Population health – Surround Health http://surroundhealth.net/ Tue, 27 Sep 2022 12:00:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://surroundhealth.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-68-120x120.png Population health – Surround Health http://surroundhealth.net/ 32 32 How data is driving value-based care and population health https://surroundhealth.net/how-data-is-driving-value-based-care-and-population-health/ Tue, 27 Sep 2022 12:00:00 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/how-data-is-driving-value-based-care-and-population-health/ Philip M. Oravetz, MD, MPH, head of population health at Ochsner Health in Louisiana, has crucial advice for other health systems considering value-based contracts. Before signing, ask your payers to commit to providing claims data. This has been a sticking point for the shift to value-based care for many years, said Dr. Oravetz, who provides […]]]>

Philip M. Oravetz, MD, MPH, head of population health at Ochsner Health in Louisiana, has crucial advice for other health systems considering value-based contracts. Before signing, ask your payers to commit to providing claims data.


This has been a sticking point for the shift to value-based care for many years, said Dr. Oravetz, who provides physician leadership for Ochsner’s value-based contract systems portfolio. These include shared commercial savings and full-risk capitation within Medicare Advantage.

Payers often take a critical view of what is happening with patients relative to physicians and healthcare organizations, “because claims data contains critical practice-level insights,” he said. he declares.

Dr. Oravetz discussed the path to success with Ochsner’s value-based initiatives with Suja Mathew, MD, executive vice president and clinical director of Atlantic Health System, during an AMA Insight Network virtual meeting.

The AMA Insight Network helps AMA Health System program members quickly access innovative ideas, gain peer feedback, network, and discover pilot opportunities.Learn more.

Ochsner Health is the largest integrated delivery system in the Southern Gulf, providing care throughout Louisiana, parts of Mississippi and Alabama. The system enjoyed a 17-year period of growth and expansion, operating two medical schools while overseeing clinical trials and other research, Dr. Oravetz said.

“And now we’ve added this value-based care portfolio,” he said. Value-based contracts operate on four key elements: improving population health to improve quality; enhance the patient care experience; transform fee-for-service into pay-for-value; and ensure the well-being and care of caregivers.

“We have full capitation contracts where we are responsible for all gains and losses, including post-acute pharmacy and hospital care. We take responsibility for the total patient expense, in addition to patient experience and quality,” summarized Dr. Oravetz.

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To achieve good quality results, Ochsner implemented a system to “marry” claims to clinical data in new ways and integrate them into point-of-care practices.

Each practice has a quality coordinator and all data comes from a shared electronic health record. Over the past eight years or so, the health system has integrated data from disease-based registries on diabetes, hypertension, cancer, and other conditions into the workflow of its provider offices.

As soon as a doctor opens a case, they can see where the gaps in care are and begin to fill those gaps. This allows them to have a better view of care as they see patients day in and day out, Dr. Oravetz said.

Using EHRs to examine one patient at a time “is one of the most wasteful things we do in healthcare,” Dr. Oravetz noted. “You really need a platform outside of your EHR…that can organize these claims in a meaningful way.”

Ochsner’s external software platform uses a claims aggregator to estimate total care expenditures for specific patient populations. With this method, “you can start offering interventions one at a time, across the continuum, to start understanding how to reduce variation and make care more effective,” he explained.

Once a health system understands where its high-level savings opportunities lie, it can focus its resources on those programs and take more risk, he continued.

Such changes do not happen overnight. Ochsner’s Medicare Lead Care Organizations, for example, took five years to generate savings and complete enough interventions to impact the total cost of care. Now, these ACOs are successfully generating shared savings.

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Ochsner has also integrated behavioral health resources, social workers, and psychologists into her primary care practices. Under the traditional referral process, patients often have to wait several months before seeing a behavioral health specialist.

Under Ochsner’s system, “I can literally walk you down the hall so we can start your therapy,” Dr. Oravetz said.

The AMA Health System program provides enterprise solutions to equip leaders, physicians, and care teams with resources to contribute to the future of medicine.

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Benefits of digital gateways to meet population health needs https://surroundhealth.net/benefits-of-digital-gateways-to-meet-population-health-needs/ Fri, 23 Sep 2022 13:56:52 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/benefits-of-digital-gateways-to-meet-population-health-needs/ Population health management has become an important skill for hospitals and health systems. But the road to implementing effective pop health strategies is strewn with challenges: monitoring chronic disease rates and preventing community transmission, triaging emergencies from routine health care circumstances, and performing preventive services compel all providers to change their traditional fee-for-service workflow. Advanced […]]]>

Population health management has become an important skill for hospitals and health systems. But the road to implementing effective pop health strategies is strewn with challenges: monitoring chronic disease rates and preventing community transmission, triaging emergencies from routine health care circumstances, and performing preventive services compel all providers to change their traditional fee-for-service workflow.

Advanced healthcare platforms, such as digital gateways, are emerging as an answer to some of these challenges. Digital gateways can help process large amounts of demographic data related to community health and population well-being.

Health Informatics News spoke with Keith Algozzine, CEO of UCM Digital Health, a digital gateway technology provider, to master the above challenges; how digital gateways can contribute to population health; how digital gateways work behind the scenes to achieve goals; and how digital gateways work with enhanced health benefits such as home care and treatment, virtual primary care, and therapies to empower a population to take control of their health for the better.

Q. What are some of the challenges facing successful population health management programs today?

A. More and more organizations are looking for ways to improve the health of the populations they serve. They understand that ‘health’ is more than just ‘health care’ and seek to have a positive impact on health status.

Implementing population health initiatives has its challenges. It takes expertise and experience, which is why many organizations seek out third-party partners to help them implement health improvement initiatives. These initiatives often fall outside the realm of direct care and fall within the realm of social determinants of health.

Once a population health initiative is defined, the challenge is to identify the right people for outreach and to customize the approach to meet the unique needs of patients. Overall health depends on ensuring that patients receive timely medically appropriate preventive care and that patients with chronic conditions are proactively monitored to prevent future complications.

There is no doubt that patient engagement and participation in their care is essential to improving health. For example, many patients know there are things they can do to improve or maintain their health, but fail to do them due to non-health related barriers.

It is not enough to urge someone to see a primary care provider; we must ensure that they have transportation to get to the appointment and that their work schedule or other responsibilities and circumstances do not interfere, making it difficult or impossible to attend a medical appointment in person.

Once an initiative is defined and implemented, patient buy-in, compliance, and tracking results are keys to continued success. Because data isn’t always seamlessly integrated at different points in a patient’s healthcare journey, providers and other organizations don’t always get a complete picture of patient compliance and outcome tracking. .

