, says Emcara deploys advanced home-based primary care teams that include culturally aligned community health workers. “This approach allows us to build trusting relationships with members of the underserved community,” says Dodd. This model, along with understanding the social and environmental factors affecting health, helps prevent serious and costly health problems before they occur, he adds.

Karen Appold is a medical writer in the Lehigh Valley area of ​​Pennsylvania.

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A One Health approach to realizing the global health agenda – The European Sting – Critical News & Insights on European Politics, Economy, Foreign Affairs, Business & Technology https://surroundhealth.net/a-one-health-approach-to-realizing-the-global-health-agenda-the-european-sting-critical-news-insights-on-european-politics-economy-foreign-affairs-business-technology/ Mon, 27 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/a-one-health-approach-to-realizing-the-global-health-agenda-the-european-sting-critical-news-insights-on-european-politics-economy-foreign-affairs-business-technology/ (Credit: Unsplash) This article was written exclusively for The European Sting by Ms. Sadia Khalid, Junior Researcher and PhD student at Tallinn University of Technology (TalTech), Estonia. It is affiliated with the International Federation of Medical Students’ Associations (IFMSA), a cordial partner of The Sting. The opinions expressed in this article belong strictly to the […]]]>
(Credit: Unsplash)

This article was written exclusively for The European Sting by Ms. Sadia Khalid, Junior Researcher and PhD student at Tallinn University of Technology (TalTech), Estonia. It is affiliated with the International Federation of Medical Students’ Associations (IFMSA), a cordial partner of The Sting. The opinions expressed in this article belong strictly to the author and do not necessarily reflect IFMSA’s point of view on the subject, nor that of The European Sting.


One of the main aspects of the global health agenda is to unify two difficult areas of our time; interdependence and globalization and to develop strategies that tackle growing inequalities within and between nations.

One Health is a multidisciplinary and multisectoral approach to achieving optimal health. this approach provides opportunities to use collaborative skills to address complex health threats by recognizing the interconnectedness between humans, animals, plants and their common environment.

Contemporaneous with the emphasis on the need for strategic planning at national and international levels for zoonotic diseases, food security, antimicrobial resistance and climate change, we observe in clinical practice and in faculty of medicine that its application is largely absent, which would be an obstacle to achieving the global health agenda.

Participation and benefits of One Health for medical schools and global health centers can be achieved by: 1) Disseminating and improving access to information, tools, guidance, literature reviews, protocols and resources already existing ones available in communities practicing One Health.
2) a small team at an institute dedicated to directing faculty and students to helpful One Health resources. 3) Use entry points such as lesson plans or special workshops/courses or posts on the institute website/social media pages to activate a health resource.
4) Use available platforms (eg MOOCs) for equitable access to information globally.
5)Incorporate innovative teaching methods and advanced assessment methods and tools for better support of students working in interdisciplinary teams.
6) Encourage students to participate in public and global health conferences, free monthly CDC webinars on a health topic, and enable the incorporation of relevant information on that topic on relevant ecological and epidemiological factors for disease risk in tools commonly used by the medical community (e.g., Medscape).
7) To pave the way for the effective flow of information not only within the medical and health community, but also for the dissemination of information outside its immediate domain for an equitable penetration of knowledge for the global health agenda. health.
8) Ensure appropriate management of the information chain to exploit front-line reports on data and responses from all disciplines to be put in place. Careful consideration should be given to the design, operation, and workflow needs of the channel, as well as the usefulness of potential users.
9) Develop innovative partnerships such as connecting students and professors from different departments through collaborative research exchange programs, multidisciplinary training, integrated curriculum, interdisciplinary events. It will respond to the needs for improving health status, including at the community level. It is essential to identify entry points and key competencies for applied training and health practitioners for problem-solving skills in engaging One Health strategies. Finally, a clear plan of action and rationale for promoting and developing One Health policies in the sector is of the utmost importance, as the One Health approach to informing solutions for the agenda can only be achieved by empowering and training health professionals to better identify and communicate emergencies. public health threats.

