One health – Surround Health http://surroundhealth.net/ Thu, 25 Nov 2021 06:55:04 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://surroundhealth.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-68-120x120.png One health – Surround Health http://surroundhealth.net/ 32 32 In the midst of the pandemic outbreak, workers in a health care system are fulfilling different roles https://surroundhealth.net/in-the-midst-of-the-pandemic-outbreak-workers-in-a-health-care-system-are-fulfilling-different-roles/ Wed, 24 Nov 2021 10:00:00 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/in-the-midst-of-the-pandemic-outbreak-workers-in-a-health-care-system-are-fulfilling-different-roles/ As the Director of Emergency Preparedness for CentraCare, Rachel Mockros spends most days during the pandemic in virtual meetings on a computer screen, planning for disasters. But last Friday, Mockros worked as a basic caregiver at St. Benedict’s Care Center, a nursing home in St. Cloud. Wearing blue scrubs with her hair in a bun, […]]]>

As the Director of Emergency Preparedness for CentraCare, Rachel Mockros spends most days during the pandemic in virtual meetings on a computer screen, planning for disasters.

But last Friday, Mockros worked as a basic caregiver at St. Benedict’s Care Center, a nursing home in St. Cloud. Wearing blue scrubs with her hair in a bun, she jostled from room to room as residents pushed their call buttons.

“We help brush our teeth. We help dress,” she said. “We help with anything they may need – brush their hair, go to the bathroom, take a bath.”

Like other healthcare systems, CentraCare – which operates the St. Benedict Health Center, St. Cloud Hospital, and other healthcare facilities in central Minnesota – is overwhelmed by the latest wave of COVID-19 and a staff shortage.

To help alleviate the crisis, CentraCare offers employees the ability to fill where they are needed most, even if it is well outside of their career experience.

The labor pool program began at the start of the pandemic to displace employees whose departments were experiencing less demand.

But it has evolved to give employees interested in working beyond their regular hours the opportunity to help in departments with critical staffing needs, spokeswoman Karna Fronden said.

More than 1,700 workers offered to participate. They receive additional compensation and training, if necessary.

Rachel Mockros (right) chats with Mike Lais, who is a certified nursing assistant. Mockros was taking a shift as a basic care aide in the St. Benedict community of CentraCare.

Paul Middlestaedt for MPR News

Some are healthcare workers who take turns in intensive care units or emergency rooms, where they do not normally work. Some are high-level administrators who clean hospital rooms or fold sheets.

As a leader, Mockros knows how critical extra help is. CentraCare hospitals are overflowing with patients requiring intensive care, and staffing across the system is limited.

“At the heart of it all is that if we don’t send people into the nursing home, we can’t move people out of the hospital,” she said. “Right now we have 50 to 70 people who need to be discharged from the hospital in a long-term care facility and we don’t have beds.

Mockros’ medical training is in community health and health care administration. But in college, she worked at St. Benedict’s as a recreation therapist.

Taking evening and weekend shifts gives her a chance to return to direct patient care, to be more physically active and to feel like she is helping in a crisis, Mockros said.

“When you’re in a managerial position, you’re not always on the front line,” she said. “You are not always at the bedside. So it was really, really fascinating to learn. “

In St. Benedict’s, Mockros is constantly on the move, filling cups with ice water, closing blinds and even taking dirty laundry to the laundry room.

“It’s not glamorous,” she said. “But it’s gratifying because they need help.”

St. Benedict’s nurse’s aide, Michael Lais, said he looked forward to the extra help. He said it’s easier when there are four employees looking after the 33 residents on the third floor, but some days there are only two or three.

“With two people it’s pretty hard for us to do our daily chores here because it’s just not enough hands to help,” Lais said.

A woman takes a glass of water.

Rachel Mockros helps a resident of the St. Benedict community by providing him with water.

Paul Middlestaedt for MPR News

St. Benedict administrator Susan Kratzke said she knew there would be limits to what people could do while doing jobs they weren’t necessarily trained for. But she said they did more than expected.

“People find things to do. They learn fast, ”she said. “They don’t want to just call it bingo. They really want to get involved and do things that make a difference for residents.

Tammy Totz is a CentraCare accountant who worked from home in Clear Lake during the pandemic. But in the evenings and weekends, she dabs patients for COVID-19 at a Waite Park testing site. She also monitors and helps transport patients to the busy emergency room at St. Cloud Hospital.

“If I can do this stuff to free these nurses to take care of a patient, then that’s what I’m going to do,” she said.

The extra chores give her a chance to get out of the house and think about something other than finance and accounting, Totz said. And it gave him a new appreciation for the hard work of frontline workers.

“It’s kind of an eye opener,” Totz said. “You see the nurses and you hear how overworked and stressful it is. And until you actually get there, and you see it, I don’t know if you have that full appreciation of what they’re doing. deal exactly. “

CentraCare employees also said the program makes them feel like they are helping to help their colleagues and patients.

A man slides a tray of food into a cart.

Tim Johnson, a recruiting marketer for CentraCare, slides a tray of food into a cart for delivery to a patient at St. Cloud Hospital.

Courtesy of Tim Johnson

Tim Johnson, a marketing recruiter, works alternate Saturdays putting fruit cups and Jell-O on platters and restocking kitchenettes at St. Cloud Hospital.

“When we’re out there to build trays, it’s not just about filling in what’s on the ticket,” he said. “It’s literally making sure someone can heal. And he’s making sure he’s getting the nourishment his body needs to allow that to happen.”

Melissa Pribyl has been a nurse for 27 years. For the past six years, she has been a community health and wellness specialist for CentraCare Monticello, but she said many of her friends are still working at the hospital.

A health worker stands at a counter.

Community health and wellness specialist Melissa Pribyl works shifts in the emergency room at Monticello Hospital.

Courtesy of Mélissa Pribyl.

“I had a bit of that bad conscience knowing I could help,” Pribyl said. But at first, it was not possible for employees to access jobs by the hour. Once this hurdle was overcome, she began to help in Monticello’s emergency room.

“It’s like a desire in me to be able to help as a nurse for so many years, especially in a small regional hospital, where the staff is minimal anyway,” she said.

Like other health care providers in Minnesota, CentraCare has been hit hard by staff exhaustion and employees fall ill, care for sick family members, or have to be quarantined due to the exposure. COVID-19, said Kathy Parsons, vice president for population health. Some workers are facing childcare issues and some have left to become itinerant nurses, she said.