A robust data platform can be effective in filling this gap. It allows different organizations to have visibility into each other’s data and information, allowing for a more complete understanding of that patient’s health.

Q. You suggest that digital gateways can help healthcare provider organizations overcome some of these challenges. How?

A. Digital gateways can be effective in removing barriers while ensuring patients have continuity of care tailored specifically to their individual needs. Provider organizations are often unable to reach the patients who would benefit most from population health programs.

Digital health and digital gateways can be an effective way to provide any patient with access to a medical or mental health provider, removing barriers by allowing patients to connect via phone, chat, video or even asynchronously. Care can start digitally, but can extend to the home with a combination of hands-on support from healthcare professionals working virtually alongside telemedicine providers.

Programs can be created for the proactive identification and outreach of the right populations to perform wellness visits, fill gaps in care, and address social determinants of health by connecting to community resources , for example.

Moving from a medical appointment to a virtual visit can break down a host of barriers and enable the success of population health initiatives. For example, with digital-first care, the patient does not have to worry about travel and transportation to get to the appointment. Travel time and money are saved.

Productivity is earned at work and at home. Getting away from work or household responsibilities for a few minutes for a virtual tour may be more doable for many people than skipping several hours for a round trip to and from an in-person appointment. A virtual provider can even visit a home via video to identify hazards or other social determinants of health and help the patient with next steps to address them.

You can’t act if you don’t know. In a traditional healthcare setting, information is fragmented. Collecting health and non-health information allows you to determine actions that can be taken to improve a patient’s health. An effective data platform can facilitate data sharing and integration, providing providers and other organizations with complete visibility of patient health information, including the ability to track compliance and program outcomes. population health.

An effective data platform can solve data interoperability issues, which further facilitates population health initiatives. For example, platforms may have the ability to understand and translate different sets of codes across organizations so that they can achieve a common understanding of patient data and information, thereby improving health outcomes.

Q. How do Digital Gateways work behind the scenes to achieve these goals?

A. Patients want convenience, and a digital entryway can provide it. Digital entry doors can be opened 24/7/365, allowing patients access when they really need it, with often no or minimal wait times.

The quality of care is equal, if not superior, to care provided in a traditional brick-and-mortar setting. Providers are often able to spend more time with patients and provide personalized, personalized attention and care. For the patient, no time wasted in the waiting room of the doctor’s office, where the patient also risks being exposed to other diseases.

Patient compliance is also higher in the digital space, with data coming from the National Library of Medicine showing that patients are less likely to miss a telemedicine appointment. And with treatments available on demand, no appointment is necessary.

A common data platform can be effective in connecting patient data across organizations to get a complete picture of the patient, enabling holistic care and looking at the patient holistically rather than in discrete, siled medical encounters .

It can be effective in bringing together multiple platform partners that can enable optimal patient care. For example, connecting a partner that offers home labs, as well as a telehealth provider and physical primary care physician, to enable data sharing and collaboration with patient health, appropriate level of care, and best results in mind as goals.

Q. How can digital gateways work with enhanced health benefits, such as home care and treatment, virtual primary care, and therapies, to enable a population to take control of their health for the better?

A. It really is the future of care. Digital gateways can provide a single point of entry and experience for the patient. They provide patients with access to enhanced benefits as they provide access to a range of services to patients in a variety of care settings: virtual emergency and emergency care, virtual mental health care, virtual primary care, care home and more.

Patients can initiate care digitally, get comprehensive care virtually, or continue it at home, if and when they need it. Patients have choice and are empowered to choose how and when they interact with the healthcare system.

We are entering a digital landscape where doctors and paramedics can work together to provide home care as an alternative to an ambulance ride to the hospital emergency room.

We’re seeing 911 systems that can now connect a caller to a nurse navigator or telemedicine physician to meet healthcare needs without an hour-long wait in an emergency room, making care more accessible, affordable and safer. . And uses scarce healthcare resources wisely, for example by allowing paramedics and 911 centers to focus on real emergencies.

Digital gateways can offset many things that our healthcare system should be doing but isn’t doing. How much better would a patient be if the health care provider came back with them three days after a virtual visit to make sure the treatment and recovery was going as planned?

How would this digital engagement and tracking further increase compliance with population health programs, as well as patient satisfaction and overall health? A digital presence is clearly the future of care, enabling providers to make meaningful connections with the patient and other organizations and engage the patient in their health.

Twitter: @SiwickiHealthIT
Email the author: bsiwicki@himss.org
Healthcare IT News is a HIMSS Media publication.

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Dobbs takes the reins of Population Health, determined to make a difference https://surroundhealth.net/dobbs-takes-the-reins-of-population-health-determined-to-make-a-difference/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 17:47:58 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/dobbs-takes-the-reins-of-population-health-determined-to-make-a-difference/ Listen to this article By: Andrea Wright Dilworth, [email protected] Although Dr. Thomas Dobbs spent most of his career as a public health official, a career in medicine was not his first choice. As an applied physics major at Emory University, he intended to become a theoretical physicist. A summer spent at the university hospital, where […]]]>
Listen to this article

By: Andrea Wright Dilworth, [email protected]

Although Dr. Thomas Dobbs spent most of his career as a public health official, a career in medicine was not his first choice. As an applied physics major at Emory University, he intended to become a theoretical physicist.

A summer spent at the university hospital, where he learned that working in health care is a marriage of science, service, and the humanities, changed the Alabama native’s mind.

“It seemed like the right thing,” he said. “I was very smart, but I was never going to win a Nobel Prize.”

Three decades later, the new dean of the John D. Bower School of Population Health at the University of Mississippi Medical Center appears to have made the smart decision about his career trajectory.

As dean, he leads a school made up of three departments: data science, which focuses on extracting knowledge and insights from data; population health sciences, which trains graduates to use policies, programs, and other interventions to improve health outcomes and reduce disparities; and Preventive Medicine, which, shared with the School of Medicine, trains health professionals to prevent disease and promote the health of individuals and populations.

“If you think about health care, we take care of individuals, which is very important to do,” the dean explained. “But when you think of population health, we think of the health of the whole population and the conditions that promote the health or lack of health of a community.”

Only about 20% of a person’s well-being is related to access to clinical health care, Dobbs said. The other 80% comes from environmental factors: the community you live in, access to education and healthy food, and healthy behaviors.

“So it’s all these other things that in the United States we ignored more than we paid attention to,” he said. “And that’s what population health does.” We’re trying to say, ‘Hey, we’re never going to be healthy if we keep throwing money at health care.’