These goals would be a valuable contribution to already existing metrics, resources and stakeholders through more holistic and effective service delivery and will allow us to better manage the determinants of poor health. Therefore, we believe that the global health agenda can be achieved by important actors such as medical and global health educators, practitioners and students who explore and integrate the One Health approach locally and globally in their work.

CONFLICT OF INTEREST:

The authors declare that there is no conflict of interest.

The references:

Machalaba CC, Salerno RH, Barton Behravesh C, et al. Institutionalizing One Health: From Assessment to Action. Health Safety. 2018; 16(S1): S37–S43. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1089/hs.2018.0064

Machalaba, C. et al, 2021. Applying a One Health Approach in Global Health and Medicine: Strengthening the Engagement of Medical Schools and Global Health Centers. Annals of Global Health, 87(1), p.30. DOI: http://doi.org/10.5334/aogh.2647

About the Author

Sadia Khalid, Junior Researcher and PhD student at Tallinn University of Technology (TalTech), Estonia. She is working on her research project “The role of the intestinal microbiota Helicobacter pylori in the development of liver diseases. under the supervision of Dr. Pirjo Spuul from the Faculty of Science, Institute of Chemistry and Biotechnology.TalTech. Previously, she worked as a Transgeno Project Specialist under the supervision of Professor Ali Reza at the University of Tartu, Estonia. She received her PhD in Emergency Medicine in 2017 from Dalian Medical University, China and her MBChB in 2013 from Weifang Medical University, China. His current research interests include infectious diseases, bacteriology, hepatology and gastroenterology.

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One Health: a beacon of hope for the future world – The European Sting – Critical News & Insights on European Politics, Economy, Foreign Affairs, Business & Technology https://surroundhealth.net/one-health-a-beacon-of-hope-for-the-future-world-the-european-sting-critical-news-insights-on-european-politics-economy-foreign-affairs-business-technology/ Fri, 10 Dec 2021 06:00:00 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/one-health-a-beacon-of-hope-for-the-future-world-the-european-sting-critical-news-insights-on-european-politics-economy-foreign-affairs-business-technology/ [ad_1] (Credit: Unsplash) This article was written exclusively for The European Sting by Ms. Jannatul Ferdous Tonny, fourth year medical student at Sylhet MAG Osmani Medical College, Bangladesh. It is affiliated with the International Federation of Medical Students’ Associations (IFMSA), a cordial partner of The Sting. The opinions expressed in this article are strictly the […]]]>


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(Credit: Unsplash)

This article was written exclusively for The European Sting by Ms. Jannatul Ferdous Tonny, fourth year medical student at Sylhet MAG Osmani Medical College, Bangladesh. It is affiliated with the International Federation of Medical Students’ Associations (IFMSA), a cordial partner of The Sting. The opinions expressed in this article are strictly the author’s and do not necessarily reflect the views of IFMSA on the subject, nor of The European Sting.


The concept of “One Health” describes the idea that human and animal health are interconnected and linked to the health of the ecosystems in which they live. One Health provides the opportunity to recognize shared interests, set common goals, and foster teamwork for the benefit of the overall health of the world.

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), one or more new infectious diseases have appeared each year since the 1970s. The majority of these were zoonoses. Zoonotic pathogens can be bacterial, viral or parasitic, or can involve unconventional agents and can be spread to humans through direct contact or through food, water or the environment. 60% of pathogens that cause human disease come from domestic animals or wildlife and 75% of emerging human pathogens are of animal origin. Recent examples of new and emerging diseases in animals and humans (Covid-19, Ebola, Middle East respiratory syndrome, avian influenza (H5N1), swine influenza (H1NI), severe acute respiratory syndrome) show how The balance is rapidly changing and how vulnerable humans are, animals and crops are at the center of disease.

