covid pandemic – Surround Health http://surroundhealth.net/ Mon, 28 Feb 2022 01:28:51 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://surroundhealth.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-68-120x120.png covid pandemic – Surround Health http://surroundhealth.net/ 32 32 ‘Queen of population health’ Christine Newman retires after 45 years – thepulse.org.au https://surroundhealth.net/queen-of-population-health-christine-newman-retires-after-45-years-thepulse-org-au/ Sun, 27 Feb 2022 21:07:21 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/queen-of-population-health-christine-newman-retires-after-45-years-thepulse-org-au/ “Among the reasons we love her – this woman is real; she is grounded and trustworthy, zealously respected. This is just one of 33 fun and complementary lines in the incredible farewell poem written for Christine Newman, outgoing Deputy Director for Population Health at Western Sydney Local Health District (WSLHD). Christine is a beloved colleague […]]]>

“Among the reasons we love her – this woman is real; she is grounded and trustworthy, zealously respected.

This is just one of 33 fun and complementary lines in the incredible farewell poem written for Christine Newman, outgoing Deputy Director for Population Health at Western Sydney Local Health District (WSLHD).

Christine is a beloved colleague with an impressive career spanning five decades in healthcare – highlights of which include making our roads, hospital grounds and medicine containers safer.

She dedicated nearly 20 years of that career to population health, earning the title “queen of population health” from her colleague and poetry writer Belinda Duckworth of the health promotion team.

Other areas of interest have included injury prevention and monitoring, domestic violence advocacy, gynecology, cardiology and endocrinology.

Christine’s career began in 1975 as a medical receptionist at Northern Beaches in Sydney. As a registered nurse she spent time in Scotland and England, and within two years of returning to Australia joined the emergency department team at Westmead Hospital. Since then she has been working in Western Sydney.

One of Christine’s fondest memories is the end of her nursing training and the ceremony that surrounded it.

It was the most amazing thing; there was so much pomp about it – the veil, the certificate, tossing your training hat and stomping it to the floor, the ball thrown from the previous year; it was so special,” she recalls.

In early 2000, Christine received a Masters in Public Administration scholarship from the Prime Minister and Cabinet Office, giving her the opportunity to learn how to work in government and move away from silos. She cites this as a highlight that has provided her with the contacts, tools and knowledge to really help her drive innovation and change in health and other organizations.

Christine’s career highlights are not only her professional accomplishments of which she is most proud, but are also legacies of the WSLHD.

She implemented ER injury surveillance across the WSLHD, a first in Australia. The data collected has provided vital information to various government departments, helping to make key changes such as reducing speed limits on roads in New South Wales and adding extra safety precautions to methadone containers.

Christine also led one of the country’s first pilot projects for Australia’s Western Sydney Early Development Census, which is now a national initiative used to provide insight into child development to inform communities and support planning, policy and action.

Other projects of note include the implementation of Labor Development Orders with legal aid, which to date helps support disadvantaged people, and the promotion of the implementation of anti-tobacco policies throughout the district.

Throughout her many roles, Christine ensured that the community was at the center of everything she did, because “at the heart of it all, it’s people that matter.” This has been especially true throughout the COVID-19 pandemic.

Christine is the engine room of the Center and it has never been more visible than in the past two years,” said Shopna Bag, Acting Director of Population Health WSLHD.

“It is through his dedication, tireless support and fearless leadership that we have been able to weather the storms to get to where we are today.

“With staff coming from all over the district to join the Center for Population Health, feedback was unanimous that they valued the team culture, our teamwork and felt it was one of the best teams in which they had worked.

“It is at the heart of his legacy and his contributions to the Centre’s success and achievements are immeasurable.”

Christine at the opening of the Blacktown Vaccination Center in 2021.

Christine said she will miss WSLHD for her willingness to take measured risks and work in a supportive and exciting environment. He will also miss his partnerships with various government agencies and his “incredible” health promotion team.

The feeling is mutual, Michelle Nolan, acting head of health promotion, said:
“Christine taught us what makes a great leader and gave us so much to aspire to.

“His real, approachable, honest and compassionate approach to our work and our team is appreciated by all of us.”

Happy retirement Christine!

]]>
Population Health and HIV PrEP https://surroundhealth.net/population-health-and-hiv-prep/ Tue, 15 Feb 2022 13:09:12 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/population-health-and-hiv-prep/ Douglas Krakower, MD: As for trying to achieve the quadruple objective of [Institute for Healthcare Improvement], there are many ways to improve both patient experience and outcomes, as well as clinician experiences, satisfaction and outcomes. I think we have to recognize that PrEP [pre-exposure prophylaxis] at the moment is relatively complicated from the point of […]]]>

Douglas Krakower, MD: As for trying to achieve the quadruple objective of [Institute for Healthcare Improvement], there are many ways to improve both patient experience and outcomes, as well as clinician experiences, satisfaction and outcomes. I think we have to recognize that PrEP [pre-exposure prophylaxis] at the moment is relatively complicated from the point of view of the medical aspects. There’s a lot of follow-up. For example, right now, for people taking oral PrEP based on CDC guidelines, which were just updated last week, the idea is to have someone come in quarterly for their adherence. , their medications and their tests. It’s really important from a safety perspective, but it’s a burden on patients and providers. I think we need to think about ways to safely demedicalize PrEP to some degree so that it is more accessible. We meet patients where they are, because people have full lives and they can be otherwise perfectly healthy, and so we don’t want to overburden them to the point that they don’t choose to continue the PrEP or initiate it in the first place.