CentraCare has also lost some employees due to a COVID-19 vaccine mandate that begins Dec. 15, but that hasn’t been a major issue, Parsons said. Employees who refuse to be vaccinated will be put on leave and can return if they decide to be vaccinated, she said.

The labor pool program is scheduled until early January. This is a short-term strategy to deal with the staff shortage as CentraCare strives to recruit and hire more permanent workers.

Kratzke said she can see the Workforce Pool program continuing as a way for people to earn extra income, keep doing something they love and fill a void.

“It will be some time to find the workforce we need in this industry,” she said.

Mockros said she would like to continue taking shifts at St. Benedict from time to time.

“My heart is definitely in long term care,” she said. “I like being with the residents. I like to bond with them. “

You make MPR News possible. Individual donations are the source of the clarity of our reporters’ coverage across the state, the stories that connect us, and the conversations that offer insight. Help ensure that MPR remains a resource that brings Minnesotans together.

Make a donation today. A donation of $ 17 makes a difference.


Source link

]]>
Coppoc One Health conference highlights vaccine acceptance in 2021 https://surroundhealth.net/coppoc-one-health-conference-highlights-vaccine-acceptance-in-2021/ Fri, 19 Nov 2021 17:39:57 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/coppoc-one-health-conference-highlights-vaccine-acceptance-in-2021/ Friday, November 19, 2021 As COVID-19 vaccine issues continue to grab headlines, the Coppoc One Health 2021 conference shed some light on the topic to more than 80 attendees who watched a virtual presentation by Dr. Noni MacDonald, Professor of Pediatrics and Former Dean of Medicine at Dalhousie University and IWK Health Center in Halifax, […]]]>

Friday, November 19, 2021

As COVID-19 vaccine issues continue to grab headlines, the Coppoc One Health 2021 conference shed some light on the topic to more than 80 attendees who watched a virtual presentation by Dr. Noni MacDonald, Professor of Pediatrics and Former Dean of Medicine at Dalhousie University and IWK Health Center in Halifax, Nova Scotia. An infectious disease specialist and vaccinologist, Dr. MacDonald is a passionate advocate for global health and the first woman in Canada to become dean of medicine.

Hosted by Purdue University College of Veterinary Medicine, the annual Coppoc One Health on-campus conference, free and open to the public, focuses on the symbiotic relationship between veterinary and human medicine and its global impact. In her November 4 speech, Dr. MacDonald described how vaccine reluctance in routine and COVID-19 vaccinations is a growing problem that will need to be addressed over the next decade and beyond. She said a host of factors influence vaccine hesitancy rates in various ways and in various settings. A closer look at these contexts and factors can provide insight into how the problem can be approached in a personalized approach.

Dr. MacDonald emphasized that using evidence to develop strategies to overcome vaccine reluctance is the way forward towards a future of high vaccine acceptance. Strategies to emphasize include addressing subgroups, using the influence of health workers, using effective discussion skills, dealing with pain and fear, facilitating access to vaccines, manage misinformation and talk to peers.

The following summary recaps several of the issues addressed by Dr. MacDonald.

Reluctance to vaccination

Vaccine hesitation is the delayed acceptance or rejection of vaccines despite their availability. The rates and severity of reluctance vary widely and are influenced by a number of factors. Reluctance exists on a spectrum from complete acceptance to complete refusal. Not all people who choose to be vaccinated do so without asking questions or worrying. In high-income countries, about 10-20% of the population should be reluctant to some or all of the vaccines. Meanwhile, only 1-2% will be truly anti-vaccination and fall on the full spectrum refusal side. These hesitation rates vary depending on the time, location and vaccine.

In response to vaccine reluctance and the challenges presented by COVID-19, the World Health Organization and the World Health Assembly have approved the 2030 Immunization Agenda. This strategic plan for equity program emphasizes the importance of leaving no one behind in spreading the benefits of vaccines around the world. . Over the next decade, this plan will be implemented to increase access to vaccines globally and reduce vaccine reluctance through people-centered, country-owned, based strategies. partnerships and data-driven.

“Even before COVID, the World Health Organization declared vaccine reluctance to be one of the ten threats to global health. It’s a big deal, ”said Dr. MacDonald.

Contextual factors

One thing that needs to be addressed in any attempt to reduce vaccine reluctance is that the individual decision on whether or not to get vaccinated is complex and context-specific. People also have certain tendencies and instincts when it comes to information that can either be damaging or be used to benefit vaccine uptake programs. First, people pay more attention to negative information than positive information. People also tend to rely on anecdotal evidence rather than empirical data. When people hear the story of someone they know who has had a bad experience with a vaccine, it stays in their memory. This impact is not easily squashed with spreadsheets and statistics.

The factors that contribute to reluctance have been broken down and categorized in several ways. As Dr. MacDonald said, “There have been a number of models that have been developed to talk about the many, many, many factors that influence your decision to get vaccinated. “A model, known as”Five CSuggests that the main obstacles to vaccine acceptance are:

  1. Complacency
    When the perceived risk is low and other priorities are set higher, people are less likely to take action to get the vaccine.
  2. Confidence
    People need to feel they can trust the vaccine, its delivery, and the decision-makers who need it.
  3. Constraints
    Structural: low availability or high costs can be a major obstacle to vaccination.
    Psychological: Attractiveness, acceptance, social norms and other internal psychological factors have a great effect on reluctance.
  4. Calculation
    The time a person spends gathering in-depth information can determine their acceptance of a vaccine.
  5. Collective response
    The willingness to protect others goes a long way in building uptake of vaccines. People who want to protect those around them are much more likely to get the vaccine than those who only care about themselves.

Dr MacDonald also said that beyond the Five Cs model, other factors that influence vaccine reluctance include politics and health care workers. She noted that when health workers themselves are vaccinated and recommend vaccinations, their patients are much more likely to be vaccinated as well.

Evidence-based strategies

Dr MacDonald said that with such a wide range of influences and varying degrees of reluctance to immunize, it is important to examine evidence-based and efficacy-based reluctance strategies. Many of these strategies exist with a great deal of research to support the techniques.

Detect and address subgroups with low absorption

Some groups of people will be more or less receptive to certain vaccines for many of the reasons discussed above. When addressing these groups, it is essential to take this specific context into account. Dr MacDonald noted that not all people in these groups are strictly anti-vaccination and should not be viewed or treated as such. In order to address these different groups, data is needed. Coverage data can show how many people are unvaccinated or undervaccinated, and where pockets of those people live. Program data shows the efficiency of vaccine distribution. Behavioral and social data reveal barriers to vaccination among certain groups.

