Health promotion – Surround Health http://surroundhealth.net/ Fri, 26 Nov 2021 07:06:43 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://surroundhealth.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-68-120x120.png Health promotion – Surround Health http://surroundhealth.net/ 32 32 Response to “Inside the health promotion office” https://surroundhealth.net/response-to-inside-the-health-promotion-office/ Mon, 01 Nov 2021 01:50:43 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/response-to-inside-the-health-promotion-office/ Editor’s note: This letter was written in response to an anonymous editorial published last week titled “Inside the Health Promotion Office. For the publisher: We were disappointed that the Campus opening hours October 17 (online) / October 19 (print) The opinion piece “Inside the Health Promotion Office” included misinformation and omitted some of the key […]]]>

Editor’s note: This letter was written in response to an anonymous editorial published last week titled “Inside the Health Promotion Office.

For the publisher:

We were disappointed that the Campus opening hours October 17 (online) / October 19 (print) The opinion piece “Inside the Health Promotion Office” included misinformation and omitted some of the key initiatives the office is engaged in to support our diverse student populations. We would like to underscore our commitment to quality care at University Health Service, clarify the variety of ways we collect and use data to drive our programming efforts, share the strategy behind our initiatives, and highlight some of the programs we offer. currently addressing the various target audiences we serve.

Overall quality of care

At University Health Service (UHS), we continually strive to serve our students in a way that aligns with our core values ​​- caring, respect and excellence. According to our Patient Satisfaction Survey, we are proud to say that approximately 90% of respondents were satisfied or very satisfied with the care they received. This has been consistent across our survey population for over a decade.

For students who have comments to share, we have has created many avenues to do this that are more effective than a Campus opening hours article. We encourage students to consider these options in the future:

  • On our Concerns and praise web page, students will find a feedback form to share their thoughts with us. This can be entered anonymously, or students can request a personal follow-up. Each entry is reviewed by the UHS management team twice a month.
  • If students have a concern that they are not comfortable discussing with their provider, they can contact our Patient advocate.
  • Students who are motivated to truly make a change “from the inside” are encouraged to join the UR Student Health Advisory Committee (URSHAC) or our Peer health advocate (PHA) internship program.

A data-driven approach to programming

As the author noted, the UHS Health Promotion Office (HPO) launched its annual assessment of the American College Health Association – National College Health Assessment (ACHA-NCHA) in February 2020 and received a response rate by 13.9%.

  • A comprehensive marketing plan has been used to promote the survey and included email, print and social media promotion, face-to-face outreach and incentive strategy.
  • This response rate was similar to that of the national cohort of 39,602 respondents who represented 14.1% of students surveyed at all participating institutions in the United States.

However, ACHA-NCHA is not one among many sources that the HPO uses to direct the development of services and programs.

  • Other surveys conducted over the past 18 months include the Coalition on Student Mental Health and Wellness Mental Wellness Survey, Distance Learning Survey, Wellness Survey graduate students and the Active Minds Mental Health Survey.
  • This quantitative data along with the qualitative feedback gathered through URSHAC, the PHA intern team and focus groups are all used to stimulate the development of the programs and services offered by the HPO.

Strategy and framework

The HPO is a small office responsible for health promotion programs for a large population. Therefore, we must be strategic in how we use our resources to have the greatest impact in meeting the varied needs of a diverse student body.

  • Our strategy is guided by the ecological social model, which includes four levels that have an impact on well-being (individual, social, environmental, political). We focus our efforts on some targeted individual programs, as well as strategies that improve campus culture and change social norms.
  • Offering more programs at the individual level for each target audience, as the author suggests, will not have the greatest impact, nor is it achievable without unlimited resources.
  • We also recognize that we do not have the capacity to focus on all health topics for every population, which is why we support, promote and collaborate on programming with our campus partners such as the University Counseling Center, the Burgett Intercultural Center, Title IX Bureau, and International Services Bureau.

