adolescent health – Surround Health http://surroundhealth.net/ Fri, 04 Mar 2022 01:50:01 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://surroundhealth.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-68-120x120.png adolescent health – Surround Health http://surroundhealth.net/ 32 32 GFGF launches 5-year adolescent health project in Damang https://surroundhealth.net/gfgf-launches-5-year-adolescent-health-project-in-damang/ Fri, 25 Feb 2022 02:29:17 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/gfgf-launches-5-year-adolescent-health-project-in-damang/ The project, costing GH¢70,000 per year, is being implemented by the Ghana Education Service to achieve a 30% drop in teenage pregnancies in the Damang and Huni-Valley circuits in 2025. Already, 294 peer educators in 24 schools in 10 communities had been trained to lead campaigns on adolescent reproductive health, menstrual hygiene, nutrition and sexually […]]]>

The project, costing GH¢70,000 per year, is being implemented by the Ghana Education Service to achieve a 30% drop in teenage pregnancies in the Damang and Huni-Valley circuits in 2025.

Already, 294 peer educators in 24 schools in 10 communities had been trained to lead campaigns on adolescent reproductive health, menstrual hygiene, nutrition and sexually transmitted infections (STIs) for young people in Damang catchment areas Mining.

It would also reduce the rate of teenage pregnancy among Basic Education Certificate Examination (BECE) students recorded over the years.

At the ceremony, schools received kits, including sanitary pads and workbooks to deepen young people’s knowledge of reproductive health issues.

Addressing the participants, the Acting Managing Director of Gold Field Ghana Ltd, Mr. Charles Kofi Nti said that the GFGF and adolescent health campaigns aim to sensitize students to be very careful about sexual activities, reduce teen pregnancy and other health problems. in the municipality of Prestea-Huni Valley.

He said the campaign was part of Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) 3 and 4 which aimed to ensure healthy lives and promote well-being at all ages, as well as inclusive and equitable quality education.

It also aimed to promote lifelong learning opportunities for all in mining communities and to encourage teenagers not to be distracted by health issues or pregnancies and become school dropouts.

“The program is in line with our corporate social responsibility (CSR) to improve the education and health of members of our communities.

This is to reinforce the idea that our youth should be good students and disciplined Ghanaian citizens; that you will not let anything interfere with your future. We need peer educators to train their peers to reduce teenage pregnancy and even HIV and AIDS. Parents also have a role to play in monitoring their children at home,” added Mr. Nti.

Describing adolescence as a period of transition from childhood to adulthood, Prestea-Huni Valley City Director of Education, Mrs. MaryVida Kwofie said it was a dream come true, claiming that “in 2019, 45 of our students became pregnant, it increased to 69 in 2020 and in 2020 reduced to 55. In collaboration with the GFGF, we distributed books to peer educators to teach and train them even on STIs.

Launching the programme, Municipal Chief Executive of Prestea-Huni Valley, Dr Isaac Dasmani, urged young people to stay away from peer pressure, illicit drugs and school truancy, and stay focused on their studies to excel in their future career.

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The Lancet Child and adolescent health: Multi-s https://surroundhealth.net/the-lancet-child-and-adolescent-health-multi-s/ Wed, 23 Feb 2022 01:01:43 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/the-lancet-child-and-adolescent-health-multi-s/ Peer review / Observational study / People Researchers report surveillance data recording cases of multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) among people aged 12 to 20 who had received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine in the first nine month of the US COVID-19 vaccination program. During the nine-month period, more than 21 […]]]>

Peer review / Observational study / People

  • Researchers report surveillance data recording cases of multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) among people aged 12 to 20 who had received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine in the first nine month of the US COVID-19 vaccination program.
  • During the nine-month period, more than 21 million children and adolescents in this age group received at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine, and a total of 21 cases of MIS-C were identified, suggesting that MIS-C has occurred in one in one million vaccinees. , which is significantly lower than previous estimates of 200 cases per million among unvaccinated people infected with SARS-CoV-2.
  • Six identified cases of MIS-C had no evidence of SARS-CoV-2 infection, suggesting that the rate of cases without evidence of SARS-CoV-2 infection was 0.3 cases per million people vaccinated in this age group. The authors emphasize that they are unable to determine if the vaccine contributed to these rare cases, or if there were other reasons for the illness, such as other unrecognized underlying inflammatory conditions.