Using healthcare workers

The recommendation of a vaccine by a health worker is extremely influential in the decision to accept vaccines. “Educating healthcare workers about vaccines and strategies that work can dramatically increase vaccine uptake,” said Dr. MacDonald.

Use effective discussion techniques

Poorly delivered messages do not have as big an impact as well delivered messages. Even when the content is precise and solid, if the presentation doesn’t convey it, communication will be ineffective. It is also important to remember that high acceptance rates do not indicate that there is no concern about a vaccine. These concerns need to be addressed in well-constructed messages to increase confidence in immunization.

Treat the pain

An element often overlooked when trying to increase vaccine uptake is the pain and needle factor. Dr MacDonald said at least 10-15% of adults fear stings or pain from injections. Others have a much more serious phobia, which can be completely debilitating when it comes to getting the vaccine. Finding ways to reduce the pain and fear associated with vaccines is an important step in reducing hesitation in these people. Decreasing pain will also reduce vaccine stress reactions, such as fainting, headaches, fatigue and nausea, which are often used to reinforce fears and anxiety about vaccines.

Facilitate access

Dr. MacDonald pointed out that studies have shown that when a vaccination is provided by a school, acceptance rates are considerably higher than when the same vaccination is offered by a doctor’s office. Access is facilitated for parents who do not have to coordinate their child’s exit from school and the doctor’s office. For students, acceptance rates are high as it becomes a social norm. Other ways to improve ease of access are to pool vaccines and have more vaccination sites, especially in rural or low-income areas, with extended hours of operation. Meeting the needs of people with disabilities and ensuring people’s privacy are also important factors.

Manage disinformation

Dr MacDonald pointed out that there is a wide range of misinformation and that such misinformation has been shown to significantly reduce vaccine acceptance. Being aware of the strategies and techniques used to disseminate disinformation can help people identify when they are misinformed. It is also important to refute and correct misinformation when it does arise.

Express yourself

Dr. MacDonald concluded her presentation by emphasizing the importance of people speaking out to share accurate information. She explained that fear is powerfully persuasive and that silence is easily misinterpreted as support. Providing information to address peer concerns can make a big difference. Dr. MacDonald pointed out that there is nothing wrong with agreeing to disagree with someone who will not trust the information you give them. But, she said, it’s crucial to stress that there is no scientific debate about the importance of vaccination.

About the Coppoc One Health conference

Established in 2014, the Coppoc One Health Lecture Series is named after Dr Gordon Coppoc, Professor Emeritus of Veterinary Pharmacology at Purdue, and his wife, Harriet. Dr Coppoc is the former head of the Department of Basic Medical Sciences at Purdue Veterinary Medicine. He was also Principal of Indiana University School of Medicine-Lafayette and Associate Dean of Indiana University School of Medicine before retiring in 2014.

Writers):
Hailee Rolofson, PVM communication intern | pvmnews@purdue.edu


Source link

]]>
Using a One Health Approach to Prioritize Zoonotic Diseases in China, 2019 https://surroundhealth.net/using-a-one-health-approach-to-prioritize-zoonotic-diseases-in-china-2019/ Fri, 19 Nov 2021 06:00:00 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/using-a-one-health-approach-to-prioritize-zoonotic-diseases-in-china-2019/ This article was originally published here PLoS One. Nov 19, 2021; 16 (11): e0259706. doi: 10.1371 / journal.pone.0259706. Electronic collection 2021. ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: China is vulnerable to the transmission of zoonotic diseases due to a large agricultural workforce, a large population of domestic livestock, and a highly diverse ecology. To better address this threat, representatives […]]]>

This article was originally published here

PLoS One. Nov 19, 2021; 16 (11): e0259706. doi: 10.1371 / journal.pone.0259706. Electronic collection 2021.

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: China is vulnerable to the transmission of zoonotic diseases due to a large agricultural workforce, a large population of domestic livestock, and a highly diverse ecology. To better address this threat, representatives of the human, animal and environmental health sectors in China organized a One Health Zoonotic Disease Prioritization Workshop (OHZDP) in May 2019 to develop a list of priority zoonotic diseases. for multisectoral collaboration and One Health.

METHODS: Representatives used the OHZDP process, developed by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (US CDC), to prioritize zoonotic diseases for China. The representatives defined the criteria used for prioritization and determined the questions and weights for each individual criterion. A review of English and Chinese literature was conducted prior to the workshop to collect disease-specific information on prevalence, morbidity, mortality and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) in China and the Pacific region. Western Region for zoonotic diseases considered to be priorities.

RESULTS: Thirty zoonotic diseases were assessed for prioritization. The selected criteria included: 1) the risk / severity of the disease (case fatality rate) in humans, 2) the extent and intensity of the epidemic (in humans and animals) in China, 3) economic impact, 4) prevention and control, and 5) social impact. Disease-specific information was obtained from 792 articles (637 in English and 155 in Chinese) and subject matter experts for the prioritization process. Following the discussion of the results of the OHZDP tool among disease experts, five priority zoonotic diseases were identified for China: avian influenza, echinococcosis, rabies, plague and brucellosis.

CONCLUSION: Representatives agreed on a list of five priority zoonotic diseases that can serve as a basis for strengthening the One Health collaboration for disease prevention and control in China; this list was developed before the emergence of SARS-CoV-2 and the COVID-19 pandemic. Next steps focused on establishing a multisectoral coordination mechanism, One Health, improving multisectoral linkages in laboratory testing and surveillance platforms, creating preparedness and response plans multisectoral and increasing the capacity of the workforce.

PMID: 34797849 | DOI: 10.1371 / journal.pone.0259706


Source link

]]>
How Chicago Health Center Leads to Kid Covid Shots https://surroundhealth.net/how-chicago-health-center-leads-to-kid-covid-shots/ Wed, 10 Nov 2021 10:00:00 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/how-chicago-health-center-leads-to-kid-covid-shots/ Gilles Bruce CHICAGO – As the paramedic put on rubber gloves and prepare the syringe, 5-year-old Victoria Macias, wearing a pink Minnie Mouse mask and white lab coat, turned her head and closed her eyes. “It’s not going to hurt, okay?” I’ll hold your hand, I’ll hold your hand, ”said her older sister, 8-year-old Alondra. […]]]>

CHICAGO – As the paramedic put on rubber gloves and prepare the syringe, 5-year-old Victoria Macias, wearing a pink Minnie Mouse mask and white lab coat, turned her head and closed her eyes.