Inclusive health promotion programs and services

If the author were to take a closer look at how the HPO supports our diverse student body, especially students with marginalized identities, he will note:

  • Previous programs such as Expiry (a meditation space created for LGBTQ + students), The inner work of racial justice Reading group and a diverse peer support staff from UR Connected. In addition, the Mindfulness for us The program mentioned by the author will continue to be offered to students from the BIPOC community in the coming semesters.
  • The addition of a working group on diversity, equity and inclusion for URSHAC. They will focus on many projects this year, including creating educational materials for transgender students and developing guidelines for providing gender-affirming care.
  • A full-time program coordinator who was hired for BHP earlier this year. One of its main areas of intervention is inclusive health. In this role, she will create targeted programming for Pride and Queer students of color, becoming certified as a Safe Space facilitator, and lead a mandatory one-year LGBTQ + training for all UHS clinical and administrative staff.

Collaboration and constructive feedback

As a member of an educational institution, it is important to encourage students to think critically about topics such as their health care, public health, and inclusive health promotion. We encourage students to participate in an open dialogue that uses constructive means to share their thoughts and opinions. We work hard to create a space where students feel welcome to share their unique perspectives and ideas directly with us. With collaboration, understanding, and grace, we can all work together to create health promotion programs that are truly always better.

Amy McDonald, MS, CHWP
The author is deputy director of health promotion at the University Health Service and a member of the UHS leadership team.

Ralph Manchester, MD
The writer is the Vice-rector and director of the university health service and professor of medicine.


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A digital personal health library to enable precision health promotion to prevent cancers associated with the human papillomavirus https://surroundhealth.net/a-digital-personal-health-library-to-enable-precision-health-promotion-to-prevent-cancers-associated-with-the-human-papillomavirus/ Fri, 29 Oct 2021 06:00:00 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/a-digital-personal-health-library-to-enable-precision-health-promotion-to-prevent-cancers-associated-with-the-human-papillomavirus/ This article was originally published here Health figures before. Jul 21, 2021; 3: 683161. doi: 10.3389 / fdgth.2021.683161. Electronic collection 2021. ABSTRACT The human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common cause of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in the United States. Young, sexually active adults are susceptible to HPV, which accounts for about 50% of new […]]]>

This article was originally published here

Health figures before. Jul 21, 2021; 3: 683161. doi: 10.3389 / fdgth.2021.683161. Electronic collection 2021.

ABSTRACT

The human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common cause of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in the United States. Young, sexually active adults are susceptible to HPV, which accounts for about 50% of new STIs. Oncogenic HPV subtypes 16 and 18 are associated with squamous intraepithelial lesions and cancers and are primarily preventable with prophylactic HPV vaccination. Accordingly, the objectives of this study are to (1) summarize SDoH barriers and their implication for low HPV vaccination rates in young adults (18-26 years old), (2) provide a digital health solution that uses the PHL to collect, integrate and manage sexual and health information, and (3) describe the functionality of the PHL-based application. Through the application of new artificial intelligence techniques, in particular knowledge representation, semantic web and natural language processing, this proposed PHL-based application will compile clinical, biomedical and SDoH data from sources multidimensional. Therefore, this app will provide digital health interventions tailored to the specific needs and capabilities of individuals. The PHL-based app could promote the management and use of personalized digital health information to facilitate precision health promotion, thereby informing health decision-making regarding HPV vaccinations, routine HPV / STI testing, cancer screenings, vaccine safety / efficacy / side effects, and sexual safety. In addition to detecting vaccine reluctance, disparities and perceived barriers, this app could address participants’ specific needs / challenges in health literacy, technical skills, peer influence, education, language, cultural and spiritual beliefs. Precision health promotion focused on improving knowledge-building and information-seeking behaviors, promoting safe sex, increasing HPV vaccinations, and facilitating cancer screening could be effective in preventing cancers associated with HPV.