Reported cases of multisystem inflammatory syndrome (MIS-C) in children and adolescents who received at least one dose of COVID-19 vaccine were rare (estimated at one case per million vaccinated individuals in this age group). According to an observational study published in The Lancet Child and adolescent health newspaper.

Although there is no direct comparator available, this survey found that the rate of MIS-C cases among vaccinated children and adolescents ages 12 to 20 in the United States is significantly lower than previously published estimates. in unvaccinated people aged 12 to 20 who had been infected with SARS. -CoV-2 from April to June 2020. [1]

Dr. Anna R. Yousaf of the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) says: “As part of the overall effort to monitor COVID-19 vaccine safety in the United States, the CDC closely monitors cases of MIS-C in vaccinated children. . Our results suggest that cases of MIS-C after COVID-19 vaccination are rare and that the likelihood of developing MIS-C is much higher in unvaccinated children who contract COVID-19. Vaccination against COVID-19 is recommended for anyone age 5 and older in the United States for the prevention of COVID-19. » [2]

MIS-C, also known as pediatric inflammatory multisystem syndrome (PIM-TS), is a rare disease associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection that was first recognized in April 2020. thinks MIS-C is an immune overreaction that occurs about two to six weeks after SARS-CoV-2 infection in children and adolescents. Symptoms include fever, rash, eye redness, and gastrointestinal symptoms (eg, diarrhea, upset stomach, nausea) and may lead to multiple organ failure. In the United States, reporting of possible cases of MIS-C after vaccination is required as part of emergency use authorizations for the COVID-19 vaccine.

This study investigated cases of MIS-C in children and adolescents aged 12-20 years reported during the first nine months of COVID-19 vaccination rollout in the United States (December 14, 2020 to August 31, 2021). [3] A team of medical specialists and epidemiologists reviewed 47 reports of potential MIS-C illness occurring in a person between the ages of 12 and 20 at any time after a dose of the COVID-19 vaccine. Of these 47 reports, 21 met the CDC MIS-C criteria. These were separated into those with and without evidence of past or recent SARS-CoV-2 infection from laboratory testing. They calculated case notification rates using CDC national vaccine surveillance data on the number of individuals ages 12 to 20 in the United States who received one or more doses of the COVID-19 vaccine. .

Of the 21 MIS-C cases, 15 had evidence of past or recent SARS-CoV-2 infection, while six did not. More than 21 million children and adolescents aged 12 to 20 had received one or more doses of a COVID-19 vaccine, representing one reported case per million people vaccinated in this age group. The MIS-C notification rate for people without evidence of SARS-CoV-2 infection was 0.3 cases per million people vaccinated.

The authors emphasize that they are unable to determine whether vaccination contributed to MIS-C disease in these rare cases. As MIS-C was first identified during the pandemic, there is no baseline rate of inflammatory disease in children and adolescents of unidentified cause to estimate a baseline number of cases expected over a period of nine months, regardless of COVID-19 infection or vaccination. It is possible that some of the identified cases had other unrecognized inflammatory conditions that coincidentally occurred after vaccination.

Of the 15 people previously infected with SARS-CoV-2, three were diagnosed with MIS-C outside of the typical two to six week (14─42 day) period in which MIS-C illness Later C is most likely to occur. These three people had the start of MIS-C 105 days, 191 days and 238 days after their positive SARS-CoV-2 test.

All 21 people were hospitalized, 12 were admitted to an intensive care unit and all were sent home. The median age was 16; 13 were male and eight were female.