“It’s not going to hurt, okay?” I’ll hold your hand, I’ll hold your hand, ”said her older sister, 8-year-old Alondra. “Breathe deeply, breathe deeply.

Medical assistant Rachel Blancas pushed Victoria’s left arm for about a second. Victoria opened her eyes. And with that, the Macias sisters were among the first children aged 5 to 11 to receive the covid-19 vaccine in the largest city in the Midwest.

Their mother, Maria Lopez, took them out of school early last Thursday to stop at the mass vaccination site on the southwest side of Chicago. “They got all the other vaccines available, so why not this one?” said Lopez, 43, a real estate broker.

Esperanza Health Centers, a nonprofit health care provider that operates the site, has been the primary provider of pediatric covid vaccines in Chicago, according to the city’s public health department, administering about 10,000 vaccines to every 12 to 17 years. Now that the Food and Drug Administration has cleared the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine for children aged 5 to 11, the organization’s efforts may provide lessons to other places in the United States that have struggled to vaccinate. the children.

“People in the community trust us,” said Veronica Flores, covid response manager for Esperanza, which has five medical clinics that see patients regardless of their insurance or immigration status. “When the pandemic started, we were one of the first to do tests. “

At one point, she noted, Esperanza was responsible for more than half of all covid tests performed in the city. The federally licensed health center’s patient population, which is around 90% Hispanic, has doubled as a result of covid.

Everyone who works with patients at Esperanza is bilingual. The vaccination site has extended hours of operation and is open five days a week, including walk-in people. The clinic will even pay for patients’ Uber trips to be vaccinated.

If parents or guardians have any questions or concerns about the pediatric vaccine, Esperanza puts them in touch with one of her doctors.

Pediatric Medical Director Dr Mark Minier seeks to reassure patients that the vaccine, given at a lower dose than for adolescents and adults, has been shown to be both safe and effective for 5-11 years. . Relatively mild side effects can include pain at the injection site, headache, and fatigue that can last for a day or two. In addition, he reminds them that children are at risk from the virus.

“About 2 million children between the ages of 5 and 11 have been diagnosed with covid, and there have been around 170 deaths,” Minier said. “It’s still too much. If we have something that can help prevent death or any sort of morbidity in children from covid, then we should do it. “

Cynthia Galvan, a medical assistant in Esperanza who lives nearby, brought her 10-year-old son, Andres, to be vaccinated on Thursday. She hopes this will guarantee her family a better Thanksgiving than last year, when several of her relatives were sick with covid-19.

“Everyone at home was already vaccinated except him,” said Cynthia, 34. “We are 10.”

Chicago’s vaccination rate of 58.2% for 12 to 17 year olds is higher than the national average by about 50%, largely thanks to the work of community health centers like Esperanza, the health commissioner said. from the city, Dr. Allison Arwady. Not only are they familiar with local languages ​​and cultures, but they’re also the kind of places the whole family is likely to get the shot, starting with grandparents last winter.

“We know that the greatest predictor of a child’s immunization is whether the parent or guardian is immunized,” Arwady said.

She is still worried about the city’s estimated 750,000 residents without covid immunity. Young Black Chicagoans have fallen behind other groups in getting vaccinated, and she fears epidemics could occur this winter among those unvaccinated networks.

“Either way, your immune system is likely to learn its lesson from covid and probably over the next few months,” Arwady said. “So that’s either the safest way to get the vaccine or the risk of getting infected.”

The city is working to increase the immunization rate by offering $ 100 gift cards, giving free in-home vaccines to anyone who wants it, and giving all public school children a day off this Friday to get vaccinated.

Last week, Esperanza Health Centers texted the families of each of its approximately 8,000 patients aged 5 to 11 to let their parents know the vaccine was available. The organization began distributing the injections to the youngest on Wednesday morning, just hours after the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention gave the final green light. They will start giving out second doses in three weeks.

“I hate beating,” said Benicio Decker, 7, as he played a game on an iPad in the clinic’s waiting room on Thursday. “The only time I like shots is when we have an ice cream afterwards.”

But the Chicago sophomore said he was willing to put up with a little discomfort “because I want to protect my family, me, my friends, my teacher.”

During the crisp fall afternoon, families with young children flocked in and out of the site, a 23,000-square-foot former gym with exposed ventilation, overhead fluorescent lights and marble flooring. rubber speckled with blue. As Disney songs played through the speakers, the children stopped to take photos in front of photographic backdrops covered with astronaut-themed balloons that the health center had installed.

“They do a great job of making information available where people are,” said Benicio’s mother, Esmie De Maria, 39. “They have flyers in restaurants, laundromats, the grocery store. They don’t expect people to come to them.

Esperanza has also organized pop-up vaccination clinics in local schools and parks.

De Maria said she had not encountered waiting lists like she had in other places in town. She even asked the health center to teach vaccine workshops to her colleagues at a local neighborhood organization.

Esperanza is a trusted institution in a largely Hispanic part of town, De Maria said – the health center’s name means “hope” in Spanish. In Chicago and across the country, Latinos have been less likely than whites and Asians to be immune to the coronavirus, although that gap has narrowed.

“People of color have every right, historically, to be wary of vaccinations,” said De Maria, noting that many women in his ancestral home in Puerto Rico were forced to be sterilized during the 20th century. . “It’s ingrained in our DNA to be skeptical.”

But she said she hopes everyone will consider getting vaccinated, for the sake of the community. “It’s not just for him,” she said, pointing to Benicio.

At the vaccination station, Blancas, the medical assistant, told Benicio the shot would look like a mosquito bite. “You are really brave. You win this ice cream, ”her mother said.

When Blancas stuck Benicio’s arm with the needle, the boy, holding on tight to his Batman teddy bear, let out a silent “Ouch”. Afterward, he said he just felt a little pinch.

“You’re officially vaccinated,” his mother told him, as he sat down to play with her phone in the observation area for 15 minutes to make sure he didn’t have any dangerous allergic reactions. “He will be one of the first children in his school to be vaccinated. He’s a little superhero.

KHN (Kaiser Health News) is a national newsroom that produces in-depth journalism on health issues. Along with policy analysis and surveys, KHN is one of the three main operational programs of the KFF (Kaiser Family Foundation). KFF is an endowed nonprofit organization that provides information on health issues to the nation.