Same thing on the clinician side. I think we need to find ways to give clinicians tools to make HIV testing, PrEP conversations, prescribing, and follow-up much easier for them and their staff. This could relieve busy clinicians of other healthcare professionals who can do much of the work with clients and patients to ease some of the burden on the clinician prescribing it. We can think of ways to use the electronic health record and automated tools to help remind clinicians of patients who may be at increased risk for HIV based on their electronic health record history. For example, if they have ever had sexually transmitted infections, this would be a way to get them thinking about talking about PrEP.

In terms of monitoring, if you have large numbers of people on PrEP in a panel of clinicians, we really need population health management tools, whether it’s staff, where they can offload with a nurse, physician assistant, or other professional who can work on following up with people after the initial prescription and making sure they have what they need in terms of laboratory care, adherence counseling, and to get their questions answered. This can really positively impact the Quadruple Aim of everyone’s experience and results.

I think we need to think about innovative ways to bring PrEP to people where they are, including dispensing it completely from the healthcare system. It’s already underway with the idea of ​​telemedicine for PrEP, or tele-PrEP, where you can have people from any jurisdiction in the country accessing PrEP centrally with virtual visits, testing home laboratory or maybe local tests, but it avoids having to take a day off for example, and come to the clinic 4 times a year. There are many ways to innovate and improve the Quadruple Aim Lenses [Institute for Healthcare Improvement].

There are a number of population health challenges in terms of who might be eligible for or taking PrEP. The first is to raise awareness about PrEP, especially in communities where rates of new HIV infections have been high, such as the southeastern United States, and where PrEP use has been lower than in other regions, and particularly among black and Latino populations. I think some of these challenges can be addressed with well-designed public health campaigns where people are made aware of PrEP in the wider community. I think there have been misconceptions that PrEP is only for certain populations. We’ve heard from research we’ve done that cisgender women have heard that PrEP is only for gay men, for example, and we know that’s not true at all. In fact, PrEP is underused among cisgender women. We need to think of ways to inform the public that this is a benefit to them so that they can access it.

I think we also need to facilitate access instead of asking people to go exclusively to health care facilities where some people are otherwise healthy and don’t see a health care provider regularly. Others may have faced stigma and discrimination or judgments from health care providers regarding sexual health care. People may not want to see clinicians for things like PrEP. So if we can think of creative ways to use community organizations to implement PrEP in the future, I think those would be ways to improve access more broadly at the population level.

Once people are using PrEP and they’re engaged, I think having access to paraprofessionals who aren’t necessarily the clinician prescribing PrEP can also improve the number of people we can support on PrEP. For example, at the hospital where I work, there is a pharmacist who has been very motivated to work with the population using PrEP in the primary care clinic. It’s a large, busy primary care clinic, and there are a number of primary care providers who prescribe PrEP to their patients. But having the pharmacist as the central person who has expertise, maybe a little more time to manage the group, and also using the electronic health record to track people, those are ways you can really scale at the population level without overburdening clients or healthcare professionals managing PrEP.

Thinking about ways to use telemedicine for PrEP is a really creative way to do it also for people who are in rural areas, or frankly, people who just prefer to do things virtually. The COVID-19 pandemic has given people the opportunity to try new ways to access and use health care. While I don’t think the entire world will be virtual in terms of healthcare, in the indefinite future there is no doubt that some people and some aspects of healthcare can be delivered more effectively and efficiently using fully telemedicine or perhaps a combined-hybrid model. PrEP, I think, is a really good way to do that.

There are already academic, public health, and private organizations that have strong tele-PrEP programs that have been running for several years now. These have not yet been studied as rigorously as I would like to know the results, but I feel from speaking to people who have engaged in them that these are excellent opportunities for scaling up PrEP at the population level to more people. Colleagues of mine here in Boston are conducting studies with colleagues in the South to see if a tele-PrEP model keeps people engaged and adherent to PrEP compared to a standard in-person model. Over the next few years, we will also learn much more about some of these innovative approaches to delivering PrEP.

In terms of programs that can help make PrEP more effective for patients and for healthcare system providers, I think having a team-based approach is a great way to approach PrEP. There’s the prescribing clinician, but there are nurses, pharmacists, physician assistants, a whole host of people on the team who may have different levels of expertise and different amounts of time.

For example, in terms of adherence counseling, research has shown that using cognitive behavioral methodologies can be really effective in helping people address adherence issues, but a primary care clinician with a broad patient panel may not have time to do this. This involves hiring nurses who may be trained in some of these methods, or behavioral health specialists, and even peer navigators who can speak at a peer level with someone using PrEP about their experiences and how they overcame challenges to access PrEP. , incorporating into their lives some of the social considerations of PrEP use in terms of disclosure to partners, peers and family. I see the future and the present, frankly, uses a team approach.