“When we look at other developed countries around the world that are much healthier than us, is that because they’ve invested a lot more money in health care? Of course not. It’s because they have policies, approaches and support systems that make it more likely that people will be healthy, unlike here where it’s extremely difficult to even walk. Our activity will therefore be weak. It’s super easy to get access to unhealthy foods because they’re cheap, they taste good, and they’re easy. So in the United States, it’s hard to be healthy.

Prior to assuming this role, Dobbs served the Mississippi State Department of Health as State Epidemiologist and Regional, Deputy, and State Health Officer, the latter of whom led the state’s response to the COVID pandemic and addressed the health inequities plaguing the state. He has also held national and international leadership positions in the fight against diseases such as HIV and tuberculosis.

Still, his college administrative experience was “light” prior to this appointment, he said.

What he doesn’t miss, Dobbs said, is engaging communities, understanding what’s happening outside the walls of academia, having connections, and having seen the real impact of determinants. social impact on individuals and communities.

“And having had other leadership roles that involve varying degrees of stress and challenge, having weathered some of them and learned from them, I hope I can bring something to the school.”

Dr. Scott Rodgers, associate vice chancellor for academic affairs, said Dobbs brings a wealth of experience to the position.

“In his role as state health officer for the Mississippi State Department of Health, Dr. Dobbs had responsibility for a large organization that worked to meet the health care needs of the approximately 3 million of people residing in Mississippi,” Rodgers said. “He has traveled throughout the state, meeting people where they live, interacting and learning from community leaders, and extending a helping hand wherever and whenever possible. Dr. Dobbs is not afraid of hard work and he possesses a high level of compassion and courage that has allowed him to succeed in his role for the state.

“In his new role as Dean of the School of Population Health, we look to him to bring to the work the determination and vision that we already know from him, so that he develops academic and outreach programs that help meet the needs of our fellow citizens. He has just the right mix of experience, wisdom, skill and transformative spirit to succeed at a high level, and we can’t wait to see what the future holds for his school. We are in exceptional hands.

A month and a half after taking office, Dobbs has set himself some short-term goals. One is to increase enrollment, which stands at 58 students. He also wants to provide what he calls a “population-based mentality” and educational program to other UMMC schools.

“Long term, we have the opportunity to be a world-class public health research institution,” Dobbs said. “It’s partly because we live in the nexus of all the bad things that cause poor health. Not only will we have things that can make a difference, but there will be opportunities with external partners doing research to bring grants in. We now have great researchers, but to grow the whole program into a world-class research operation, educating future health leaders about population health and all of its various intricacies.

Dobbs said he wants the school to be a “force to drive, induce and catalyze change” in the state, especially in areas that make communities unhealthy that other medical professionals don’t. don’t have time to concentrate.

“Mississippi has a separate education system,” he said. “And nobody really cares. But that’s what population health is all about. It’s that kind of thing, taking a mirror to ourselves and kind of helping bring those people together that can make things different.

His average day so far is changing, Dobbs said. On paper, he spends 70% of each week doing administrative work and teaching, 20% on infectious diseases and clinical work through an appointment at the Department of Medicine’s Division of Infectious Diseases, and 10 % allocated to the health department that manages the Carrefour. Sexual Health Clinic.

In doing so, he works closely with the Jackson Heart Study, the Myrlie Evers-Williams Institute for Eliminating Health Disparities, specialty care for adults, and people living with HIV.

“It’s a nice balance. The pleasure of variety. Things overlap,” he said of his responsibilities. “It also allows me to be a part of public health, and having this health department appointment helps maintain that relationship, because population health and public health go hand in hand.”

He is also excited to work with Dr. Saurabh Chandra, Director of Telehealth, to advance telehealth opportunities for people at risk of or living with HIV.

The feeling is mutual, said Chandra, who shared these statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: About 12,000 people are living with HIV in Mississippi and 4,500 at high risk of developing HIV, less than 25% of whom are prescribed pre-exposure prophylaxis drugs.

The telehealth center worked with the Department of Infectious Diseases to develop an app that will provide education and access to care for patients at high risk of HIV, Chandra said. Called UMMC HIV Cares, it will be available via app stores in the coming weeks.

“We are very pleased to partner with Dr. Dobbs and leverage his knowledge and expertise to make this app available to high-risk patients across the state, as well as provide access to healthcare through telemedicine to patients already diagnosed with HIV.”

Dobbs invites others interested in pursuing a population health program to reach out on forming partnerships.

Outside of work, being a doctor seems to be a family affair. He enjoys spending time these days with his wife, Dr. Kimberly Dobbs, a pulmonary and critical care physician at UMMC. Having worked in different cities for eight of the past 10 years, it’s nice to live and work together, he said. She joined the staff in July, a month before her appointment.

The parents of two children, one in medical school and the other in college, met during their first year of medical school and were married two years later.

Dobbs himself is not the family’s first doctor; his grandfather and great-grandfather were doctors.

The legacy brings him back to why he went into medicine.

“I think we all want to make a difference in one way or another. And I hope we will make differences in a good way.

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CPSI Announces Strategic Partnership with i2i Population Health to Ease the Complexity of Quality Program Reporting and Help Improve Patient Outcomes https://surroundhealth.net/cpsi-announces-strategic-partnership-with-i2i-population-health-to-ease-the-complexity-of-quality-program-reporting-and-help-improve-patient-outcomes/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 15:00:00 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/cpsi-announces-strategic-partnership-with-i2i-population-health-to-ease-the-complexity-of-quality-program-reporting-and-help-improve-patient-outcomes/ MOBILE, Alabama–(BUSINESS WIRE)–CPSI (NASDAQ:CPSI), a healthcare solutions company, today announced its partnership with i2i Population Health, a leading national population health technology company serving more than 30 million of lives in 40 states, with quality measurement and reporting covering approximately 22 quality programs. Through this collaboration, CPSI and i2i provide population health management (PHM) capabilities […]]]>

MOBILE, Alabama–(BUSINESS WIRE)–CPSI (NASDAQ:CPSI), a healthcare solutions company, today announced its partnership with i2i Population Health, a leading national population health technology company serving more than 30 million of lives in 40 states, with quality measurement and reporting covering approximately 22 quality programs.

Through this collaboration, CPSI and i2i provide population health management (PHM) capabilities that can improve community health and patient satisfaction. i2i’s first integrated PHM platform also enables CPSI customers to improve quality performance, increase revenue and reimbursement.

This unique partnership provides a set of solutions that solve quality management and the ability to scale to APM. Customers will have the ability to analyze EHR Evident System data and execute care coordination programs that close gaps in care and improve community well-being.

Together, CPSI and i2i provide solutions that meet and improve quality program performance requirements specific to patient-level quality metrics and increase reimbursement opportunities by participating in government, managed care, or commercial programs.