PMID:34713154 | PMC:PMC8521976 | DO I:10.3389 / fdgth.2021.683161


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Rutgers IFH receives $ 11.6 million to develop Center for Asian Health Promotion and Equity with NYU https://surroundhealth.net/rutgers-ifh-receives-11-6-million-to-develop-center-for-asian-health-promotion-and-equity-with-nyu/ Wed, 27 Oct 2021 05:03:45 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/rutgers-ifh-receives-11-6-million-to-develop-center-for-asian-health-promotion-and-equity-with-nyu/ The Rutgers Institute for Health, Health Care Policy and Aging Research (IFH) recently received $ 11.6 million from the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities to develop the Rutgers-New York University (NYU) Center for Asian Health Promotion and Equity (CAHPE), according to a Press release. XinQi Dong, director of Rutgers IFH and first […]]]>

The Rutgers Institute for Health, Health Care Policy and Aging Research (IFH) recently received $ 11.6 million from the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities to develop the Rutgers-New York University (NYU) Center for Asian Health Promotion and Equity (CAHPE), according to a Press release.

XinQi Dong, director of Rutgers IFH and first distinguished Henry Rutgers professor of population health sciences, said the institute is grateful to receive this clinical research center grant and will use it over the next five. years.

“Of all the grants awarded as a result of this application, our center is the only one focused on health equity in Asia,” he said. “We are particularly excited because this is the first P50 grant awarded to Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences. “

Bei Wu, Dean’s Professor of Global Health and Director of Global Health and Aging Research at NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing, will serve alongside Dong as a Principal Investigator for CAHPE.

Dong said they wanted to create the Center to focus on cardiometabolic disease and mental health issues among Asians in the New Jersey and New York areas. While people don’t generally think Asians are at a higher risk for certain health issues, there are some notable concerns, he said.

For example, Dong said that Asian populations are at high risk for hypertension, diabetes, stroke, depression and suicidal behavior, with New Jersey and New York home to nearly 3 million Americans. Asian origin who might be suffering from these conditions.

“Asian communities in (US) face significant health disparities, especially in the relationship between heart health and mental health,” he said. “Asians are the fastest growing but least studied minority group in (US), but less than 1% of National Institutes for Health research funding over the past 10 years has been focused on Asian populations. “

The Rutgers IFH has a history of partnering with NYU, and both establishments have worked with local Asian populations in the past, he said. CAHPE will use targeted research to focus on managing the relationship between cardiometabolic health and mental health, as well as other disparities.

Specifically, CAHPE’s goal is to develop a central location for scientists to conduct studies on diabetes, stroke, cardiovascular and mental health issues among the region’s Asian population, Dong said. They will also involve community partners and community members in these research projects to make the research more meaningful.

He said the grant was received in late September and the researchers had already started work. The center is based at Rutgers IFH in New Brunswick, and researchers will collaborate significantly with those at NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing.

“The Center aims to build an infrastructure to support research and fund up to 30 research projects over the course of the five-year grant focused on different aspects of the ‘Heart-Spirit’ connection, such as care interventions. nutritional, emotional and related to dementia. Dong said. “Our long-term goal is to share our findings with decision-makers at local, regional and national levels to inform future prevention and intervention strategies. “


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Promoting health in schools at the time of COVID-19: an exploratory survey with principals and teachers https://surroundhealth.net/promoting-health-in-schools-at-the-time-of-covid-19-an-exploratory-survey-with-principals-and-teachers/ Tue, 26 Oct 2021 06:00:00 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/promoting-health-in-schools-at-the-time-of-covid-19-an-exploratory-survey-with-principals-and-teachers/ This article was originally published here Eur J Investig Health Psychol Educ. October 2, 2021; 11 (4): 1181-1204. doi: 10.3390 / ejihpe11040087. ABSTRACT The Coronavirus pandemic has impacted the emotions of the entire school population and upset the organization of the school world. In this context, it is important to reflect on the role of […]]]>

This article was originally published here

Eur J Investig Health Psychol Educ. October 2, 2021; 11 (4): 1181-1204. doi: 10.3390 / ejihpe11040087.