At one of the places where I work, we have an excellent nurse who basically manages the PrEP program, except for the prescription and refills, and does an excellent job. This person has acquired all the expertise as a specialist as an infectious disease nurse, and so switching to PrEP is really quite simple. She is able to handle many more patient cases than I alone. Using team-based approaches and integrating these with technology tools, such as using population health management tools from the electronic health record, are ways to escalate that more effectively. I think it has been useful to me personally in our establishment. I know I’m not always at the clinic. I do research as well as clinical care, and even the busiest clinicians have been pulled in so many directions with everything they are asked to do, so we have to unburden ourselves and work as a team to make sure that is scalable and sustainable.

Ryan Bitton, PharmD, MBA: Strategies for managing PrEP use have evolved over the years. Initially, some plans had pre-clearance, others did not. They’re at the point where there’s not a lot of pre-clearance; PrEP is a pretty standard of care recommendation. There really is no utilization management for some of the therapies. Things like generic Truvada are available without prior authorization with a $0 copayment I assume for most plans including ours. There are obviously several therapies. Some of the other therapies may have prior authorization and requirements around a generic-Truvada-first type of policy. If Generic Truvada doesn’t work, which I don’t know if we see failure in this population, Truvada failure may not be the problem, but the contraindication or intolerance or reasons for which you would not like to use generic Truvada, there are allowances to enter other therapies.

Transcript edited for clarity.

]]>
Population Health Management Systems Market Growth (Status and Outlook) 2022-2030 – Talking Democrat https://surroundhealth.net/population-health-management-systems-market-growth-status-and-outlook-2022-2030-talking-democrat/ Fri, 11 Feb 2022 23:07:48 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/population-health-management-systems-market-growth-status-and-outlook-2022-2030-talking-democrat/ Population Health Management Systems Market Outlook: Global Population Health Management Systems Market the report includes the objectives and scopes of the market during the forecast period by highlighting the key segments, trends and major players to provide comprehensive data on the market status, trends, segmentation and development forecast of the global population health management systems […]]]>

Population Health Management Systems Market Outlook:

Global Population Health Management Systems Market the report includes the objectives and scopes of the market during the forecast period by highlighting the key segments, trends and major players to provide comprehensive data on the market status, trends, segmentation and development forecast of the global population health management systems market. The research report includes an in-depth study of the overall industry status, industrial policies and restraints, changing market dynamics and their impact across the globe.

Get a FREE sample PDF of the report @ https://marketstrides.com/request-sample/population-health-management-systems-market

Some of the major players in the global population health management systems market are
_x000D_
Allscripts Healthcare Solutions Inc._x000D_
Cerner Corporation._x000D_
McKesson Corporation._x000D_
International Business Machines Corporation (IBM)._x000D_
Epic Systems Corporation._x000D_
Health Catalyst._x000D_
Optum, Inc._x000D_
Conifer Health Solutions._x000D_
Philips._x000D_
Health Catalyst LLC._x000D_
_x000D_

Population Health Management Systems Market Research Report provides an in-depth analysis of the competitive emerging markets in the global market.
The research report includes specific segments by region (country), by manufacturers, by type, by application, by market share and by revenue. Each type provides information about the production during the forecast period from 2022 to 2030. The application segment also provides the consumption during the forecast period from 2022 to 2030. The segments help in identifying the different factors, key trends driving market growth. The Population Health Management Systems Market report also provides company share analysis by countries, regions and types.

Research Methodology

Our research methodology is a mix of secondary and primary research that ideally begins with exhaustive data mining, conducting primary interviews (suppliers/distributors/end users) and formulating ideas, estimates and grow accordingly. Final primary validation is a mandate to confirm our research findings with key opinion leaders (KoLs), industry experts, population health management systems include major supplies and independent consultants, among others.

Market segmentation

The population health management systems market is segmented on the basis of type, application, end-use industry, region and country.

Global Population Health Management Systems Market by Type

_x000D_
On site_x000D_
Cloud-based_x000D_
Web-based_x000D_

The population health management systems market sub-segment is expected to hold the largest market share during the forecast period. Growing market and industry concern is expected to drive the population health management systems market.

Global Population Health Management Systems Market by Application

_x000D_
Payer_x000D_
Supplier_x000D_
_x000D_

Population health management systems application valves are one of the most fundamental and indispensable components of today’s modern technological society. The market segment is expected to hold the largest market share in the global population health management systems market.

By region:

• North America (US, Canada)
• Europe (UK, Germany, France, Italy)
• Asia Pacific (China, India, Japan, Singapore, Malaysia)
• Latin America (Brazil, Mexico)
• Middle East and Africa

Impact of Covid on the Population Health Management Systems Market

The COVID-19 pandemic has presented new challenges to businesses in the global marketplace. The major consumers of population health management system industry are ICT media and different industries. The global production of ICT media stood at one million units in 2019. In 2020, the exponentially growing market faced an unforeseen hurdle – the Covid19 pandemic. Even though the market managed to avoid incurring losses, it experienced slow growth during the terrible year.