All people with MIS-C in the study received the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine (BNT162b2), which was the only COVID-19 vaccine licensed in the United States for use in those under 18 years of age during the study period. 11 people received one dose and 10 received two doses of the vaccine before MIS-C disease onset. The median time from dose to hospitalization was eight days for those who received one dose of vaccine and five days for those who received two.

Dr. Yousaf continues, “As with COVID-19 disease, clinicians and researchers are still learning about MIS-C. Our survey highlights the challenges of diagnosing MIS-C, the importance of considering alternative diagnoses, and the need to monitor MIS-C disease. [2]

The authors note some additional limitations to their study. It is possible that some of the identified cases of MIS-C had other inflammatory diseases with similar symptoms, as there is no definitive test to diagnose MIS-C. Because laboratory tests for COVID-19, including antibody tests, are imperfect, some cases may have been misclassified. Children often have mild or asymptomatic infection, and milder infections may be less likely to generate antibodies, which can lead to previous undetected infections. It is also possible that not all cases of MIS-C post-vaccination were reported to the surveillance system, which could lead to under-reporting of the number of cases.

Writing in a linked comment, lead author Dr Mary Beth Son of Boston Children’s Hospital, USA (who was not involved in the study), says: “Their findings are overall quite reassuring. Cases of MIS-C after COVID-19 vaccination have been reported in only 1 in a million people aged 12 to 20 who received one or more doses of a COVID-19 vaccine, and 15 (71%) of 21 people with MIS-C had a laboratory test. evidence of prior SARS-CoV-2 infection, casting doubt on attribution. This timely report is of particular interest to healthcare providers, scientists and policymakers, given the continued and widespread transmission of the omicron variant (B.1.1.529). …As the pandemic continues to challenge our global community and the scrutiny of COVID-19 vaccines persists, the report by Yousaf and colleagues is a welcome addition to the growing literature supporting the safety and effectiveness of vaccination against SARS CoV-2.

NOTES TO EDITORS

This study was funded by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). It was conducted by researchers from the CDC COVID-19 Response Team.

The labels were added to this news release as part of a project led by the Academy of Medical Sciences to improve evidence reporting. For more information, please see: http://www.sciencemediacentre.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/AMS-press-release-labelling-system-GUIDANCE.pdf if you have any questions or comments , please contact The Lancet Press Office pressoffice@lancet.com

[1] Using a denominator of SARS-CoV-2 infections in unvaccinated people, a previous study from April to June 1, 2020 estimated an MIS-C rate of 224 per million SARS-CoV infections -2 in children aged 11-15 and 164 per million in 16-20 year olds: https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamanetworkopen/fullarticle/2780861

[2] Direct quote from the author and not found in the text of the article.

[3] The researchers identified possible cases from the CDC’s national MIS-C surveillance system, the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (co-administered by the CDC and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration), and the Project CDC Clinical Immunization Safety Assessment.

IF YOU WISH TO PROVIDE A LINK TO YOUR READERS, PLEASE USE THE FOLLOWING LINK, WHICH WILL BE LIVE WHEN THE EMBARGO IS LIFTED: http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lanchi/article/PIIS2352-4642(22)00028-1/fulltext


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WHO/Europe urges governments to include young people in decisions about their health https://surroundhealth.net/who-europe-urges-governments-to-include-young-people-in-decisions-about-their-health/ Fri, 11 Feb 2022 14:11:05 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/who-europe-urges-governments-to-include-young-people-in-decisions-about-their-health/ WHO/Europe has released new guidance on how to involve adolescents and young people in decision-making about their health. The new guide calls on governments and decision-makers to listen to and understand the perspectives, experiences and needs of young people when developing policies or decisions affecting their health. These may include, for example, policies that are […]]]>

WHO/Europe has released new guidance on how to involve adolescents and young people in decision-making about their health.

The new guide calls on governments and decision-makers to listen to and understand the perspectives, experiences and needs of young people when developing policies or decisions affecting their health. These may include, for example, policies that are part of a national child and adolescent health strategy, or those related to youth and adolescent health services.