USE OUR CONTENT

This story may be reposted for free (details).


Source link

]]>
Importance of one health for Covid and future pandemics https://surroundhealth.net/importance-of-one-health-for-covid-and-future-pandemics/ Wed, 03 Nov 2021 16:40:00 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/importance-of-one-health-for-covid-and-future-pandemics/ Today marks the sixth annual One Health Day, a global campaign that highlights the need for a One Health approach to address common health threats by recognizing the interconnection between people, animals and our environment. This approach is more important than ever as we navigate the COVID-19 pandemic. The virus that causes COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2, is […]]]>

Today marks the sixth annual One Health Day, a global campaign that highlights the need for a One Health approach to address common health threats by recognizing the interconnection between people, animals and our environment. This approach is more important than ever as we navigate the COVID-19 pandemic. The virus that causes COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2, is a zoonotic virus, which means it can spread between humans and animals. As more animals are reported infected with the COVID-19 virus, it is becoming increasingly clear that a One Health approach is crucial in addressing new disease threats that affect both humans and animals.

More than 400 animals from 29 countries have been reported infected, including nearly 300 animals in the United States, as well as thousands of mink in mink farms in the United States and abroad. The virus has infected pets, wildlife, zoos, and production animals, including cats, dogs, tigers, lions, gorillas, white-tailed deer, mink, and others. Most of these animals became infected after contact with people with COVID-19. Although animals do not currently appear to play a significant role in the spread of the virus among humans, One Health surveys and animal surveillance are crucial in assessing the transmission of SARS-CoV-2 between humans and animals. This will increase our understanding of the range of animals that can be infected and the risks of potential establishment of new hosts and reservoirs where the virus could hide, mutate and potentially reappear as a new variant in the human population. CDC’s One Health office strives to support One Health activities and improve coordination between sectors. To complement existing public health reporting systems, the CDC has developed a surveillance and reporting infrastructure to help local, state and federal partners capture important laboratory and epidemiological data on SARS-CoV-2 cases in animals linked to people with COVID-19.

One of the lessons learned from COVID-19 is that emerging zoonotic infectious diseases are here to stay and that tackling new disease threats such as COVID-19, Ebola and Zika requires One Health collaboration between health organizations. human, animal and environmental. More information on animals and COVID-19 can be found on the CDC website and more information on CDC One Health’s work is available on the One Health page.

/ CDC press release. This material from the original organization / authors may be ad hoc in nature, edited for clarity, style and length. The views and opinions expressed are those of the author (s). See it in full here.


Source link

]]>
One Earth, One Health: what Prime Minister Narendra Modi said at the G20 summit https://surroundhealth.net/one-earth-one-health-what-prime-minister-narendra-modi-said-at-the-g20-summit/ Sun, 31 Oct 2021 02:50:48 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/one-earth-one-health-what-prime-minister-narendra-modi-said-at-the-g20-summit/ As the leaders of the world’s twenty major economies gathered on Saturday in Rome, Italy for the G20 summitPrime Minister Narendra Modi highlighted India’s fight against the Covid-19 pandemic and said India is preparing to produce more than five billion doses of the Covid-19 vaccine for the world next year . Addressing the session a […]]]>

As the leaders of the world’s twenty major economies gathered on Saturday in Rome, Italy for the G20 summitPrime Minister Narendra Modi highlighted India’s fight against the Covid-19 pandemic and said India is preparing to produce more than five billion doses of the Covid-19 vaccine for the world next year .

Addressing the session a two-day summit focusing on the challenges of climate change, Covid-19 and economic recovery, Prime Minister Modi presented the “One Land, One Health” vision to the world.

“To face such a crisis in the future, this vision can become a huge force in the world,” Prime Minister Modi said.

Prime Minister Narendra Modi with world leaders at the G20 summit in Rome. (Photo PTI)

Speaking about how India has played the role of ‘Pharmacy of the World’, Prime Minister Narendra Modi highlighted how India has delivered drugs to over 150 countries.

“At the same time, we are also putting all our strength into increasing vaccine research and manufacturing,” added PM Modi.

Highlighting India’s fight against the Covid-19 pandemic, the Prime Minister referred to India’s nation-wide vaccination campaign which has successfully delivered over a billion doses of vaccine in not much time.

ALSO READ: Pope Francis meets Prime Minister Modi for the first time and soon accepts invitation to visit India

Prime Minister Modi stressed: “By controlling infection in one sixth of the world’s population, India has also helped make the world a safer place and has also reduced the risk of further mutations of the virus.”

ON THE DIVERSIFICATION OF THE SUPPLY CHAIN

Prime Minister Narendra Modi fought for supply chain diversification during his speech at the G20 summit.

Referring to the disruption caused by Covid-19, Prime Minister Modi said: “The pandemic has alerted the world to the need for reliable supply chains. “

He further pointed out how India has become a reliable manufacturing center in such a situation.

“To do this, India has given new impetus to bold economic reforms. We have significantly reduced the cost of doing business and increased innovation at all levels, ”Prime Minister Modi said at the G20 summit.

“Even in such a critical situation, India’s IT-BPO industry did not let a second stop, working around the clock to support the whole world,” Prime Minister Modi said of the reforms. carried out by India regarding work from all over.

PM Modi called on the G20 countries to make India a trusted partner in their economic recovery and the diversification of their supply chain.

Prime Minister Modi also expressed his joy at the leadership’s appreciation of how India has played the role of “trusted partner”, adding that “it also fills our younger generation with new enthusiasm”.

He further added: “The minimum corporate tax rate of 15% will prove to be an important step in making the global financial architecture ‘fairer’. “

Speaking about the global economic recovery, Prime Minister Modi stressed how essential the international movement and mutual recognition of vaccination certificates is.

“A growing international movement is needed for economic recovery,” Prime Minister Modi said, adding: “For this we need to ensure mutual recognition of vaccine certificates from different countries. “

The Prime Minister further underlined that India has always taken its global obligations seriously.

“I want to tell you all that India is preparing to produce more than 5 billion doses of vaccines for the world next year,” Prime Minister Modi told world leaders at the G20 summit.

He said that India’s commitment would go a long way in preventing Covid-19 infection and stressed the need for Indian vaccines to be recognized by the WHO at the earliest.