Here are the main features of the report:

Full overview of market structure: Overview, industry life cycle analysis, supply chain analysis.
Analysis of the market environment: Growth drivers and constraints.
Recent market segment forecasts.
Competitive landscape and dynamics: Market share, product portfolio, etc.

Buy this Population Health Management Systems Market Report 2022-2030: Choose License Type

Check the discount for this report: https://marketstrides.com/check-discount/population-health-management-systems-market

Customization of the report: Contact us

Market Strides is a global aggregator and publisher of market trend reports, stock reports, database directories and economic reports. Our repository is diverse, covering virtually every industry sector and even more so all categories and sub-categories within the industry.

Our pre-integration strategy for publishers is perhaps what sets us apart in the market. Publishers and their market growth reports are meticulously validated by our panel of internal consultants, before being posted on our website. These in-house consultants are also responsible for ensuring that our website features only the most up-to-date reports.

You have a question ? Ask our experts

Market Strides has a team of professionals who assist you in many advanced industry-specific trends, content and test different strategies and implement the most productive one for the business.

For more information, E-mail – [email protected]

Contact us: +1 856 677 8909 (USA)

Follow us on social networks:

|| LinkedIn || Twitter || pinterest || tumblr || instagram || Average

]]>
NBC 26 Today interviews an expert on adolescent health https://surroundhealth.net/nbc-26-today-interviews-an-expert-on-adolescent-health/ Wed, 09 Feb 2022 13:55:00 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/nbc-26-today-interviews-an-expert-on-adolescent-health/ GREEN BAY, Wis. (NBC 26) – NBC 26 spoke today with Dr. Megan Moreno, adolescent health expert at UW Health Kids in Madison. Many parents may be wondering at this time of year how to keep their children healthy while coping with the cold winter months, as well as the COVID-19 pandemic. Winter weather and […]]]>

GREEN BAY, Wis. (NBC 26) – NBC 26 spoke today with Dr. Megan Moreno, adolescent health expert at UW Health Kids in Madison.

Many parents may be wondering at this time of year how to keep their children healthy while coping with the cold winter months, as well as the COVID-19 pandemic.

Winter weather and ongoing COVID may limit activities for children and teens. This may mean that children and teenagers connect more through screens. Parents can ensure children and teens use technology to support their health.

Make sure your child is getting what they need to be physically healthy. These things include:

  • Sleep: Depending on your child’s age, he needs 8 to 12 hours of sleep each night. Help your child establish a soothing bedtime routine so they can fall asleep quickly and get all the sleep they need. Some ways to use devices to start the transition to bedtime might include playing soft music or listening to a storytelling podcast with your child. An excellent one is the “Stories” podcast. Current recommendations are to avoid looking at screens (browsing or scrolling) one hour before bedtime.
  • Physical activity: It can be more difficult to do physical activity in the winter when the temperature is low. Consider creative indoor activities such as dancing to music, or incorporating gaming systems such as “dance dance revolution”, or watching YouTube videos such as lean dancing or yoga.
]]>
Fererro launches online store alongside Deliverti https://surroundhealth.net/fererro-launches-online-store-alongside-deliverti/ Tue, 08 Feb 2022 09:10:54 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/fererro-launches-online-store-alongside-deliverti/ Italian confectionery company Ferrero has launched an online store in collaboration with Rome-based e-commerce platform Deliverti, owned by the Ad Maiora Group. The two partners launched the Ferrero Shop project in 2021 – a year in which online shopping saw an 18% annual growth in Italy, due to the continuing COVID-19 pandemic. Translating Ferrero values […]]]>

Italian confectionery company Ferrero has launched an online store in collaboration with Rome-based e-commerce platform Deliverti, owned by the Ad Maiora Group.

The two partners launched the Ferrero Shop project in 2021 – a year in which online shopping saw an 18% annual growth in Italy, due to the continuing COVID-19 pandemic.

Translating Ferrero values

Building on successes with brands such as Parmalat and Coca-Cola, Deliverti was tasked with translating Ferrero’s values ​​and delivering a comprehensive online user experience focused on functionality and product personalization.

During the Christmas period, Deliverti has developed a number of festive campaigns based on the personalization of products such as personalized packs of Nutella and Kinder.

The personalized marketing project has allowed Ferrero to strengthen its loyalty offer, developing exclusive offers that are not available through traditional sales channels.

User-friendly interface

The Ferrero Store offers a user-friendly interface and an easy-to-use browsing experience.

An integrated customer service portal offers various contact channels, including live chat as well as email and phone support.

The e-commerce partnership incorporates a variety of internal functions, from developing digital and non-digital tools for customizing orders and products, such as packaging, to managing warehouse activity, invoicing and collection.

Ferrero International SA, the parent company of the Ferrero Group, achieved consolidated revenue of €12.7 billion for its financial year 2021, up 3.4% from €12.3 billion l ‘last year.

© 2022 European supermarket magazine. Article by Branislav Pekic. For more A-Brands news, click here. Click on subscribe register for ESM: European Supermarket Magazine.