“National and state programs often have complex reporting requirements that change on a regular basis, leading provider organizations to invest in more manpower resources to maintain and comply,” said Justin Neece, Director general of i2i. “It’s not uncommon for hospitals to participate in 5-7 programs – and that number continues to accelerate with the growth of Medicaid expansion and the evolution of Medicare. This partnership helps provider organizations with limited resources do more with less through proven technology solutions that leverage community health programs.

According to Chris Fowler, President and CEO of CPSI, “This partnership and joint offering aligns well to meet the growing demand from hospitals and providers to participate in alternative payment models. Our customers – hospitals and their providers – need tools that help them both improve the quality of care they provide and maximize reimbursement.

Neece and Jody Harbor, CPSI Senior Vice President of Product Management, will co-present Integrated Quality and Care Management in Rural Health Care on Thursday, September 22, 2022, at the NRHA Rural Health Clinic and at the CAH conference in Kansas City, MO.

About CPSI

CPSI is a leading provider of healthcare solutions and services. Founded in 1979, CPSI is the parent company of six companies – Evident, LLC, American HealthTech, Inc., TruBridge, LLC, iNetXperts, Corp. d/b/a Get Real Health, TruCode LLC and Healthcare Resource Group, Inc. Our combined companies are focused on improving the health of the communities we serve, connecting communities for a better patient care experience and improving our customers’ financial operations. Evident provides comprehensive EHR solutions to community hospitals and their affiliated clinics. American HealthTech is one of the nation’s largest providers of EHR solutions and services for post-acute care facilities. TruBridge is focused on providing commercial, consulting and managed IT services, as well as its complete RCM solution, for all care environments. Get Real Health focuses on solutions to improve patient engagement for individuals and healthcare providers. TruCode provides medical coding software that enables complete and accurate code assignment for optimal reimbursement. HRG provides specialized RCM solutions for installations of all sizes. For more information, visit www.cpsi.com.

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Population health is the new public health https://surroundhealth.net/population-health-is-the-new-public-health/ Sun, 18 Sep 2022 10:45:19 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/population-health-is-the-new-public-health/ America can move toward a transformed healthcare system accountable for our well-being and a new population health paradigm, led by healthcare professionals. COVID-19 has wrecked America’s healthcare system and cast a harsh light on the social determinants of health. In doing so, the virus – and more importantly, its consequences – exposed a truth that […]]]>

America can move toward a transformed healthcare system accountable for our well-being and a new population health paradigm, led by healthcare professionals.

COVID-19 has wrecked America’s healthcare system and cast a harsh light on the social determinants of health.

In doing so, the virus – and more importantly, its consequences – exposed a truth that my colleagues and I have been preaching for more than a decade: the public health paradigm is outdated and insufficient. Its major tenets – including public health, epidemiology, behavioral science and the environment – ​​are important but reactive.

We must also consider the quality and safety of the care we provide, the cost of that care, and a range of changing public policy considerations.

The healthcare profession

Healthcare is the biggest business in this country, but we rarely stop to consider what exactly that business has become.

Do health care providers have a mission to improve and maintain health? Or is our goal just to perform more procedures and fill all those beds?

The vast majority of physicians I know feel too disconnected from the system to respond. They see themselves as pawns or, worse, victims when they should be leading the charge in the population health paradigm, which balances treating the sick with keeping people healthy. The widening of disparities in care and the precariousness of SDOH require it.

Consider the social determinants in a city like Philadelphia, where I have worked for the past three decades. Ours is the poorest of the top ten cities in terms of population. A quarter of Philadelphians live in poverty and half are in extreme poverty, which means they cannot put food on the table. At the height of the pandemic, queues for food exceeded queues for medical aid.

It is therefore not surprising that the death rate for people of color is much higher than for other patient demographics. The inequality inherent in our system guaranteed a lack of access, a lack of resources and a lack of insurance for those who were constantly exposed to the virus because they had to work in jobs in contact with the public.

Lead from within

Doctors are not social workers, but we can always work to stop the disease at the source, when it’s still a drip, rather than waiting to tackle it downstream, when it’s became a flood.

Imagine if the people of Philadelphia were healthier before Covid; if we had less inequality, we could have reduced the incredible mortality rate of minority populations. If only we had paid attention to obesity, smoking, heart disease, exercise, nutrition – lesser issues that the system has largely ignored because there was no incentive to do otherwise. Indeed, the flood fills many beds.

As an academic, I have been advocating for a population health paradigm for over a decade. This means changing undergraduate and graduate medical curricula. Let’s bring the principles of population health to UME and GME.

Is it possible that the pandemic gave us a boost to finally get this information into the program? I hope the answer is “yes” and that we will soon see pharmacy schools, nursing schools and medical schools integrating the principles we preached before Covid. I also hope that we will see digital health care that continues to reduce marginal costs. These two changes will allow us to reach much larger populations at a lower cost than ever before.

There is a caveat: change will only come from within. The health system has become so large, so convoluted and so fortified by commercial interests that its revolutionaries, like my colleagues who defend population health practices, will have to build the equivalent of a Trojan horse to effect change .

Fortunately, and unfortunately, Covid has taught us that the system is not as solid as it seems. Leadership failures, racial inequities, public health mistakes, and institutional collapses — including in public health — have exposed a fragile core surrounded by thick, high walls.

Let’s get past these walls, assess the rot, and identify the root causes of how COVID-19 wrecked the healthcare system, killing over a million Americans. Even without new laws or government policies, I am confident that America can move toward a transformed healthcare system accountable for our well-being and a new population health paradigm, led by healthcare professionals. Failure to do so would be professional misconduct.

— David B. Nash, MD, MBA, is a member of the MediGuru Advisory Board, as well as Founding Dean Emeritus of the Jefferson College of Population Health and Dr. Raymond C. and Doris N. Grandon Professor of Health Policy, on the campus of Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

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Improve SE population health management and collaborative care https://surroundhealth.net/improve-se-population-health-management-and-collaborative-care/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 23:30:39 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/improve-se-population-health-management-and-collaborative-care/ Ryan Haumschild, Doctor of Pharmacy, MS, MBA: Let’s talk about access and affordability. It’s great to have wonderful therapies for heart failure, but if patients aren’t able to fulfill them or if they don’t stick with those therapies, we’re not going to see those positive benefits for health. How do we discuss population health management […]]]>

Ryan Haumschild, Doctor of Pharmacy, MS, MBA: Let’s talk about access and affordability. It’s great to have wonderful therapies for heart failure, but if patients aren’t able to fulfill them or if they don’t stick with those therapies, we’re not going to see those positive benefits for health. How do we discuss population health management approaches for heart failure, but also identify an opportunity for us to improve care? I want to start this first question to Dr. Uppal. We talked earlier about how we’re going to treat many of these patients the same whether they have preserved or reduced ejection fraction. [EF]. But how can we begin to identify and treat heart failure patients who are at risk of poor health outcomes among themselves? How do you stratify these risks to identify those who need faster intervention or intensive therapy sooner to slow progression and give them better outcomes?