ABSTRACT

The Coronavirus pandemic has impacted the emotions of the entire school population and upset the organization of the school world. In this context, it is important to reflect on the role of school health promotion. The present study aimed to explore the perspectives and experiences of school leaders and teachers on the COVID-19 pandemic and its effects on the school and education system. The first objective was to collect the experience of school leaders concerning the change of school organization, with particular attention to organizational and health promotion aspects. The second was to investigate the perceived health promotion and self-efficacy of teachers in primary, middle and secondary schools. The research was carried out using qualitative (focus groups for school leaders) and quantitative (questionnaires for teachers) methods. The results showed new ways to improve well-being at school and implement health promotion through the sharing of good practices between school leaders. The need for time and space to reflect among school leaders on the pedagogical and didactic aspects of school organization also emerged. The teachers showed a low to medium level of self-efficacy regarding the adoption of strategies related to health promotion; the specifics of each year and level will be discussed.

PMID:34698164 | DO I:10.3390 / ejihpe11040087


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FIFA and Qatar partner with WHO to promote World Cup health https://surroundhealth.net/fifa-and-qatar-partner-with-who-to-promote-world-cup-health/ Mon, 18 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/fifa-and-qatar-partner-with-who-to-promote-world-cup-health/ FIFA and Qatari organizers of next year’s World Cup partnered with the World Health Organization on Monday to use football’s flagship event to promote public health. The move follows years of Qatar’s scrutiny and criticism from conditions for hundreds of thousands of migrant workers needed for massive tournament related projects. “Events like the World Cup […]]]>

FIFA and Qatari organizers of next year’s World Cup partnered with the World Health Organization on Monday to use football’s flagship event to promote public health.

The move follows years of Qatar’s scrutiny and criticism from conditions for hundreds of thousands of migrant workers needed for massive tournament related projects.

“Events like the World Cup and the Olympics are perfect partners in promoting health and solidarity,” said WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus.

When FIFA chose Qatar in 2010 to host the World Cup, the expected health risk was to expose 32 teams of players, thousands of workers and hundreds of thousands of fans to over 40 degrees Celsius (100 degrees Fahrenheit) in June and July.

Although this issue was addressed by moving the games to cooler temperatures in November, the coronavirus pandemic is entering a third year and is getting closer to major tournament preparations.

“The tournament will likely be the first global mass gathering of this magnitude since the spread of the pandemic,” said Hassan al-Thawadi, head of the Qatari World Cup organizing committee at WHO headquarters.

No details were given on Monday on the practical planning to protect the World Cup from COVID-19, and no questions were taken during the launch broadcast from Geneva.

Vaccination warrants for supporters visiting stadiums have been Qatari official policy four months ago. Officials have since moved to a more flexible approach, which is expected to be tested a year before the World Cup when Qatar host the 16 Nations Arab Cup on November 30.

WHO officials on Monday congratulated Qatar and FIFA for their financial and practical contributions.

Qatar was among the “top 10 voluntary donors” last year, said WHO regional director Ahmed Al-Mandhari.

Tedros called the Qatari support “critical for our work” and noted two flights he recently provided to transport medical supplies to Afghanistan.

FIFA donated $ 10 million to WHO last year, and FIFA President Gianni Infantino said in a video message on Monday that the State of Qatar has pledged to organize. the safest World Cup ever “.

The “Healthy World Cup 2022” aims to create a legacy for future major sporting events, including the 2026 tournament which will be hosted by the United States, Canada and Mexico.

The launch included the signing of the great Ivorian Didier Drogba as the WHO Goodwill Ambassador to promote a healthier lifestyle.

“May we come together to be better prepared,” said Drogba, “and respond to future pandemics in a more collaborative way as we seek to tell the WHO story to the global public in languages ​​and platforms accessible to all . “

By GRAHAM DUNBAR AP Sports Writer


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Coercion marks digital health promotion in India https://surroundhealth.net/coercion-marks-digital-health-promotion-in-india/ Sun, 17 Oct 2021 02:40:29 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/coercion-marks-digital-health-promotion-in-india/ On September 27, the Prime Minister launched the Aayushman Bharat (ABDM) digital mission to create a seamless online platform that enables interoperability within the digital health ecosystem. According to the statement of the Prime Minister, “from now on, every citizen receives a health card and his files are digitally protected”. ABDM is the government’s latest […]]]>

On September 27, the Prime Minister launched the Aayushman Bharat (ABDM) digital mission to create a seamless online platform that enables interoperability within the digital health ecosystem.