]]>
One Health approach to prevent the emergence of zoonotic pathogens https://surroundhealth.net/one-health-approach-to-prevent-the-emergence-of-zoonotic-pathogens/ Thu, 03 Feb 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/one-health-approach-to-prevent-the-emergence-of-zoonotic-pathogens/ Azlan Othman In light of the continuing public health threats posed by emerging diseases and new variants of COVID-19, the ASEAN Center for Biodiversity (ACB) and the Food and Agriculture (FAO) seek to build capacity to integrate biodiversity into health frameworks and systems. ACB and FAO have signed an agreement to strengthen collaboration between the […]]]>

Azlan Othman

In light of the continuing public health threats posed by emerging diseases and new variants of COVID-19, the ASEAN Center for Biodiversity (ACB) and the Food and Agriculture (FAO) seek to build capacity to integrate biodiversity into health frameworks and systems.

ACB and FAO have signed an agreement to strengthen collaboration between the Ministries of Natural Resources Management, Forestry and Wildlife of ASEAN, within the framework of the One Health approach, with the overall aim of prevent the spread and emergence of infectious zoonotic pathogens at source.

One Health is a collaborative approach across sectors and disciplines with the aim of achieving optimal health outcomes by considering the interconnectedness between people, animals, plants and their common environment.

“The crisis caused by the COVID-19 pandemic has shed light on how our public health and well-being depend on healthy ecosystems and rich biodiversity. This partnership comes at a good time as we prepare to recover from the pandemic and build our long-term resilience in the face of similar crises,” said ACB Executive Director Theresa Mundita Lim.

Lim said that given the rich biological diversity of ASEAN, it is important for the region to be aware of the relevance of this natural wealth to reduce the risk of future pandemics, given that there could still be around 1 .7 million viruses thought to be found in various species of mammals and birds, and up to half of these could become infectious to humans.

“We are entering an era of pandemics, as scientists have warned before, and meeting ever-changing challenges requires an integrated and holistic approach, which pays due attention to our common environment,” Lim said.

The number of Omicron cases has increased exponentially across the world, leading to further impacts on lives and economies.

In response to the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, ASEAN Member States (AMS) – comprising Brunei Darussalam, Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam – adopted at the 37th ASEAN Summit in 2020 the ASEAN Comprehensive Recovery Framework (ACRF).

The ACRF provides a blueprint to guide collaborative action among partners, including ecosystem-based approaches to increase resilience to future pandemics and continued promotion of biodiversity mainstreaming across relevant sectors.

Under the agreement between ACB and FAO, a regional implementation plan will be developed that will complement existing cooperation between ASEAN and other relevant agencies.

CDA will also work with FAO on the two virtual learning center training modules being developed and aimed at promoting the importance of biodiversity, ecosystems and the environment in the veterinary and health sectors. public.

The ACB is an intergovernmental organization facilitating cooperation and coordination between the 10 AMS on the conservation and sustainable use of biological diversity and the fair and equitable sharing of the benefits arising from the use of these natural treasures.

]]>
2022 brings new hope for heart health https://surroundhealth.net/2022-brings-new-hope-for-heart-health/ Wed, 02 Feb 2022 12:08:04 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/2022-brings-new-hope-for-heart-health/ American Heart Month provides a valuable opportunity for people to take stock of their cardiovascular health, says Jonathan A. Fialkow, MD, population health manager for Baptist Health. It’s also an opportunity for the medical community to drive home the basics of heart health, which it says include knowing your “dashboard” numbers, knowing your personal risk […]]]>

American Heart Month provides a valuable opportunity for people to take stock of their cardiovascular health, says Jonathan A. Fialkow, MD, population health manager for Baptist Health. It’s also an opportunity for the medical community to drive home the basics of heart health, which it says include knowing your “dashboard” numbers, knowing your personal risk factors, and taking active steps every day to maintain your cardiovascular health.

Cardiologist Jonathan A. Fialkow, MD, is associate director of the Miami Cardiac & Vascular Institute and director of population health for Baptist Health

Dr. Fialkow, a cardiologist who is also associate director of the Miami Cardiac & Vascular Institute, says there are many reasons to be encouraged about cardiovascular health today. “I think more people are now aware of their blood pressure, cholesterol and blood sugar levels, and how their numbers are in line with federal health guidelines.”

Additionally, Dr. Fialkow notes, more primary care physicians are now using coronary calcium scoring for early assessment of cardiac risk, which he says can be an excellent indicator of future cardiovascular health.

“Your calcium score is determined by a quick, simple and inexpensive chest CT scan that allows us to assess the amount of calcium in the walls of your arteries,” he explains. “With this, we can predict the cardiovascular issues you’re at risk for five or maybe 10 years and start taking steps to minimize those risks.”

Minimizing risk starts with making good — or, at least, better — decisions every day, says Dr. Fialkow, adding that diet is an easy and obvious place to start on your journey to better heart health.

“More people are now adopting low-carb diets and incorporating more plant-based foods, which is great,” says Dr. Fialkow. “I think we’re also starting to understand that it’s not so much about limiting fat in our diets as it is about avoiding all processed and refined foods. These contribute to obesity, type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure, all of which can increase your risk of heart disease.