READ ALSO: French President Emmanuel Macron tweets in Hindi, Prime Minister Modi returns the gesture


Source link

]]>
Should “One Health” be the government’s priority? https://surroundhealth.net/should-one-health-be-the-governments-priority/ Thu, 21 Oct 2021 09:58:17 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/should-one-health-be-the-governments-priority/ With the human health care infrastructure deeply strained and unable to meet demand, particularly in the context of the additional burden of the COVID-19 pandemic, the broader topic of ‘One Health’ is expected it be a priority? This is an important issue, especially in light of the growing number of global and Indian leaders and […]]]>

With the human health care infrastructure deeply strained and unable to meet demand, particularly in the context of the additional burden of the COVID-19 pandemic, the broader topic of ‘One Health’ is expected it be a priority?

This is an important issue, especially in light of the growing number of global and Indian leaders and institutions urging the need to adopt One Health as a key focus area.

The US CDC describes One Health as “a collaborative, multisectoral and transdisciplinary approach, working at local, regional, national and global levels, with the goal of achieving optimal health outcomes by recognizing the interconnection between people, animals, plants and their shared environment. ”

A One Health approach recognizes that the health and well-being of animals, humans and the environment are deeply and increasingly interdependent, driven by growing population, increasing travel and connections across the planet , and the proximity of human contact with animals and the environment.

Read also: PM Modi inaugurates the 806-bed “Infosys Vishram Sadan Foundation” at AIIMS Jhajjar

These interconnections have led to an increase in chronic zoonotic as well as multifactorial diseases. Compounded by antimicrobial resistance and environmental pollution, tackling these diseases in a holistic manner requires a collaborative approach involving multiple stakeholders and experts among providers and systems in health, public health, forestry, veterinary medicine, the environment and other related disciplines.

Historically, difficult times have fostered increased global collaboration. Over the past few months, we have seen such collaborative partnerships and networks across the world and in India benefit millions of people medically, economically and socially affected by COVID-19. This has helped accelerate the momentum of One Health.

One Health in India, although nascent, is taking more and more root. The government has launched initiatives to tackle issues such as antimicrobial resistance, zoonotic diseases and food security using a One Health approach, which is multidisciplinary in nature, involving interdepartmental work and navigating networks and institutional hierarchies.

This represents a great opportunity to improve and further strengthen this approach and to seamlessly integrate several aspects of the ecosystem and prepare our health systems for the future.

The implementation of one health will need to resolve several priorities, including three key intervention areas: (1) a holistic approach to health care, (2) a strong network of qualified professionals and (3) partnerships and infrastructure.

Holistic health care

Holistic health is becoming increasingly important as the links between different zoonotic, infectious and chronic diseases become clearer, with one disease impacting the risk of vulnerability or complications from others.

In response, therapeutic interventions focus on targeting multiple indications and / or complications. Prevention is increasingly seen as a key priority and a key pillar of holistic health and well-being.

Additionally, we are learning that humans’ relationship with animals and nature in regards to health and well-being is more nuanced than is traditionally thought.

The benefits of animal assisted therapy (AAT) for humans have been well documented not only in companion animals, but also in farm animals.

The use of agricultural farms as a base to promote human mental and physical health in cooperation with health authorities is growing in several countries in Europe and the United States.

In some countries this is called Green care, a concept that is not limited to the use of animals but also includes plants, gardens, forests and the landscape. In India, clinician-led, institutionally strengthened advocacy and support for green care, along with well-coordinated command, can be part of a “green recovery” and increased sustainability of health care.

Read also: ‘Indian Science Triumph’: Prime Minister Modi and Others Celebrate India’s Billion COVID-19 Vaccinations

Qualified professionals

Given the magnitude of the demand posed by the large population, capacity building and capacity building is essential. This requires bringing together a network of qualified and specialized professionals in a wide range of disciplines, such as medicine, veterinary medicine, life sciences, mathematics, physics, chemistry, social sciences, and human sciences. environment, etc.

One Health workers should have both a solid disciplinary background and training to work in multidisciplinary environments. Few countries can cite their interdisciplinary leadership and management training programs and graduates with the same ease as they follow graduates of specific disciplinary programs such as medicine.

It is important to change. One Health education has been successfully integrated into secondary schools in some countries, while many countries offer university and postgraduate level programs. Indian schools and universities should consider incorporating One Health as a curriculum not only in medical courses but also in other programs.

Partnerships and infrastructures

Coordination mechanisms are needed to support One Health approaches, for example working groups and interpersonal relationships that encompass government agencies and jurisdictions, public-private partnerships, networks and community working groups.

These can be based on informal relationships driven by a shared vision, or formal mechanisms governed by laws. The need for coordination also applies to surveillance efforts. For example, we have human and animal disease surveillance programs.

It is worth considering whether these systems could be integrated to help establish a roadmap towards creating a unified One Health surveillance system in the country. A key role of One Health governance is to maintain and nurture long-term relationships. Productive, trustworthy and mutually rewarding partnerships take time to build and require support.

One Health has the potential to drive an ecosystem approach to healthcare, with the various components of the system working in their areas of expertise, respectively, but learning from and collaborating with each other to make available to humans. and animals cohesive health and care solutions.

(The author is Managing Director, Boehringer Ingelheim India.)


Source link

]]>
Workers with unvaccinated spouses will pay more for insurance, health system says https://surroundhealth.net/workers-with-unvaccinated-spouses-will-pay-more-for-insurance-health-system-says/ Wed, 06 Oct 2021 12:06:00 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/workers-with-unvaccinated-spouses-will-pay-more-for-insurance-health-system-says/ Louisiana’s largest healthcare system gives employees choice as it seeks to increase coronavirus vaccinations: make sure your spouse has an injection or face more health insurance costs students. Starting next year, Ochsner Health System employees will see an additional $ 200 per month if their spouse or household partner in the company’s health plan is […]]]>

Louisiana’s largest healthcare system gives employees choice as it seeks to increase coronavirus vaccinations: make sure your spouse has an injection or face more health insurance costs students.

Starting next year, Ochsner Health System employees will see an additional $ 200 per month if their spouse or household partner in the company’s health plan is not vaccinated against the coronavirus, according to a report. letter sent to affected employees last week. The supplement does not apply to beneficiary children covered by the plan.

“These fees are similar to what has been put in place for tobacco users and are in line with the benefits offered by many healthcare organizations and companies,” said Ochsner President and CEO Warner Thomas, in a statement. Thomas said the policy was not a “mandate” because spouses and non-salaried partners can opt for health insurance outside of the company’s plan.