According to the statement of the Prime Minister, “from now on, every citizen receives a health card and his files are digitally protected”.

ABDM is the government’s latest attempt to digitize service delivery in India as part of its flagship Digital India mission, launched in 2015.

Read also | A jerky start to health reform in Karnataka

The ABDM is the successor to the National Digital Health Mission (NDHM), which was launched by the Prime Minister in August 2020. The introduction of the NDHM (and now ABDM) has raised critical questions about the integrity and security of an individual’s data. , as well as accessibility for marginalized and impoverished communities. It has also raised fears that people without a health card could become targets for exclusion in health matters.

Attempting to answer these questions requires a historical understanding of the government digitization process and how ABDM fits into it. This shows that digitization may be a necessary step to prepare our governance systems for the future, but it is currently hampered by legal, infrastructural and barrier-free obstacles.

The history of the digitization of the public sector dates back to the National Plan for Electronic Governance (NeGP) of 2006. The plan aimed to expand digital infrastructure in remote areas of the country and ensure that government services are easily accessible.

Initially, he focused on governance programs such as banks, land registers, issuance of pensions and passports. With the introduction of the Digital India Mission in 2015, however, the realm of digitization has been broadened to include almost all interactions between the state and citizens such as healthcare, education, and transportation.

Read also | “Vijayanagar facing the challenges of education, malnutrition and health infrastructure”

Meanwhile, examples such as the introduction of Aadhar have highlighted the inadequacies of the conception of digitization as the silver bullet for the delivery of social services nationwide.

The use of Aadhar over the past 10 years has been fraught with privacy, data security and exclusion issues, all of which now apply to the case of ABPM.

No legal framework

In most cases, the digitization of public distribution services has taken place in the absence of a legal framework. Rather, they were carried out primarily through a series of administrative orders with minimal judicial and legislative control. ABPM is no exception.

The government first announced the NDHM policy in the six Union Territories in 2020, then extended ABDM to the whole country, all in the absence of clear laws. The State may refer to the “Health Data Management Policy” to justify such directives. However, a directive cannot replace a law passed by parliament.

It is also important to note that the scope of these digitization measures, which range from the PM-JAY program to the ABDM, has been implemented and extended in the absence of a coherent data protection law in the country. The 2019 law on the protection of personal data is pending before the Joint Parliamentary Committee.

In addition, states such as Delhi and Tamil Nadu have also announced the introduction of health cards for residents of their states in certain jurisdictions; and there is little to no clarity on the relationship between the state and the central maps.

Read also | PCR-on-a-chip test is recommended for the detection of typhus

No informed consent

The health data management policy recognizes that the health ID “requires the express consent of an individual before it can be created.”

However, several reports have indicated that health identifiers are also generated for citizens who have used their Aadhaar card to register for their Covid-19 vaccines on CoWIN. This process appears to have been carried out without prior attempt to inform citizens that the use of aadhar would result in the creation of a health card.

The Ministry of Health and Family Welfare announced in its response to an RTI request submitted by Medianama that as of August 16, 2021 05/11, 42,794 health identifiers had been created through the CoWIN platform. This is in addition to the health identifiers generated in the six territories of the Union.

Inadequate infrastructure

The pandemic has underscored the importance of a health system that is both quality and affordable. The digitization of the health system will play a decisive role here, provided it is based on a robust technological device.

A report by the Department of Electronics and Information Technology titled “Adoption of Electronic Health Records: A Roadmap for India” noted that state hospitals and pharmacies have very little ICT infrastructure and that only a few large public hospitals have computers and connectivity.