With the complexity of diseases and their emergence & spread in an increasingly globalized world, it is essential to find effective strategies to control them at their source in order to reduce their potentially devastating impact on health. This can only happen through multisectoral collaboration; with well-structured and resilient health systems that prioritize prevention. Known as One Health, this approach has garnered increasing attention over the past decade among policymakers, practitioners and funders seeking more effective prevention, control and treatment responses in an increasingly populated and globalized world.

The problem, however, is that significant gaps remain in the implementation of the One Health approach at subnational administrative levels; there are sustainability issues, competing priorities and funding gaps.

A major challenge in implementing the One Health approach in developing countries is the weak links between the different ministries and agencies responsible for human and animal health and the environment.

An interdepartmental, multi-agency approach to policymaking, surveillance, epidemic response, prevention and control could set the stage towards institutionalizing effective collaboration One Health in Government and partners. The One Health approach can also contribute to food safety and other national priorities encompassed in the health, nutrition and population sector, which can ultimately lead us to achieve the global health agenda. .

The current COVID-19 pandemic is a devastating reminder that mitigating the threat of emerging zoonotic epidemics rests on our collective ability to work in human health, animal health and the environment.

A One Health approach can achieve the best health outcomes for people, animals and plants in a shared environment. Let’s make our future world safer for us by promoting collaboration in all sectors.

About the Author

Jannatul Ferdous Tonny is a fourth year medical student at Sylhet MAG Osmani Medical College, Bangladesh. She is a member of the SCORE Supervisory Board of IFMSA and also works as National Research Exchange Manager of BMSS, an NMO of IFMSA. She believes in making changes for the advancement of the future world. Her passion for medicine makes her praise herself for better accessibility to healthcare, preventive health and empowerment of the public with accurate and reliable medical information. She has great expertise in facilitating sessions on promoting research and learning. She embarked on a plan to change the roots of research teaching.

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Liberia making progress towards One Health goals – FrontPageAfrica https://surroundhealth.net/liberia-making-progress-towards-one-health-goals-frontpageafrica/ Tue, 30 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/liberia-making-progress-towards-one-health-goals-frontpageafrica/ Liberia has made tremendous strides towards its One Health agenda, efforts that prompted international partners who gathered at this year’s World One Health Day celebration to shower the country with praise. Partners, including the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), GIZ and AFENET-Liberia, commended the country for adapting and advancing the global […]]]>

Liberia has made tremendous strides towards its One Health agenda, efforts that prompted international partners who gathered at this year’s World One Health Day celebration to shower the country with praise.

Partners, including the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), GIZ and AFENET-Liberia, commended the country for adapting and advancing the global concept, which seeks to work concerted way to address shared health threats at the human-animal-environment interface.

One Health is a collaborative, multisectoral and transdisciplinary approach – working at local, regional, national and global levels – with the aim of achieving optimal health outcomes recognizing the interconnectedness between people, animals, plants and their shared environment. .

The government has since started work on preparing a One Health governance manual that would ensure the concept, endorsed globally in 2016 in the wake of the Ebola virus disease outbreak, is domesticated as a national policy. The manual is currently being revised to ensure that it will be adopted quickly. The program grew out of lessons learned from the Ebola crisis that devastated Liberia and its neighbors Sierra Leone and Guinea.

A Joint Risk Assessment and One Health Policy Mapping and Analysis Study for Liberia funded under the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) project is also underway.

“All of these initiatives are aimed at ensuring that Liberia achieves its One Health goal,” FAO team leader Dr Ibrahim Ahmed said at the weekend celebration. assessment and mapping study and policy analysis OH. Dr Ahmed spoke on behalf of his patron, the FAO Country Representative, Mariatou N’jei.

“We want to pursue a richer world, so it is necessary to prioritize the welfare of not only humanity, but also animals, as well as the environment,” he noted.