“Policymakers have a professional and moral responsibility to ensure that any policy that affects young people’s health truly includes young people at all stages,” said Dr Natasha Azzopardi Muscat, Country Health Policy and Systems Director at WHO/Europe. “This means that young people must be included in the development and implementation of these health policies, whether they impact their health at school, in their communities or at national and international levels.”

In a survey conducted in 2020, WHO/Europe found that only 8 countries in the European Region involved children in the review, development and implementation of a child health strategy and the teenager. Twenty countries involved them in only 1 or 2 of these steps, and 6 did not involve young people at all.

“Youth engagement has the potential to provide important and sometimes unexpected insights into the challenges young people face,” explained Dr Azzopardi Muscat. “And it’s clear that we have room for improvement.”

Reflecting the needs of young people in the European Region

The new guide is based on surveys and consultations with young people across the European Region over the past two years. Many young people involved shared their desire to be heard and their willingness to participate in decisions affecting their health and well-being.

The new guide supports governments and local decision makers with advice on:

  • prepare young people for their commitment;
  • engaging with young people through consultations and how to provide feedback;
  • follow the young people and share with them the results and action points.

The guide also includes concrete examples of successful youth involvement. These include the July 2021 multi-stakeholder consultation to promote adolescent health and well-being in the European Region, led by WHO/Europe and the Partnership for Maternal, Newborn and (PMNCH), in collaboration with the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) and the United Nations population (UNFPA). As part of this consultation, young people were actively involved in the facilitation and co-facilitation of thematic sessions.

By actively involving young people in a youth-friendly environment in the same way, policy makers can ensure that policies affecting young people respond to their needs and perspectives.

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NBC 26 Today interviews an expert on adolescent health https://surroundhealth.net/nbc-26-today-interviews-an-expert-on-adolescent-health/ Wed, 09 Feb 2022 13:55:00 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/nbc-26-today-interviews-an-expert-on-adolescent-health/ GREEN BAY, Wis. (NBC 26) – NBC 26 spoke today with Dr. Megan Moreno, adolescent health expert at UW Health Kids in Madison. Many parents may be wondering at this time of year how to keep their children healthy while coping with the cold winter months, as well as the COVID-19 pandemic. Winter weather and […]]]>

GREEN BAY, Wis. (NBC 26) – NBC 26 spoke today with Dr. Megan Moreno, adolescent health expert at UW Health Kids in Madison.

Many parents may be wondering at this time of year how to keep their children healthy while coping with the cold winter months, as well as the COVID-19 pandemic.

Winter weather and ongoing COVID may limit activities for children and teens. This may mean that children and teenagers connect more through screens. Parents can ensure children and teens use technology to support their health.

Make sure your child is getting what they need to be physically healthy. These things include:

  • Sleep: Depending on your child’s age, he needs 8 to 12 hours of sleep each night. Help your child establish a soothing bedtime routine so they can fall asleep quickly and get all the sleep they need. Some ways to use devices to start the transition to bedtime might include playing soft music or listening to a storytelling podcast with your child. An excellent one is the “Stories” podcast. Current recommendations are to avoid looking at screens (browsing or scrolling) one hour before bedtime.
  • Physical activity: It can be more difficult to do physical activity in the winter when the temperature is low. Consider creative indoor activities such as dancing to music, or incorporating gaming systems such as “dance dance revolution”, or watching YouTube videos such as lean dancing or yoga.
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Adolescent Health and Sexual Reproduction Fair in Asiwa https://surroundhealth.net/adolescent-health-and-sexual-reproduction-fair-in-asiwa/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 16:59:10 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/adolescent-health-and-sexual-reproduction-fair-in-asiwa/ [ad_1] Teenager’s Lounge An adolescent health fair was organized for more than 100 adolescent girls, including girls with disabilities in Asiwa, Bosome Freho district. The fair organized by the Alliance for Reproductive Health Rights (ARHR) in collaboration with Responsibilities Initiatives Ghana (RRIG) aimed to raise girls’ awareness of their sexual and reproductive health rights and […]]]>


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Teenager’s Lounge

An adolescent health fair was organized for more than 100 adolescent girls, including girls with disabilities in Asiwa, Bosome Freho district.