Read also | Center establishes “One Health” consortium to monitor bacterial and viral infections

According to the results of another study, in addition to poor infrastructure and poor connectivity, there are also issues related to low spending / budgets for information technology in hospitals. Compared to many countries that spend almost 5% of the total hospital budget on IT, Indian private hospitals typically only spend 2.5% of the total hospital budget on IT. The corresponding proportion is significantly lower in public hospitals.

Data security, data exchange

The government has stressed that the health card is voluntary and that its absence cannot be used as a justification for a failure to provide health services. As was shown during the vaccination campaign, the realities of introducing a new identity card may differ from the required state. For example, although Aadhar is not a mandatory requirement for vaccination, there have been instances where hospitals have refused to accept any form of identification other than Aadhar. The concern, therefore, is that there will be a similar separation in the case of Health ID.

Due to the sensitive and private nature of information associated with Health ID, concerns remain about its security and the extent to which it may be disclosed. The health management policy defines the security measures to be taken when processing this data; Although there have been previous reports of Aadhar data leakage, such measures are far from foolproof, especially when the data is shared by a number of entities.

The directive also allows for the sharing of anonymized health data for research purposes and for the formulation of guidelines.

However, the policy does not identify the appropriate anonymization methods that would be required for such disclosure. This, combined with the lack of a clear framework for handling non-personal data, can create confusion as to the extent to which information is anonymized before it is disclosed.

The Covid-19 pandemic has shown and clarified what role a well-functioning public health system plays in health management.

And while the digitalization of the healthcare system is necessary and can help address some challenges such as transparency, large and bulky patient record keeping, physician access to older patient records, it shouldn’t be. do so at the expense of solving the fundamental challenges of access. to a large part of the population facing affordable and effective health care.

To this end, any attempt at digitization must be very specific, limited in scope and have adequate safeguards to ensure that individuals are not excluded.

And such a process needs to be part of a much larger health strategy that primarily aims to ensure that existing systems are strengthened and improved, rather than being replaced by technology.

(Aman Nair is Policy Officer at the Center for Internet and Society, Pallavi Bedi is Policy Officer at the Center for Internet and Society)

Check out the latest DH videos here:


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Mental health promotion: the facts – ZimEye https://surroundhealth.net/mental-health-promotion-the-facts-zimeye/ Thu, 14 Oct 2021 16:09:18 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/mental-health-promotion-the-facts-zimeye/ Mental Health Promotion: The Facts The World Health Organization’s new Mental Health Atlas paints a disappointing picture of a global failure to provide people with the mental health services they need, at a time when the COVID-19 pandemic is underway. evidence of a growing need for mental health support. The latest edition of the Atlas, […]]]>

Mental Health Promotion: The Facts

The World Health Organization’s new Mental Health Atlas paints a disappointing picture of a global failure to provide people with the mental health services they need, at a time when the COVID-19 pandemic is underway. evidence of a growing need for mental health support.

The latest edition of the Atlas, which includes data from 171 countries, makes it clear that the increased attention to mental health in recent years has not yet resulted in a scaling up of quality mental services that correspond to the needs.

Published every three years, the Atlas is a compilation of data provided by countries around the world on mental health policies, legislation, funding, human resources, availability and use of health services and systems. data gathering. It is also the mechanism for monitoring progress towards achieving the targets of the WHO Comprehensive Plan of Action for Mental Health.

“It is of great concern that, despite the obvious and growing need for mental health services, which has become even more acute during the COVID-19 pandemic, good intentions are not being met with investments,” said Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director General of the World Health Organization.

“We need to heed this red flag and act on it and dramatically accelerate the increase in investment in mental health, because there is no health without mental health. “

Lack of progress in leadership, governance and funding
None of the goals for effective leadership and governance for mental health, the delivery of mental health services in community settings, the promotion and prevention of mental health, and the strengthening of information systems came close. be achieved.

In 2020, only 51% of WHO’s 194 Member States reported that their mental health policy or plan complied with international and regional human rights instruments, well below the target of 80%. And only 52% of countries met the target for mental health promotion and prevention programs, also well below the 80% target. The only target achieved for 2020 was a reduction in the suicide rate by 10%, but even then only 35 countries reported having a stand-alone prevention strategy, policy or plan.