Rohit Uppal, MD, MBA, SFH: Excellent question. The advantage of being a hospitalist is that we have a lot of data at our disposal. Many indicators of high risk, including morbidity and mortality, are available in the hospital setting. We still have a BNP [brain natriuretic peptide]. We have the GFR of the patient [glomerular filtration rate]. These patients are on telemetry, so we identify ventricular arrhythmias. We know their EF. We know if they needed inotropes. We took our story, so we know them NYHA [New York Heart Association] to classify. We know if they have been intolerant to medical therapy. All of these indices help us to stratify high-risk patients according to their medical characteristics. You have to combine that with the social determinants of health, which also add to that risk.

Once you have identified high-risk patients, it is a daunting challenge for any clinician, and certainly for hospitalists, to address all of the medical and social issues in this population. We just talked about team care. It takes a whole village to care for these very high-risk patients. One of the ways we train our clinicians is to give them the knowledge and skills to have effective conversations about advanced care planning with these patients. It is essential to make advanced care planning a standard component of our care for these patients. This improves their quality of life and has an impact on the cost of care.

Emphasizing this team approach, you need to have an effective multidisciplinary team that includes nurses, case managers, pharmacists, social workers, and nutritionists. I hope you have a palliative care team and palliative care practitioners in your facility or in your community. Another important part of the team for these patients is the advanced heart failure team or cardiologists. You want to involve them early on to help manage some of those important decisions.

Ryan Haumschild, Doctor of Pharmacy, MS, MBA: Dr Uppal, you talked about team care and so many great team members that come into play. Another one I think about a lot is the payer. They are part of the team in terms of patient care. They provide support. Dr. Murillo, from your perspective, what are some of the payer-level support programs for heart failure patients, whether it’s case management or some type of navigator? Is there a better opportunity for us to work more closely together for these at-risk patients to enroll them in these programs and to have better management and oversight?

Jaime Murillo, MD: I love this question. Thank you for asking this question. As I mentioned earlier, health plans are taking a more active role in helping people be healthier and helping the system work better for everyone. There are many ways. There are pilots across the country from different payers on remote patient monitoring and working with ACOs [accountable care organizations]health systems and employers on how to better care for these patients, better prevent them from having complications, etc.

You’d be surprised to learn that health plans are eager to collaborate and establish innovative interventions to help people. Heart failure is a critical area. If there is an area where it is possible to collaborate with a health plan, and there is innovative thinking about it, I would encourage our viewers, especially those who practice medicine, to go to health plans and to say, “Let’s work together”. It’s not just about negotiating a contract about how to pay. Ask: “What can we do together to improve the health of our patients?” They will be very receptive. Thank you for this question.

Ryan Haumschild, Doctor of Pharmacy, MS, MBA: Yes, I also like this approach. It is a collaborative front. Dr. Uppal, when we think of population health, when I think of any type of patient, especially heart failure, we have to have measures of success. We want to know that our interventions have been successful. We are able to monitor and track them over time. As a scientist and a physician, you are aware of this. What interventions are you trying to do? What metrics do you monitor to see what kind of impact they have on our patient outcomes?

Rohit Uppal, MD, MBA, SFH: One of the challenges we face along the continuum is integrating all the data sources we have. In the hospital space – we also get data from payers – some of the metrics we monitor are length of hospital stay; readmission rates at 3 days, 7 days, 30 days and 90 days; mortality rates; palliative and palliative care referral rates; and cardiology reference rates. We also look at our patient experience scores, which are a powerful driver of patient adherence once they leave the hospital.

Ryan Haumschild, Doctor of Pharmacy, MS, MBA: Dr. Anderson, I have a question for you. Can you discuss some of your organization’s best practices to guide appropriate care? Do you have care pathways? Do you have specific guidelines, policies, EMRs [electronic medical records]? How can this guideline-based pathway also influence heart failure treatment from a payer’s perspective?

John E. Anderson, MD: That’s an excellent question. I will answer it in 2 parts. At the hospital, we have excellent therapy based on guidelines. We have expectations from a number of organizations about what is expected and what guideline therapy is. When you come in as an outpatient, some have it and some don’t. For example, I have nothing built into my EMR system that causes SGLT2 inhibition or ARNI [angiotensin receptor-neprilysin inhibitor]. We could do a better job by taking a systematic approach.

Ryan Haumschild, Doctor of Pharmacy, MS, MBA: It seems like the systematic approach is probably the right way to go because you want to create consistency. Dr. Januzzi, what are some of the best practices you’ve seen? Are these order sets in the DME? What do you see to create this consistent practice?

Jim Januzzi, MD: Each institution has a different opportunity. We use guideline-directed medical therapy [GDMT] clinical approach. Integration into the electronic medical record is an interesting approach that has not been sufficiently explored. The recent PROMPT-HF trial of the Yale University system showed that a prompting approach to DME improved GDMT. It’s important to note that it took 10 prompts before a change was made, so it’s worth pointing out that while this sounds like a potentially useful way to improve care, there’s still work to be done. to better understand how to encourage clinicians to follow the prompts we’re telling them. Because you can ask all day, but if they don’t make the changes, it won’t necessarily improve the care.

Ultimately, it comes down to education. The American College of Cardiology Expert Consensus Decision Path that focuses on this approach also comes with a smartphone app that clinicians can use at the bedside or in the office. This is another way to take advantage of new techniques and technologies to learn how to use GDMT effectively.

Ryan Haumschild, Doctor of Pharmacy, MS, MBA: I like strategies. There are plenty of apps out there, but if they’re at your fingertips and offer best practice, that’s not a bad thing to have.

Transcript edited for clarity.