The fair organized by the Alliance for Reproductive Health Rights (ARHR) in collaboration with Responsibilities Initiatives Ghana (RRIG) aimed to raise girls’ awareness of their sexual and reproductive health rights and prevention of sexually transmitted diseases.

It was part of a project called the “Adolescent Girl Project” which is being implemented in the district by the two organizations with funding from the United Nations Fund for Population Activities (UNFPA).

Participants were educated on the causes and prevention of HIV / AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases as they indulged in various games such as ludo, oware, musical chairs, amp and song contest.

The aim was to capture their attention through games and provide them with the right information about the services available to them in health facilities and how to stay as young girls.

People with disabilities have also learned to protect themselves from sexual abuse and gender-based violence because of their vulnerability.

Ms. Victoria Adomako, a health professional who led the discussions, spoke about the dangers of STIs with a focus on HIV / AIDS.

She reminded girls that they have the right to say no to the opposite sex when making sexual advances to them, saying they will experience the stigma and inconvenience if pregnant.

She advised them to focus on their education and forgo romantic relationships that could derail their education as young people.

They should aspire to secure a brighter future by avoiding peers whose company could only lead them astray, she advised.

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Phek District Reviews Adolescent Health Programs | Morung Express https://surroundhealth.net/phek-district-reviews-adolescent-health-programs-morung-express/ Fri, 17 Dec 2021 16:26:56 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/phek-district-reviews-adolescent-health-programs-morung-express/ [ad_1] Dr Kolhitso, District Program Manager, RCH / IPU Phek highlighting the agenda at the December 17th review meeting. (Photo courtesy: District Media Officer, NHM Phek) Phek, December 17 (MExN): A district-level review meeting on Rashtriya Kishor Swasthya Karyakram (National Adolescent Health Program) and adolescent health was held on December 17 at the CMO office, […]]]>


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Dr Kolhitso, District Program Manager, RCH / IPU Phek highlighting the agenda at the December 17th review meeting. (Photo courtesy: District Media Officer, NHM Phek)

Phek, December 17 (MExN): A district-level review meeting on Rashtriya Kishor Swasthya Karyakram (National Adolescent Health Program) and adolescent health was held on December 17 at the CMO office, Phek, during which the performance of health clinics suitable for adolescents and weekly folic iron supplementation were examined.

Currently, Phek has four Adolescent Friendly Health Clinics (AFHC) located at the District Hospital, Community Health Center (CSC) of Pfutsero, Chozuba and Meluri.

According to a press release from the district media officer, NHM Phek, Kutolu Nakro AFHC provides services such as treatment of common illnesses in adolescents, counseling and referral services. As part of the Weekly Iron Folic Supplement (WIFS) program, iron tablets are provided to adolescents, girls and boys, enrolled in public schools and Anganwadi centers.

The objective of the program is to reduce the prevalence and severity of nutritional anemia in the adolescent population and in addition, deworming with albendazole is performed twice a year to control the worm infestation.

The statement said that as part of the RBSK program, a team of doctors and nurses visit schools and AWW centers for anemia screening, early detection of birth defects and common illnesses in adolescents.

The meeting was attended by doctors from AFHC, a vocational trainer from the Phek Government Upper Secondary School and Anganwadi workers from Phek Sadar.

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Lack of medicines and human resources hamper health services for adolescents: study https://surroundhealth.net/lack-of-medicines-and-human-resources-hamper-health-services-for-adolescents-study/ Sun, 12 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/lack-of-medicines-and-human-resources-hamper-health-services-for-adolescents-study/ FE ONLINE REPORT | Published: December 12, 2021 6:39:35 PM | Update: December 14, 2021 4:44:27 p.m. Although the service environment of adolescent health centers across the country has improved, lack of medicines and human resources remain a challenge, according to a new study. The accountability and responsiveness of service providers at adolescent-friendly health service […]]]>