Within the framework of a single sanitary context of detection, control and prevention of zoonotic diseases, FAO recently finalized the construction and equipment of the Animal Quarantine Center including a laboratory in Ganta which was finally handed over to the government.

The weekend event was also a combined celebration of World Rabies Day (WRD), One Health Day (OHD) and World Antimicrobial Awareness Week (WAAW).

OHD provides an opportunity for experts and the community to unite in One Health education and awareness. Communication, coordination and collaboration between partners working in animal, human and environmental health as well as other relevant areas is an essential part of the One Health approach, One Health Platform, the national group that leads the initiative, said during the celebration. “Working together allows us to have the greatest impact on improving the health of people, animals and our common environment,” noted a group official.

This global health concept strives to achieve optimal health outcomes by recognizing the interaction between people, animals, plants and their shared environment, and according to GIZ Health Director Daniel Lohmann, it is needed not only to support the idea, but also to educate the public and other stakeholders about One Health and share experiences, resources and challenges.

“GIZ works in three counties in the South East and this is the idea we are promoting there,” he said.

“We don’t take good care of the environment and that’s why we sometimes suffer backlashes with the outbreak of diseases and the impacts of climate change. Everything is interconnected and so we have to take care of everything and protect it”, Lohmann noted, “Many people may not realize the impact they can have in improving human, animal and environmental health, but everyone has a role to play.”

More pets are vaccinated

September 28, 2021 marked the 15th World Rabies Day (WRD) held under the theme “Rabies: Facts, Not Fear”. The celebration focused on sharing facts about rage and dispelling myths or misconceptions.

Activities focused not only on vaccinating dogs against rabies but also on advocacy, action and awareness.

Over 50 dogs were vaccinated to kick off rabies vaccinations for dogs throughout the year.

FAO led this exercise. “I am happy to note that these vaccinations have continued and will continue today and even long after this celebration with the aim of achieving the goal of zero rabies by 2030,” Dr Ahmed said during the weekend.

Regarding the celebration of World Antimicrobial Awareness Week, he noted that the celebration was a reminder of the rise of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) around the world as a major threat to human and animal health.

“This endangers modern human and veterinary medicine and compromises the safety of our food and our environment,” Dr Ahmed added.

Experts say the misuse of these drugs, coupled with the emergence and spread of antimicrobial resistant microorganisms, puts everyone at great risk. The risk appears particularly high in countries where legislation, regulatory oversight and monitoring systems for antimicrobial use, as well as prevention and control of antimicrobial resistance, are weak or inadequate.

FAO has played a key role in supporting governments, producers, traders and other stakeholders to move towards responsible use of antimicrobials in agriculture, thereby helping to reduce antimicrobial resistance in agricultural systems, a- he noted.

“FAO’s Action Plan on Antimicrobial Resistance addresses four main areas of intervention, including raising awareness of antimicrobial resistance and related threats; developing capacity to monitor and control antimicrobial resistance and antimicrobial use (antimicrobial use) in food and agriculture; Strengthening governance related to AMU and AMR in food and agriculture and promoting good practices in food and agricultural systems and prudent use of antimicrobials.

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One Health and the fight against antimicrobial resistance in Italy https://surroundhealth.net/one-health-and-the-fight-against-antimicrobial-resistance-in-italy/ Thu, 18 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/one-health-and-the-fight-against-antimicrobial-resistance-in-italy/ The onslaught of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a global concern for human and animal health, as well as the environment. Similar to human medicine, antimicrobials are often used in agriculture to treat or prevent infections, and the overuse and misuse of antibiotics can lead to resistant infections in animals. Because livestock ends up on people’s […]]]>

The onslaught of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a global concern for human and animal health, as well as the environment.

Similar to human medicine, antimicrobials are often used in agriculture to treat or prevent infections, and the overuse and misuse of antibiotics can lead to resistant infections in animals. Because livestock ends up on people’s tables, it creates a risk that resistant bacteria could be transmitted to humans.