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Global population health management market expected to grow at a rate of 20% through 2026 https://surroundhealth.net/global-population-health-management-market-expected-to-grow-at-a-rate-of-20-through-2026/ Fri, 09 Sep 2022 12:42:00 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/global-population-health-management-market-expected-to-grow-at-a-rate-of-20-through-2026/ Global Population Health Management Market Report 2022 – Global Market Size, Trends and Forecast 2022-2026 The Business Research Company Global Population Health Management Market Report 2022 – Global Market Size, Trends and Forecast 2022-2026 LONDON, GREATER LONDON, UK, September 9, 2022 /EINPresswire.com/ — According ‘Global Population Health Management Market Report 2022 – Global Market Size, […]]]>

Global Population Health Management Market Report 2022 – Global Market Size, Trends and Forecast 2022-2026

The Business Research Company Global Population Health Management Market Report 2022 – Global Market Size, Trends and Forecast 2022-2026

LONDON, GREATER LONDON, UK, September 9, 2022 /EINPresswire.com/ — According ‘Global Population Health Management Market Report 2022 – Global Market Size, Trends and Forecasts 2022-2026” published by The Business Research Company, the population health management market size is expected to reach $79.81 billion in 2026 with a CAGR of 19.7 %. Growing demand for solutions supporting value-based care delivery by healthcare sector shareholders is expected to propel the growth of the population health management industry in the future.

Want to know more about the growth of the population health management market? Request a sample now.
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The population health management market includes sales of population health management solutions and related services by entities (organizations, sole proprietors, and partnerships) used to improve the health outcomes of a group identifying and monitoring patients. Population health management refers to the process of improving the clinical health outcomes of a defined group of individuals through patient involvement and better coordination of care and is supported by financial and care.

Global Population Health Management Market Trends
Product innovation is a key trend gaining popularity in the global population health management market. Major companies operating in population health management are looking for the development of new products to strengthen their position in the global population health management market. For example, in October 2021, Verana Health, a US-based clinical database provider operating in the global population health management market, launched VeraQ, a population health data engine. population. VeraQ converts raw, unfiltered health data into a unique, actionable real data asset, Q Data, from which business insights and clinical research can be derived.

Segments of the global population health management market
By component: software, service
By delivery method: on-premises, cloud-based
By end user: suppliers, payers, others
By Geography: The Global Population Health Management Market analysis report is segmented into North America, South America, Asia-Pacific, Eastern Europe, Western Europe, Middle East and Africa. Of these regions, North America accounts for the largest share.

Learn more about the Global Population Health Management Market report here
https://www.thebusinessresearchcompany.com/report/population-health-management-global-market-report

The Global Population Health Management Market Report 2022 is part of a series of new reports from The Business Research Company that provides Population Health Management market overviews, analysis and Market size and growth forecasts for the global population health management market, population health management market share, population segments and geographies of the global population health management market Healthcare, Population Health Management Market players, revenue, profiles and market shares of major competitors in the Population Health Management Market. The Global Population Health Management Market report identifies key countries and segments for opportunities and strategies based on market trends and key competitor approaches.

The 2022 Global TBRC Population Health Management Market Report includes information on the following:

Data segmentation: market size, global, by region and country, historical and forecast, and growth rate for 60 geographies

Major Market Players: Allscripts Healthcare LLC, Arcadia, Athenahealth Inc., Citra Health Solutions, Conifer Health Solutions, Cotiviti Inc., Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited, eClinicalWorks, Enli Health Intelligence, Epic Systems Corporation, Evolent Health Inc., Forward Health Group , Koninklijke Philips, Lightbeam Health Solutions, Lumeris Inc., McKesson Corporation, MEDecision Inc., NextGen Healthcare Inc., Optum Inc., Orion Health, IBM Corporation, Accenture plc, Advisory Board, GE Healthcare (General Electric Company), Persivia Inc . , RedBrick Health Corporation, Verscend Technologies Inc. and Welltok Inc.

Regions: Asia-Pacific, China, Western Europe, Eastern Europe, North America, United States, South America, Middle East and Africa.

Country: Australia, Brazil, China, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Japan, Russia, South Korea, UK, USA.
And more.

Looking for something else? Here is a list of similar reports from The Business Research Company:

Global Healthcare RFID Market Report 2022
https://www.thebusinessresearchcompany.com/report/healthcare-rfid-global-market-report

Global Healthcare Cloud Computing Market Report 2022
https://www.thebusinessresearchcompany.com/report/healthcare-cloud-computing-global-market-report

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Tennessee honey bee colonies: population, health in 2022 https://surroundhealth.net/tennessee-honey-bee-colonies-population-health-in-2022/ Sun, 04 Sep 2022 17:54:00 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/tennessee-honey-bee-colonies-population-health-in-2022/ It is estimated that the annual contribution of the bee to the economy of the United States is at least $15 billion. Beyond profitable products and by-products harvested directly from honey bee colonies such as honey, beeswax, propolis and royal jelly, more than 90 different crops – around a third of total crop production in […]]]>

It is estimated that the annual contribution of the bee to the economy of the United States is at least $15 billion. Beyond profitable products and by-products harvested directly from honey bee colonies such as honey, beeswax, propolis and royal jelly, more than 90 different crops – around a third of total crop production in the United States – depend on these prolific pollinators for their survival and prosperity.

A world without bees would be dark; there would be less food for human consumption, less variety among the fruits, vegetables and nuts that are left over, and the impacts of their absence would ripple throughout the entire food web. While the dystopian future is distant, honey bees are nevertheless under threat.

Habitat loss, diseases like colony collapse syndrome, herbicides, pesticides, and pests like the aptly named varroa destructor mite all contribute, often in concert, to high rates of colony decline across the country.

Between 2020 and 2021, beekeepers lost about 45% of their managed bee colonies. The expected or acceptable rate of colony turnover due to natural environmental factors such as winter weather conditions is 20%.

Stacker compiled statistics on Tennessee honey bee populations using the most recent annual data from the United States Department of Agriculture. So far in 2022, settlements are down 22% according to the most recent data from the United States Department of Agriculture.

Beekeepers, researchers and scientists take great care to mitigate the loss of managed colonies by moving honey bees seasonally, feeding them sugar water when flowers are not in bloom to prevent death, renovating or by replenishing colonies when a queen bee dies and expanding existing colonies. to keep them healthy and productive. Still, there is little improvement from year to year, according to colony data.

The dystopian world without bees is not imminent, but the battle for their protection and prosperity is difficult.