With around 33,000 employees, Ochsner appears to be one of the first large companies in the United States to include spouses and dependent partners in a coronavirus vaccination supplement policy. With doses widely available in the United States and the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine fully approved by the FDA in August, a growing number of companies are shifting their vaccine approach from carrot to stick.

Learn more about the COVID-19 pandemic

Hospital systems across the country, along with major employers such as United Airlines and Tyson Foods, are telling workers to get vaccinated or find new jobs. Other companies, such as Delta Air Lines, did not mandate the shooting but are adding health care supplements for unvaccinated employees.

Self-insured companies like Ochsner are particularly motivated to discourage potentially costly behaviors, including smoking and vaccine refusal, through insurance surcharges.

The average cost of hospitalization for COVID-19, the illness caused by the coronavirus, is $ 20,000, according to a September estimate from the Kaiser Family Foundation. Over the past year, Ochsner has spent “over $ 9 million on COVID care for those covered by our health plans,” Thomas said in a statement to the Washington Post.

According to Linda Forst, professor of environmental sciences and occupational health at the University of Illinois at the Chicago School of Public Health, the mandates and incentives for vaccination have proven to be largely effective, in particularly among groups that initially had high rates of vaccine hesitancy.

“The more comprehensive the requirement, the better for everyone,” Forst said. She expects more information to come to light in the coming months, once Ochsner’s Spouse Supplement kicks in and factors like consumer confidence, employee infection rates and overall employee vaccination rates can be compared between hospitals with and without stricter policies.

Ochsner announced in August that “all of its doctors, contractors and employees” must be fully immunized by October 29, and 82 percent of the company’s employees have complied, Thomas said on a call Wednesday with journalists. Among doctors and business leaders, the rate is around 98%.

The vaccination mandate for employees and the surcharge for unvaccinated dependent spouses allow health and religious exemptions. About 300 employees – less than 1% of Ochsner’s workforce – requested one, Thomas said on the call.

But not all Ochsner employees accept the mandate. On September 20, more than 40 people filed a complaint to block it, partly arguing that it violates medical confidentiality.

Similar objections have been raised in response to President Joe Biden’s vaccination rules. Last month, Biden said all federal employees were to be vaccinated and all businesses with more than 100 employees were to be vaccinated or tested weekly.

Joel Friedman, a law professor at Tulane University who studies discrimination law and employment law, predicted that such lawsuits against private companies “will go nowhere.” Supplements are legal as long as they allow certain exemptions and are capped at a percentage of income. (Ochsner’s will withdraw up to $ 2,400 per year from an employee’s paycheque under the spousal surcharge.)

“People have been required to have vaccines for decades, and there is no right to do whatever you want in this world, free from government interference,” Friedman said. “Try driving an unlicensed car or getting on an airplane without your seat belt on and see what happens.”

He notes that while some employees may view vaccination mandates as onerous, others who do not want to work in an environment with unvaccinated colleagues can accommodate them, and that the requirements may reduce hospital liability.

Forst agreed and said patients would likely feel safer in a hospital with high vaccination rates among staff – and, in Ochsner’s case, their home bubbles as well.

“It makes sense for a healthcare company to run this; these organizations are the ones that take care of others, ”she said.

Louisiana recently had its highest infection rates since the start of the pandemic. The state averages just over 1,000 new cases per day. Just over 45% of the state’s eligible population is fully vaccinated, well below the national average, according to data tracked by The Post.


Source link

]]>
One health, one planet, one future as a theme, the NDTV-Dettol Banega Swasth India campaign goes to season 8 https://surroundhealth.net/one-health-one-planet-one-future-as-a-theme-the-ndtv-dettol-banega-swasth-india-campaign-goes-to-season-8/ Thu, 23 Sep 2021 10:27:11 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/one-health-one-planet-one-future-as-a-theme-the-ndtv-dettol-banega-swasth-india-campaign-goes-to-season-8/ New Delhi: Dettol and NDTV have been working for a clean and healthy India since 2014. This year, the campaign enters its eighth year, with the One Health, One Planet, One Future – Leaving No One Behind program. The campaign notes that the COVID-19 pandemic has made it clear that the health of the country […]]]>

New Delhi: Dettol and NDTV have been working for a clean and healthy India since 2014. This year, the campaign enters its eighth year, with the One Health, One Planet, One Future – Leaving No One Behind program. The campaign notes that the COVID-19 pandemic has made it clear that the health of the country is linked to the health of its people. Either everyone is healthy or no one is. He points out that even the poor health of one person makes everyone vulnerable and at risk.

This year, the campaign’s commitment is to raise awareness of caring for the health of all in India – especially vulnerable communities – the LGBTQ population, indigenous peoples, different tribes of India, ethnic minorities and linguistic, people with disabilities, migrants, geographically distant populations, gender and sexual minorities.

Ravi Bhatnagar, Director, External Affairs and Partnerships, Reckitt says:

You may have better access to health services by 2030. But you and your family can still suffer from the disease. It could have been avoided by better hygiene, it will look hollow and that too will mean more pressure on the public purse. Let us pledge to leave no one behind and to make health care a right, not a privilege.

Learn more about season 8

The commitment to “leave no one behind” is also a fundamental principle of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development – Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). This commitment places equity at the center of national and international political agendas, because if it is not achieved, the set of global goals themselves and their vision of a common future will not be achieved either.

Besides people’s health, season 8 of the campaign will also focus on ecosystem health. The environment is fragile due to human activity, which not only overexploits available resources, but also generates immense pollution through the use and extraction of these resources. The imbalance has also led to immense loss of biodiversity which has caused one of the greatest threats to human survival – climate change. It has now been described as a “code red for humanity”.

Laxman Narasimhan, CEO of Reckitt, says:

The link between public health and the health of the planet affects billions of people today and will soon affect all of our lives as climate change increases the risk of disease. That’s why enabling a healthier planet is at the heart of our goal and runs through everything we do. To protect, heal and nourish people, we must also protect, heal and nourish the natural environment that supports us. Our sustainable development ambitions revolve around three pillars: brands focused on a goal, a healthier planet and a more just society. Partnerships and programs like Dettol Banega Swasth India help us achieve our ambitions.

In addition to the health of individuals and the ecosystem, Season 8 of the Banega Swasth India campaign will focus on 75 years of health, hygiene and nutrition in India, post COVID-19 nutrition, lessons from the COVID-19 pandemic, hygiene and germs, self-care, mental wellness, adolescent health and gender awareness and science and health.