Since the development and spread of AMR in humans and animals often overlaps, a multisectoral approach – “One Health” – in which the human and animal health sectors work closely together is needed to combat AMR. RAM.

How would a One Health approach to tackling antimicrobial resistance work? To answer this question, we can turn to Italy.

Animal and human health linked under the same ministry

According to Dr Annalisa Pantosti and Dr Luca Busani, who work respectively in the areas of human health and animal health at the National Institute of Health in Italy, the country is in a strong position to fight against the RAM through a One Health approach because both human health and animal health are coordinated by the same ministry, the Ministry of Health. “It’s an advantage that Italy has. It facilitates the coordination of the two sectors.

The 2 sectors have been brought together to fight against AMR within the framework of the National Action Plan on Antimicrobial Resistance (PNCAR) 2017-2020. However, the cooperation between the 2 parties is not new.

One of the best early examples of cooperation between the 2 sectors is Italy’s fight against West Nile virus from the late 1990s. At that time, it was necessary for the different parties to work together because the need was urgent, and legislation was passed to help pave the way for better integration. From then on, the government started thinking about how this integrated approach could be adapted to tackle a variety of health issues, including antimicrobial resistance.

The West Nile virus outbreaks helped launch the One Health vision in Italy – integration and better coordination between the human health and animal health sectors. It provided a preparedness system, as in the case of epidemics such as enteric pathogens, which continues to be used. However, it works primarily for the management of emerging infections, when immediate action is needed, rather than routine routine surveillance or prevention, as would be ideal.

Find common ground

Dr Busani describes what was needed to get the two parties to work together on common goals to tackle AMR, and some of the challenges they faced initially: “At first, we didn’t immediately find many common lines, mainly because the requirements of the two parties were very different. For example, the use of antimicrobials in the animal health sector is highly regulated, with strict European regulations to follow, whereas it is much less so in the field of human health.

“But we continued to work on finding common areas of interest, focusing primarily on monitoring zoonotic pathogens – such as Salmonella and Campylobacter, which are transmitted by food animals and cause infections. in humans – and monitoring the use of critically important antimicrobials in both sectors”.

Dr Pantosti describes how the integration between the two parties works in reality: “Under the first national action plan, both parties were present at coordination meetings to decide on strategies and report on results. And during these meetings, the sharing of knowledge and experiences has proven useful; veterinarians had the opportunity to learn about the burden of AMR in human medicine, while hospital doctors and general practitioners learned about the contribution of antibiotic use in farm animals to the AMR problem . Many initiatives have also been taken together, such as the promotion of European Antibiotic Awareness Day”.

Looking Ahead – “Improving the Quality of Integration”

On the future of One Health and AMR in Italy, Dr Pantosti and Dr Busani note the following: “So far, all field work, such as AMR surveillance, has followed 2 tracks parallels – the human health side and the animal health side We know what each path does and we know what the challenges are for each.

“However, what we want to do in the next national action plan, which is being developed, is to achieve deeper integration on the ground. This would require, for example, determining which aspects of monitoring are important to both parties and how interventions on one side may impact the other side.

“Once we have better identified common areas, it will be much easier to improve the quality of integration. Now that we know each other, working for common goals has become more natural for us.

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Tennessee Animal Health Division Appoints One Health Program Director https://surroundhealth.net/tennessee-animal-health-division-appoints-one-health-program-director/ Tue, 09 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/tennessee-animal-health-division-appoints-one-health-program-director/ [ad_1] The Animal Health Division of the Tennessee Department of Agriculture announces the appointment of Dr. Alexa McCourt, DVM as Director of the One Health program. One Health is a collaborative effort between veterinarians, physicians, environmental scientists, public health professionals and others to address the health challenges that affect people, animals, plants and the environment. […]]]>


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The Animal Health Division of the Tennessee Department of Agriculture announces the appointment of Dr. Alexa McCourt, DVM as Director of the One Health program.