If you’re at risk for heart disease, new technology promises to help detect a heart attack before it even happens, according to Dr. Fialkow. “Soon we may be able to implant a tiny device in the patient’s chest that will allow us to remotely monitor their vital signs 24 hours a day, whether they are at home, at work or on vacation,” he explains. -he. “If certain conditions develop, the device alerts the patient to seek help immediately and then allows us to see exactly what was going on with their heart at that time.”

expired drugs

Another reason for encouragement, says Dr. Fialkow, is that certain drugs developed to fight diabetes have been shown to significantly reduce heart disease. “We’re looking at these drugs not just in diabetic patients, but in other high-risk people, and we’re seeing very promising results.”

Additionally, Dr. Fialkow says drugs such as semaglutide help people with type 2 diabetes, who are at high risk for heart disease, lower both their weight and their blood sugar levels. “We are also looking at the effectiveness of these drugs in helping protect against heart disease in people without diabetes.”

And what about the link between cardiovascular health and stress? “I think the more we talk about it, the better,” says Dr. Fialkow. “The pandemic has brought incalculable stress and uncertainty – and, for many, incredible sadness – into our lives over the past two years. Even though the long-term effects of COVID-19 on our cardiovascular health have yet to be documented, we do know that stress itself contributes to heart disease and other conditions, and there have been many.

Dr Fialkow says taking care of yourself and your heart starts with finding a diet and exercise routine that works for you, and doing something – anything, everyday – that brings you closer to your goal. In particular, Dr. Fialkow offers these tips for staying heart healthy in 2022:

• Get checked by your doctor.

• Consider medical treatment to reduce risk, if necessary (i.e. medicines to control blood pressure, cholesterol and blood sugar).

• Start exercising and keep going – aim for 30 minutes a day, every day.

• Focus on managing stress and taking care of your mental health.

• Minimize the amount of processed or refined foods you eat and limit alcohol.

• Get a good night’s sleep: there is a clear link between sleep disorders and heart disease

• Pay attention to your body and let your doctor know if something is wrong.

Additionally, advises Dr. Fialkow, learn to recognize cardiovascular disease symptoms, which may include:

• Excessive shortness of breath with less activity

• Tightness in the chest, jaw or arm

• Shiny ankle skin and/or ankle swelling

• Shortness of breath when lying in bed

• Indigestion with activity

• General tiredness

“More than 800,000 Americans have died from COVID-19 during the pandemic, and that’s just an awful number when you think about it,” says Dr. Fialkow. “But we lose 800,000 Americans every year to cardiovascular disease, so there’s clearly more work to be done on education and screening — not just now during American Heart Month, but throughout the world. ‘year.”

Tags: American Heart Month, cardiovascular disease, cardiovascular health, heart disease, heart health, Jonathan Fialkow MD, Miami Cardiac & Vascular Institute

]]>
WCM-Q webinar series improves understanding of key population health challenges https://surroundhealth.net/wcm-q-webinar-series-improves-understanding-of-key-population-health-challenges/ Sun, 30 Jan 2022 04:31:01 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/wcm-q-webinar-series-improves-understanding-of-key-population-health-challenges/ Doha: The Population Health & Wellbeing series was launched to explore how evidence-based integrative and preventive approaches can promote health and address various public health issues, ranging from infectious diseases like COVID-19 and hepatitis C , lifestyle-related non-communicable diseases such as type 2 diabetes, obesity and metabolic syndrome. Since the launch of the series, a […]]]>

Doha: The Population Health & Wellbeing series was launched to explore how evidence-based integrative and preventive approaches can promote health and address various public health issues, ranging from infectious diseases like COVID-19 and hepatitis C , lifestyle-related non-communicable diseases such as type 2 diabetes, obesity and metabolic syndrome.

Since the launch of the series, a total of 12 webinars have been hosted by PSI, each presented by a different expert speaker. Recent topics have included social determinants of non-communicable diseases in the Eastern Mediterranean region, presented by Dr. Hanan Abdul Rahim of Qatar University; the role of medical lifestyle in population health by Dr. James Rippe of the University of Massachusetts Medical School; WCM-Q’s experience in optimizing public health research during the COVID-19 pandemic by Dr. Sohaila Cheema of WCM-Q; and the use of big data in population health research related to hepatitis C and COVID-19 by Dr. Adeel Butt of Hamad Medical Corporation and WCM-Q. One of the highlights of the series was a presentation titled “Combating the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Perspective from Qatar” by Dr. Mohamed Bin Hamad Bin Jassim Al-Thani, Director of the Department of Public Health at the Ministry of Qatar Public Health. and Associate Professor of Population Health Sciences at WCM-Q and Qatar University.

Dr. Ravinder Mamtani, Professor of Population Health Sciences/Professor of Medicine (Center for Global Health) and Associate Dean for Population Health and Lifestyle Medicine

at WCM-Q said, “We are extremely grateful to the highly esteemed Dr Mohamed Bin Hamad Bin Jassim Al-Thani of the Ministry of Public Health for providing us with his expertise and knowledge on the excellent work that has been done in Qatar to contain the COVID-19 pandemic, which undoubtedly saved many lives. Thanks to the high caliber of our expert speakers and the excellence of their presentations, I am happy to say that our series on population health and well-being has been a huge success and continues to go from strength to strength.