Steady progress, however, was evident in the adoption of mental health policies, plans and laws, as well as in improving the capacity to report on a set of core mental health indicators. However, the percentage of government health budgets spent on mental health has hardly changed in recent years, still hovering around 2%. Moreover, even when policies and plans included estimates of the human and financial resources required, only 39% of responding countries indicated that the necessary human resources had been allocated and 34% that the required financial resources had been provided.

Transfer of care to the community is slow
While systematic decentralization of mental health care to community settings has long been recommended by WHO, only 25% of responding countries met all the criteria for integrating mental health into primary care. While progress has been made in training and supervision in most countries, the supply of drugs for mental health disorders and psychosocial care in primary health care services remains limited.

This is also reflected in the way government funds are allocated to mental health, underscoring the urgent need for deinstitutionalization. Over 70% of total public spending on mental health has been allocated to mental hospitals in middle-income countries, compared to 35% in high-income countries. This indicates that centralized mental hospitals and institutional hospital care still receive more funds than services provided in general hospitals and primary health care centers in many countries.

There was, however, an increase in the percentage of countries reporting that treatment for people with specific mental disorders (psychosis, bipolar disorder and depression) is included in national health insurance or reimbursement schemes – from 73% in 2017 to 80% (or 55% of Member States) in 2020.

Global estimates of people receiving care for specific mental health problems (used as a proxy for mental health care as a whole) have remained below 50%, with a global median of 40% of people with depression and just 29. % of people with psychosis receiving worry.

Mental health promotion increased, but questionable effectiveness
More encouraging was the increase in the number of countries reporting mental health promotion and prevention programs, from 41% of Member States in 2014 to 52% in 2020. However, 31% of total reported programs did not have dedicated human and financial resources, 27% did not have them. have a defined plan, and 39% had no documented evidence of progress and / or impact.

Slight increase in mental health workforce
The global median number of mental health workers per 100,000 population increased slightly from nine workers in 2014 to 13 workers per 100,000 population in 2020.

However, there was a huge variation between countries of different income levels, with the number of mental health workers in high-income countries more than 40 times higher than in low-income countries.

New goals for 2030
The global targets reported in the Mental Health Atlas are taken from the WHO Comprehensive Plan of Action for Mental Health, which contained targets for 2020 approved by the World Health Assembly in 2013. This plan has now been adopted. been extended to 2030 and includes new targets for the inclusion of mental health. health and psychosocial support in emergency preparedness plans, integration of mental health into primary health care and mental health research.

“New data from the Atlas of Mental Health shows us that we still have a very long way to go to ensure that everyone, everywhere, has access to quality mental health care,” said Dévora Kestel. , Director of the Department of Mental Health and Substance Use at WHO. “But I am heartened by the renewed vigor we have seen from governments as the new 2030 goals have been discussed and agreed upon and I am confident that together we can do what is necessary to take small steps. by leaps and bounds over the next 10 years. “

Facebook page: Zimbabwe Online Health Center

E-mail :[email protected]

Twitter: zimonlinehealthcentre
@ zimonlinehealt1

YouTube: Zimbabwe’s online health center

Instagram: Zimonlinehealth

Website: www.zimonlinehealthcentre.co.zw


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Using health promotion to support healthy aging https://surroundhealth.net/using-health-promotion-to-support-healthy-aging/ Mon, 27 Sep 2021 08:43:32 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/using-health-promotion-to-support-healthy-aging/ Lesley Hayes Senior Lecturer in Nursing, School of Health, Science and Wellbeing, Staffordshire University, Stafford, England Christine Helene Cartwright Senior Lecturer in Mental Health, School of Health, Science and Wellbeing, Staffordshire University, Stafford, England Why should you read this article: • Understand the factors that influence the health of the elderly • Learn more about […]]]>
Lesley Hayes Senior Lecturer in Nursing, School of Health, Science and Wellbeing, Staffordshire University, Stafford, England