One Health is a collaborative effort between veterinarians, physicians, environmental scientists, public health professionals and others to address the health challenges that affect people, animals, plants and the environment. Dr McCourt will oversee the department’s role in improving communication and outcomes for a variety of health issues, including emerging infectious diseases, antibiotic resistance and emergency preparedness.

“The One Health approach recognizes that the health of people is closely linked to the health of animals and our shared environment,” said State Veterinarian Dr Samantha Beaty. “As a veterinarian, Dr. McCourt knows these principles well. She will provide education and awareness, and work with experts from other state departments and veterinarians to optimize the One Health structure for the benefit of all. “

“The success of the One Health program relies on communication between all health-related disciplines,” said Dr. McCourt. “I look forward to engaging through the networks to share valuable information and promote the One Health goals. It is essential that people understand the mutual impact of human, animal and environmental health.

Dr McCourt will liaise with other One Health partners including the Tennessee Departments of Health and Environment and Conservation, Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. from USDA, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, academic institutions, and extension services.

In March 2021, Dr. McCourt joined the Department of Agriculture as a veterinarian responsible for collaborating with animal health stakeholders in Tennessee, planning for animal-related disasters and emergencies, collaborating on implementation implement state animal health programs, monitor animal regulatory issues and and develop awareness resources for the health and welfare of livestock.

Dr. McCourt received her bachelor’s degree in animal science and her doctorate in veterinary medicine from Cornell University in New York. Prior to moving to Tennessee, she was an associate veterinarian with Bovine Veterinary Services in Dexter, NM.

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Importance of one health for COVID-19 and future pandemics https://surroundhealth.net/importance-of-one-health-for-covid-19-and-future-pandemics/ Thu, 04 Nov 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/importance-of-one-health-for-covid-19-and-future-pandemics/ [ad_1] Wednesday marked the sixth annual One Health Day, a global campaign that highlights the need for a One Health approach to address common health threats by recognizing the interconnection between people, animals and our environment. This approach is more important than ever as we navigate the COVID-19 pandemic. The virus that causes COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2, […]]]>


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Wednesday marked the sixth annual One Health Day, a global campaign that highlights the need for a One Health approach to address common health threats by recognizing the interconnection between people, animals and our environment. This approach is more important than ever as we navigate the COVID-19 pandemic. The virus that causes COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2, is a zoonotic virus, which means it can spread between humans and animals. As more animals are reported infected with the COVID-19 virus, it is becoming increasingly clear that a One Health approach is crucial in addressing emerging disease threats that affect both humans and animals.

More than 400 animals from 29 countries have been reported infected, including nearly 300 animals in the United States, as well as thousands of mink in mink farms in the United States and abroad. The virus has infected pets, wildlife, zoos, and production animals, including cats, dogs, tigers, lions, gorillas, white-tailed deer, mink, and others. Most of these animals became infected after coming into contact with people with COVID-19. Although animals do not appear to play a significant role in the spread of the virus among humans at this time, One Health surveys and animal surveillance are crucial in assessing the transmission of SARS-CoV-2 between humans and animals. This will increase our understanding of the range of animals that can be infected and the risks of potential establishment of new hosts and reservoirs where the virus could hide, mutate and potentially reappear as a new variant in the human population. CDC’s One Health office works to support One Health activities and improve coordination between sectors. To complement existing public health reporting systems, the CDC has developed a surveillance and reporting infrastructure to help local, state and federal partners capture important laboratory and epidemiological data on SARS-CoV-2 cases in animals linked to people with COVID-19.

One of the lessons learned from COVID-19 is that emerging zoonotic infectious diseases are here to stay and that tackling new disease threats such as COVID-19, Ebola and Zika requires One Health collaboration between health organizations. human, animal and environmental. More information on animals and COVID-19 can be found on the CDC website and more information on the work of the CDC One Health is available on the One Health page.

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