Other topics covered in the series include a New York perspective on professional medical conduct, presented by Paula M. Breen of the New York State Department of Health; lessons learned from four decades of experience in medical education, by Dr. William W. Pinsky of the Commission on Education for International Medical Graduates; strategies for integrating real-world data with clinical trial data to improve decision-making, presented by Dr. Ronac Mamtani and Dr. Rebecca Hubbard, both of the University of Pennsylvania; and “The Living Gap: Bridged by Compassion” presented by Dr. David Reilly, Director of TheWEL and The Healing Shift Inquiry programs.

-Ends-

About Weill Cornell Medicine – Qatar

Weill Cornell Medicine – Qatar is a partnership between Cornell University and the Qatar Foundation. It offers a comprehensive six-year medical program leading to the Cornell University medical degree with instruction from Professors Cornell and Weill Cornell and physicians from Hamad Medical Corporation (HMC), Aspetar Orthopedic and Sports Hospital Medicine, Primary Health Care Corporation, Feto Maternal Center and Sidra Medicine, who hold positions at Weill Cornell. Through its biomedical research program, WCM-Q is building a sustainable research community in Qatar while advancing basic science and clinical research. Through its Faculty of Medicine, WCM-Q seeks to provide the best possible education for medical students, to improve current and future health care, and to provide high quality health care to the people of Qatar.

For more information, please contact:
Hanan Lakkis
Associate Director, Media and Publications
Weill Cornell Medicine – Qatar
hyl2004@qatar-med.cornell.edu

© Press Release 2022

]]>
How ‘payday loans’ help wolves manage their money https://surroundhealth.net/how-payday-loans-help-wolves-manage-their-money/ Fri, 28 Jan 2022 09:41:22 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/how-payday-loans-help-wolves-manage-their-money/ Wolves received £23m in loan secured against future installments from Diogo Jota’s sale to Liverpool, helping Jeff Shi manage cash flow WOLVERHAMPTON, ENGLAND – JULY 15: Wolverhampton Wanderers Technical Director Scott Sellars (L) and Wolverhampton Wanderers Executive Chairman Jeff Shi look on during a Wolverhampton Wanderers pre-season training session at Sir Jack Hayward Training Ground […]]]>

Clubs won’t use the same wording, but many regularly take loans from banks. It is very common in modern football.

Wolves are no different. In 2019, they took out a £50m loan backed by future TV revenue with Australian financial services giant Macquarie Group.

Last month, they then received £23million from the same group on a secured loan against the last two installments owed by Liverpool for the sale of Diogo Jota.

Financial jargon aside – Wolves essentially received £23m in December and when those future installments arrive from Anfield, due in July 2022 and July 2023, that money will then be refunded to the bank – with interest.

The reason? Cash flow. Clubs tend to receive huge sums of money at the start of a season, with advances from television contracts and subscription sales, but often have little revenue throughout a season.

They have to pay salaries and various other expenses, and that’s where bank loans come in.

“Good cash flow in any business is essential for survival and sustainability,” said football finance expert Kieran Maguire.

“Companies don’t fail because of a lack of profit, they fail because they don’t manage their cash flow well.

“It’s exactly the same as us. As individuals, we may be asset rich, in the sense that we have a car or a house, but if we don’t have the money to buy groceries for that week, we will starve.

“Having someone in a football club who can do cash flow forecasting and budgeting is essential for the survival of the club.”

If you or I have taken out a payday loan, the interest may be piling up and financial difficulties are on the horizon.

But with traditional banks reluctant to lend to football clubs, these specialist lenders step in with lower interest rates.

“I don’t think there is a danger of clubs taking out these types of loans,” Maguire added.

“If you get the money now, that will solve the problem and it could give you a cash flow problem in a year or two, or perhaps Wolves would have sold two more players or secured funding from other sources.

“So I don’t see that as a problem. It’s a cash management issue and it’s cheaper than other forms of borrowing because it’s secured by money transfers. The clubs could see an advantage in this.

“There is always interest on this type of loan.

“In the documents we have seen, the lender normally charges between seven and nine and a half percent interest per annum.

“It’s not prohibitive and it’s cheaper than a credit card. It’s cheaper than some owners charge for club loans, but it’s still important if we look at the money versus Diogo Jota’s transfer.

“We’re talking tens of millions of pounds, so the interest is potentially hundreds of thousands of pounds, but that won’t stop a club from continuing.”

The financial world of football was murky enough before the Covid-19 pandemic kicked in.

There are many examples, past and present, where this goes wrong and clubs cease to exist.

But for now, football payday loans will remain and the industry as a whole should thrive.

Maguire said: “The pandemic has certainly not helped clubs.

“The Premier League is financially insulating itself from the pandemic due to the strength of TV deals, but matchday revenue is still a vital part of a club’s finances. Therefore, this hole must be filled in one way or another.