Tennessee Honey Bee Population Health

Maximum total colonies, April-June 2022: 11,500
— 4.2% decrease since 2021, 16th largest decrease nationally
Colonies lost, April-June 2022: 4,400
— Increase of 511.1% since 2021
Colonies added, April-June 2022: 9,000
— 87.5% increase since 2021
Colonies renovated, April-June 2022: 1,200
— 64.7% decrease since 2021

States with the highest increase in honey bee colonies from 2021 to 2022

#1. Missouri: 118.8% increase
#2. Arkansas: 76.0% increase
#3. Louisiana: 48.3% increase
#4. Mississippi: 34.3% increase
#5. North Carolina: 30.4% increase

States with the greatest decrease in honey bee colonies from 2021 to 2022

#1. Kansas: 38.8% drop
#2. Illinois: 26.9% decline
#3. Wyoming: 23.3% drop
#4. Indiana: 23.1% drop
#5. Colorado: 22.0% decline

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Global population health management market expected to generate $63.8 billion by 2031: Allied Market Research https://surroundhealth.net/global-population-health-management-market-expected-to-generate-63-8-billion-by-2031-allied-market-research/ Fri, 02 Sep 2022 06:21:32 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/global-population-health-management-market-expected-to-generate-63-8-billion-by-2031-allied-market-research/ Allied Market Research Growing geriatric population, accelerating demand for Internet of Things (IoT) for healthcare, and need to reduce escalating healthcare costs are driving the global healthcare management market Population. In 2020, the increase in the number of patients has led to an increase in the use of EHR and EMR platforms coupled with the […]]]>

Allied Market Research

Growing geriatric population, accelerating demand for Internet of Things (IoT) for healthcare, and need to reduce escalating healthcare costs are driving the global healthcare management market Population. In 2020, the increase in the number of patients has led to an increase in the use of EHR and EMR platforms coupled with the use of population health management solutions. By region, North America held the largest share in 2021.

Portland, OR, Sept. 02, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — The world Population Health Management Market raised USD 19.2 billion in 2021 and is expected to generate USD 63.8 billion by 2031, growing at a CAGR of 12.7% from 2022 to 2031. The report provides in-depth analysis of changing market dynamics , major segments, value chain, competitive scenario and regional landscape. This research offers valuable guidance for key players, investors, shareholders, and startups to design sustainable growth strategies and gain competitive advantage in the market.

Download the report (PDF of 245 pages with information, graphs, tables, figures): https://www.alliedmarketresearch.com/request-sample/2022

Report coverage and details:

Report cover

Details

Forecast period

2022–2031

base year

2021

Market size in 2021

$19.2 billion

Market size in 2031

$63.8 billion

CAGR

12.7%

Number of pages in the report

302

Segments Covered

Component, delivery method, end user and region.

Drivers

Growth of the geriatric population

Accelerating Demand for Internet of Things (IoT) for Healthcare

Need to reduce escalating healthcare costs

Opportunities

Growing focus on personalized medicines

Constraints

High investment cost and cybersecurity issues


Covid-19 scenario:

  • A large number of clinics and hospitals around the world have been restructured to increase hospital capacity for patients diagnosed with COVID-19. Non-essential procedures have taken on a potential backlog, due to the rapid increase in COVID-19 cases. However, the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic has had a positive impact on the growth of the global population health management market.

  • Population health management systems have proven to be very beneficial in 2020, as they have enabled healthcare providers to easily combine solutions such as electronic health records (EHR), patient management and claim management. care.

  • The increase in the patient population has led to an increase in the use of EHR and EMR platforms coupled with the use of population health management solutions, thereby driving the growth of the market.

Specific requirement on COVID-19? Ask our industry expert: https://www.alliedmarketresearch.com/request-for-customization/2022?reqfor=covid

The research provides detailed segmentation of the global population health management market on the basis of component, mode of delivery, end-user, and region. The report discusses the segments and their sub-segments in detail with the help of tables and figures. Market players and investors can strategize based on the most revenue-generating and fastest-growing segments mentioned in the report.

Based on components, the software segment held the highest share in 2021, accounting for nearly two-thirds of the global population health management market, and is expected to maintain its leading status over the period. forecast. Moreover, the same segment is expected to register the highest CAGR of 13.2% from 2022 to 2031. The report also identifies the service segment.

Based on delivery mode, the on-site segment accounted for the highest share in 2021, contributing nearly three-fifths of the global population health management market, and is expected to maintain its revenue lead in during the forecast period. However, the cloud-based segment is expected to show the highest CAGR of 13.3% from 2022 to 2031.

On an end-user basis, the healthcare provider segment accounted for the highest share in 2021, holding more than three-fifths of the global population health management market, and is expected to maintain its status as leader during the forecast period. However, the healthcare payer segment is expected to grow in Highest CAGR of 13.8% during the forecast period.

Inquire about purchasing: https://www.alliedmarketresearch.com/purchase-enquiry/2022

Based on region, North America held the largest share in 2021, contributing more than two-thirds of the total population health management market share, and is expected to maintain its dominant share in terms of revenue in 2031. Additionally, the Asia-Pacific region is expected to show the fastest CAGR of 15.4% during the forecast period. The research also analyzes regions such as Europe and LAMEA.

Key players of the global population health management market analyzed in the research include Allscripts Healthcare Solutions, Inc., Arcadia, AthenaHealth, Inc., Cedar Gate Technologies, Llc (Enli Health Intelligence), Cotiviti, Inc, Eclinicalworks , Epic Systems Corporation, Health Care Service Corporation (Medecision), Health Catalyst, Inc, Health EC, Llc, I2I Population Health, International Business Machines Corporation (IBM Watson Health), Koninklijke Philips NV (Philips Wellcentive), Lightbeam, Nextgen Healthcare, Inc, Oracle Corporation (Cerner Corporation) and UnitedHealth Group (Optum, Inc).

The report provides a detailed analysis of these key players in the global population health management market. These players have adopted different strategies such as new product launches, collaborations, expansion, joint ventures, agreements and others to increase their market share and maintain dominant shares in different regions. The report is valuable for highlighting the business performance, operating segments, product portfolio, and strategic moves of market players to present the competitive scenario.

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“We have also published some syndicated market studies in the same field that you may be interested in. Below is the title of the report for your referenceconsidering the impact of Covid-19 on this market which will help you to assess the aftereffects of the pandemic on the short and long term growth trends of this market.

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How to Care for Vulnerable Migrants Using Population Health Management https://surroundhealth.net/how-to-care-for-vulnerable-migrants-using-population-health-management/ Thu, 01 Sep 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/how-to-care-for-vulnerable-migrants-using-population-health-management/ Recent waves of immigration from Afghanistan and Ukraine have highlighted the importance of primary care in caring for vulnerable migrants. Dr. Ishraga Awad, Dr. Emily Clark, Dr. Adam Harvey-Sullivan and Dr. Nina Amedzro from the Faculty of Public Health Special Interest Group for Primary Care and Public Health outline the actions needed to care for […]]]>

Recent waves of immigration from Afghanistan and Ukraine have highlighted the importance of primary care in caring for vulnerable migrants.