Gaurav Jain, Senior Vice President, South Asia (Health), Reckitt adds:

The health and well-being of our country are paramount. It is our responsibility to understand, analyze and work to solve the problems that will make a real difference. In India, with Dettol Banega Swasth India, we are committed to addressing key health and hygiene challenges to ensure we create a healthier and more prosperous India.

A look at previous seasons of the Banega Swasth India campaign

Directly from season 1, the campaign focused on educating the population on the importance of sanitation, toilets and good handwashing techniques. That year, the campaign raised over Rs 281 crore to build and maintain toilets in Indian villages. Whereas in season 2, the campaign introduced the ‘Swachhata Ki Paathsala‘ with Campaign Ambassador Amitabh Bachchan and created a Hygiene program encourage children to follow good hygiene from an early age.

In season 3, # Mere10Guz initiative was launched with the idea that each individual is responsible for the cleanliness of their immediate environment. In season 4, the campaign focused on clean, compost and sort waste at the individual and political levels.

In season 5, attention shifted to air pollution and the campaign created a clean air program with the help of doctors and experts. In season 6, the campaign shifted from Swachh to Swasth with an emphasis on – only a clean India can be a Healthy india. The main focus areas this season were on healthy mothers, healthy children, and nutrition for everyone. The campaign also organized and distributed a “Swasth Kit” for mothers and infants during the critical 1000 days.

In season 7, the campaign identified the three pillars of a healthy nationhealth, sanitation and hygiene, and environment. In the aftermath of the COVID epidemic, with regular handwashing declared one of the critical steps in tackling the coronavirus, the wheel has come full circle on conversations about best hygiene practices and their life-saving potential. lives, which the Banega Swachh India campaign had advocated from the start.


Source link

]]>
One Health approach and intensified collaboration needed to prevent and respond to pandemics – World https://surroundhealth.net/one-health-approach-and-intensified-collaboration-needed-to-prevent-and-respond-to-pandemics-world/ Sun, 05 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/one-health-approach-and-intensified-collaboration-needed-to-prevent-and-respond-to-pandemics-world/ Speaking as the current Chairman of the Tripartite (FAO, OIE and WHO) For One Health, QU Dongyu calls on G20 countries to step up their coordinated action against COVID-19 at the meeting of health ministers in Rome September 5, 2021, Rome – The world has the opportunity to strengthen collective and collaborative methods to prevent […]]]>

Speaking as the current Chairman of the Tripartite (FAO, OIE and WHO) For One Health, QU Dongyu calls on G20 countries to step up their coordinated action against COVID-19 at the meeting of health ministers in Rome

September 5, 2021, Rome – The world has the opportunity to strengthen collective and collaborative methods to prevent future pandemics through a universal and inclusive approach One Health, QU Dongyu, Director-General of the United Nations for the Food and Agriculture (FAO), said today at the meeting of G20 health ministers held in Rome.

A viable coordinated response to COVID-19 involves intensified collaboration across borders, sectors and disciplines, Qu said at the opening of the two-day meeting.

He praised the efforts of the G20 Presidency – currently held by Italy – “to ensure that we provide new, realistic and pragmatic solutions in the areas of health and agrifood systems, to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals ( SDGs) and achieve Zero Hunger by 2030. “

The Director-General spoke on behalf of FAO and also in his capacity as Chairman of the Tripartite for One Health, a consortium also comprising the World Health Organization (WHO) and the World Organization for Animal Health ( OIE) which advocates solutions that recognize that human health is linked to animal and environmental health – the One Health approach.

The Tripartite considers universality, legitimacy, inclusiveness, coherence and accountability as the five cardinal principles for stronger and more sustainable governance and investment in pandemic preparedness and response, he noted. .

“We are at a historic turning point to implement the measures necessary to prevent future pandemics,” Qu said, highlighting the growing consensus and support of the G20 – whose members represent two-thirds of the world’s population and 85% of the world’s population. value – added economic activity (GDP) – and also the urgent need for more investment, especially at the national level. The Tripartite has proposals on how to quickly fund One Health goals that can contribute to a joint ministerial meeting of G20 finance and health ministers in October 2021, he added.

A coherent approach

The Director-General highlighted the links between agrifood systems and health systems, and noted that the pandemic has disrupted global agrifood systems, which are central to human health and life, in a way that will have serious consequences. long-term impacts.

FAO has responded by designing the COVID-19 response and recovery program and accelerating the implementation of the flagship Hand in Hand initiative, which focuses on Small Island Developing States, Least Developed Countries and landlocked developing countries, all of which have faced challenges over the past year and a half.

The Tripartite helped the G20 develop a call to action for one health, as part of its ongoing development of a global plan of action for one health with advice from its new panel of senior experts. One Health level (OHHLEP).

“Let’s talk the talk,” Qu said in his call to speed up the shift from discussion to practical implementation on the ground.

In the context of One Health, FAO continuously strives to help Members prevent, detect and control diseases and threats to health, wherever they occur. This includes monitoring the emergence of antimicrobial resistance, as well as active animal and zoonotic disease control and eradication programs.

The One Health approach, taking into account the interconnectivity of humans, animals and the environment, is relevant to tackle any threat to agrifood systems and livelihoods. This emphasis is particularly important in rural farming communities where animals provide transportation, fuel and clothing as well as food. Better nutrition, for example, clearly contributes to human health and can be linked to land management and agricultural practices.

“The link between agrifood systems and environmental health, the climate crisis, degradation of ecosystems and loss of biodiversity should also be highlighted,” Qu said.

The G20 meeting

The G20 Health Ministers’ Meeting will feature numerous sessions featuring experts ranging from Peter Doherty, 1996 Nobel Prize Winner in Medicine for his work explaining how the immune system recognizes cells infected with viruses, to the CEO of World Trade Organization (WTO) Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala.

It should, with the participation of the Tripartite, lead to a call to action by the G20 on health to strengthen the resilience of a single health, which will build on the commitments made in terms of equitable access to vaccines and efforts to contain antimicrobial resistance (AMR) taken in the Rome Declaration by G20 health ministers when they meet in May 2021.

Contact

FAO Media Relations Office (+39) 06 570 53625 FAO-Newsroom@fao.org

Christopher Emsden FAO Media Relations (Rome) (+39) 06 570 53291 christopher.emsden@fao.org


Source link

]]>