“They like to call it bill discounting, but I prefer the term ‘glorified payday loan.’

“These types of loans are quite common in other industries, and those industries survive.”

]]>
Mental Health Promotion Week | Queen’s University Gazette https://surroundhealth.net/mental-health-promotion-week-queens-university-gazette/ Fri, 21 Jan 2022 19:23:50 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/mental-health-promotion-week-queens-university-gazette/ Mental Health Promotion Week features virtual events and initiatives to support mental health at Queen’s. During Mental Health Awareness Week, the supports and resources available to students, staff and faculty at Queen’s University are highlighted while raising awareness about mental health and stigma. Queen’s University’s annual Mental Health Week is an opportunity to reflect on […]]]>

Mental Health Promotion Week features virtual events and initiatives to support mental health at Queen’s.

During Mental Health Awareness Week, the supports and resources available to students, staff and faculty at Queen’s University are highlighted while raising awareness about mental health and stigma.

Queen’s University’s annual Mental Health Week is an opportunity to reflect on personal mental health and work towards building a community of care. Designed to surround Bell Let’s Talk Day (January 26), Mental Health Awareness Week aims to address the stigma associated with mental illness while raising awareness of the supports and resources available to students, staff and the teachers. The week-long event runs from January 24-28 with various initiatives aimed at increasing social connections and improving emotional, physical and mental health.

Our goal is to highlight some of the incredible mental health promotion efforts at Queen’s, especially the work done by student leaders and student staff,” says Kate Humphrys, Health Promotion Coordinator, Student Wellness Services (SWS).We hope this week will help keep the conversation going on this crucial topic throughout the year.

Post-secondary education can be a stressful time for students, especially with changes to learning formats and public health guidelines. As the university enters its third year of the COVID-19 pandemic, mental health education and advocacy continues to be an important priority at Queen’s. Encouraging open, respectful and inclusive conversations, Mental Health Promotion Week is about feeling connected even in times of social distancing and remote learning.

“We know that mental health is essential to our overall well-being and sometimes we can focus on the self-care activities that help maintain good mental health, but other times it may not be enough,” says Beth Blackett, Special Health Promotion Projects, Student Welfare Services When someone is struggling, they often need a community of care that can help them find the supports and resources they need. Mental Health Awareness Week helps highlight some of these supports and reminds everyone that it’s okay to talk about mental health, to reach out when we need help and , above all, to support each other.

Working to create an environment where everyone feels safe and accepted is paramount to ensuring everyone can achieve their full potential as healthy, resilient and inspired members of the Queen’s community. Recognizing the intersectionality between mental health and other areas of wellness, Student Wellness Services, along with various student-run groups and departments on campus, have created a number of virtual challenges, of events and workshops designed to stimulate discussion and social engagement.

Events and Initiatives

  • This year, in collaboration with the Queen’s Student Mental Health Network, the Campus Wellness Project will announce candidates for Classroom Champions for Mental Health. Class Champions recognize teachers, instructors and teaching assistants who create learning environments where student mental health is valued and supported.
  • Take part in the Get Active challenge by signing up for a virtual fitness class at ARC, hosted by Athletics and Recreation.
  • Participate in the Rest & Relax Challenge by booking a peer wellness coaching session or healthy lifestyle professional appointment to learn strategies to improve sleep habits. Attend a workshop on how to create a personalized self-care plan by sharing evidence-based strategies for managing stress, or learn how to support someone in difficulty by signing up for an identify and respond seminar students in distress or in crisis. Find your safe space through trauma-informed writing exercises and guided mediation.
  • Grab your paper and writing utensils and create beautiful affirmation art with Queen’s Sexual Violence Prevention and Response Services. Connect with members of the LGBQT community by participating in Queer Survival Discussions, hosted in conjunction with Sexual Assault Center Kingston. Finding Your Joy Through Music encourages BIPOC students to come together and share their favorite songs from their playlist. Take a professionally led mindfulness session to visualize and promote positive personal growth.
  • Visit the virtual photo booth available on Bell Let’s Talk Day and take part in a digital scavenger hunt focusing on BIPOC resources. Visit any of the various in-person locations on campus to pick up Bell merchandise, including toques and bubble wrap. Go online and download the Bell Let’s Talk Toolkit and see how you can support mental health more.
  • Feed yourself by signing up and picking up a free fresh food box with all the key produce and ingredients needed to make a healthy meal, or check out the Food Access Resource website for more tips on where to find healthy, affordable food . Take part in Stories Spark Change with conversations with internationally acclaimed author Roxane Gay and bestselling author Eternity Martis about healing and sexual violence.
  • Embrace nature by exploring the outdoors in the Get Outside challenge.

Learn more about the virtual events offered on campus on the Mental Health Promotion Week webpage. Events will continue to be added throughout the week.

Additional Resources

Queen’s students can access support from the AMS Peer Support Center and the Student Wellness Services Mental Health Services website. Additional resources include Empower Me, a 24/7 phone service that connects students with qualified counselors, consultants, and life coaches for a variety of issues, and TAO (Therapy Assistance Online), an online, mobile-friendly library of wellness-promoting pathways.

]]>