Dr. Ishraga Awad, Dr. Emily Clark, Dr. Adam Harvey-Sullivan and Dr. Nina Amedzro from the Faculty of Public Health Special Interest Group for Primary Care and Public Health outline the actions needed to care for this patient population

The role of primary care as the first point of access to healthcare in the UK is unquestionable in meeting the initial and ongoing healthcare needs of vulnerable migrants. However, although primary care is exempt from billing, many patients – and staff – are unaware of this right to healthcare and fears about costs, detention and deportation mean that migrants are not do not always have access to services.

In addition, primary care services are not uniform across the country for this group, which clearly shows inequalities in quality and quantity. In some areas the charitable sector is relied upon to provide care, in others there are contracts for locally enhanced services for certain practices in dispersal areas or with initial shelter sites. However, in some places, there is no access to care for certain groups placed in initial and emergency accommodation.

There needs to be better training of health professionals on the management of this cohort. While there are many support resources available, and highlighted in this article, there must be mandatory training for NHS frontline clinical and administrative groups and the inclusion of care for vulnerable migrants in first line courses. undergraduate and postgraduate for health professionals.

Providing holistic and appropriate care takes more than a 10-minute responsive consultation focused on acute health needs. This can be done by using a population health management (PHM) approach, as advocated by integrated systems of care (ICS), to address health inequities faced by vulnerable population groups. .

PHM is an approach that uses data to help health and care systems improve health and well-being at the population level. The data is used to: assess the needs of a particular population, such as vulnerable migrants; understand the composition (age, sex, ethnicity) of the population; identify unique morbidities and health risks; identify difficulties in accessing relevant and effective health care; and conduct surveillance activities to monitor health morbidity and outcomes of care.

Demography

  • The latest estimates suggest that the total foreign-born population in the UK stood at around 9.6 million in 2021 and now represents around 14.5% of the total UK population;
  • UNHCR figures for the UK show that in mid-2021 there were around 135,912 refugees, 83,489 pending asylum claims and 3,968 stateless people;
  • Until the year ending June 2021, just under two-thirds of migrants came from outside the EU, with India, Poland and Pakistan being the top three countries of birth for people born outside the EU. from the United Kingdom.

Using a PHM approach, NCPs could determine the number and demographic composition of their vulnerable migrants and the impact of broader determinants of health on them. Teams of social prescribers could potentially engage with community organizations, housing providers and social service teams working with migrants to obtain information about their living and functioning conditions. Migrants themselves could be encouraged to raise their voices through their advocacy groups or directly through action research accessible through partnerships with local universities and public health departments. The impact of broader determinants of health on the physical and mental health of migrants can be assessed in this way. Key determinants are things like good housing and energy accessibility, healthy food, access to education and employment, income generating activities and opportunities for integration with the area of reception. These are factors that have an impact on physical and mental health.

NCPs could also use primary care registration data to identify vulnerable migrants and invite them for initial health assessments to determine if they need an early investigation to determine further treatment for conditions such as tuberculosis and communicable diseases as well as mental health conditions like post-traumatic stress disorder that may have resulted from being in war zones, witnessing violence and the impact of their travels often dangerous towards safety. Some NCPs have already commissioned initial health checks for unaccompanied asylum-seeking children, but this is by no means uniform or accessible to all vulnerable migrants. One of the main challenges of this approach to PSM is the lack of “visibility” of vulnerable migrants in the datasets used to inform commissioners. Often, vulnerability coding in a primary care dataset does not correctly identify migrants/asylum seekers/refugees or their health status. This results in their unique, and often difficult, health needs not being reflected in mainstream population information. Thus, inequalities persist and health needs remain unmet.

Additionally, ethnicity remains poorly coded in medical IT systems and data quality issues disproportionately affect ethnic minority patient records.

We urge clinicians and policy makers at all levels to embrace the philosophy that “coding is caring”.

To ensure that marginalized groups are not “forgotten” by population health approaches, we need to ensure accurate coding of vulnerabilities such as history of torture, history of FGM, need for a translator or status of ‘immigration.

The challenges of access to care for migrants

Healthcare pricing and the wider hostile environment have a significant deterrent effect on migrants using NHS services. Although primary care is exempt from billing, many patients – and staff – are unaware of this right to healthcare. Migrants fear in particular that access to health care will incur unaffordable costs and that data shared with the Home Office could lead to detention, deportation or denial of future asylum claims.

Staff can compound this problem by falsely denying care based on immigration status or GP registration on the grounds that they do not have access to proof of address or identification. Perceptions of discrimination due to immigration status and ethnicity further discourage seeking health care.

Language barriers are particularly challenging for migrants and this is associated with poorer patient experience and poorer patient outcomes. Despite the availability of interpretation services, logistical barriers and time constraints mean that they are often underutilized.

Vulnerable migrants also face health issues associated with deprivation, including indirect costs that limit access, such as transport costs and time off. While policies related to the accommodation of asylum seekers and dispersal further hinder the continuity of care.

Finally, Covid has highlighted and exacerbated health inequalities for vulnerable migrants. Migrants were particularly at risk of exposure and infection from COVID-19. They had worse access to Covid vaccines. And access to health care has been made more difficult due to worsening digital exclusion as health services have made greater use of online and telephone consultations. This has resulted in reduced use of primary care among migrants compared to non-migrants, highlighting further inequality.

Good practice: the war in Ukraine and the crisis in Afghanistan

The 2021 Afghan crisis and 2022 Ukraine war have pushed the needs of migrants in vulnerable situations forward in the minds of the public, the NHS and policy makers. Many good practice examples have been created, including policy and advocacy materials, health translations, information communication cards and toolkits.

These points of good practice can only be used by a self-selected interested group, so as previously stated there should be mandatory training for frontline NHS staff on this issue. In conclusion, one of the main problems with a population health management approach is the lack of “visibility” of vulnerable migrants in the datasets used to inform commissioners. This, combined with the fact that ethnicity is poorly coded, results in the health needs of this population being unmet. We call on clinicians and policy makers at all levels to embrace the philosophy that “coding is caring” so that marginalized groups are not “overlooked” by population health approaches.

This article was written by: Dr Ishraga Awad, general practitioner and public health specialist; Dr. Emily Clark, GP and NIHR Practice Fellow; Dr Adam Harvey-Sullivan, General Practitioner and Primary Care Academic Clinical Researcher, Wolfson Institute of Population Health, Queen Mary University of London; Dr Nina Amedzro, General Practitioner and Registrar of Public Health, Yorkshire and Humber Region.

The authors wrote on behalf of the Faculty of Public Health Special Interest Group for Primary Care and Public Health. More information is available here The next Building Back Better in Primary Care and Public Health webinar will take place from 12:00 to 1:30 p.m. on Wednesday, September 7.

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