Christine Helene Cartwright Senior Lecturer in Mental Health, School of Health, Science and Wellbeing, Staffordshire University, Stafford, England


Why should you read this article:

  • Understand the factors that influence the health of the elderly

  • Learn more about the role of health promotion in the health of older people

  • To develop health promotion strategies you can use to support healthy aging

Healthy aging has been defined as the process of developing and maintaining functional capacity which enables well-being in old age. However, as people get older, many will develop chronic illnesses. Therefore, while life expectancy around the world has increased, this does not necessarily translate into a full and healthy life expectancy, with disability and poor health often negatively affecting a person’s end of life. . This article examines the nursing skills required to help older people lead healthy lives amid increasing levels of chronic disease. Nurses have a critical role to play in supporting improvements in the health of older adults by providing targeted solutions such as lifestyle changes, strengthened social networks and increased resilience.

Nursing standard.
do I: 10.7748 / ns.2021.e11693

Peer review

This article has been externally double-blind peer reviewed and checked for plagiarism using automated software

Correspondence

Christine.Cartwright@staffs.ac.uk

Conflict of interest

None declared

Hayes L, Cartwright CH (2021) Using health promotion to support healthy aging. Standard of nursing care. doi: 10.7748 / ns.2021.e11693

Uploaded: September 27, 2021

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Health promotion in schools must be holistic https://surroundhealth.net/health-promotion-in-schools-must-be-holistic/ Fri, 17 Sep 2021 12:23:08 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/health-promotion-in-schools-must-be-holistic/ Dr Eva Neely – We need a more holistic approach to health promotion in schools to empower young people. I was dissatisfied reading literature on youth nutrition, which was often narrow and negative. Young people are always frowned upon, as they do not adhere to the right levels of fruits and vegetables, and they are […]]]>

Dr Eva Neely –

We need a more holistic approach to health promotion in schools to empower young people.

I was dissatisfied reading literature on youth nutrition, which was often narrow and negative.

Young people are always frowned upon, as they do not adhere to the right levels of fruits and vegetables, and they are considered a great risk to our future health. I always had the impression that it was really undermining, very narrow, and that it didn’t really take into account the whole picture.

Beyond physical health

Our strong focus on this physical health lifestyle approach really does impact health in a holistic way. I think a much better approach to looking at health in any population is a more holistic picture, looking at physical, mental, and social health and how these aspects affect each other and how we can approach it. health promotion from a more empowering approach.

My personal interest in nutrition clashed with existing research and wanted to learn more about the significance of diet for social health.

It is not always up to individuals to make the right health choices, and not everyone can.

I watched and talked to teachers and grade 13 students (ages 16-18), exploring students’ daily eating practices, including routines, rituals, and habits.

Filling the knowledge gap

The aim of my article was to fill the knowledge gap by exploring how food rituals act as vehicles for young people to establish, maintain and strengthen social relationships.

In full immersion at school, three to five days a week, I was able to observe the eating habits and decision-making of the students. They discussed typical things that might be of interest to 16-year-olds, from boys to things happening in school to other girls and other groups.

Relationships seem to me to be one of the main things that matter to young people – where they are, who their friends are – because they seem to be their main support during this rather vulnerable time.

These emerged as key elements of their speech. Food emerged in these practices as something quite noticeable at times. For example, if people were in a bad mood or arguing, they did not offer food to that person as a member of the group when they offered food around.

Food rituals

The results include three food rituals highlighted as important for young people in managing their social relationships.

Food rituals have been used to build, maintain and regulate relationships.

Providing food was quite an important thing. There were often girls who had made cupcakes to bring and share with others or who were doing something for someone’s birthday.

These are all really ingrained practices related to their relationships.

Going for a walk for lunch encouraged social interaction and was a way for young people to fit into a new group, and ritualized food sharing involved negotiating the boundaries of friendship.

More research is needed to explore how young people use food rituals in their daily lives to manage social relationships.

Focusing on social relationships in contexts such as schools could broaden the scope of nutrition promotion to promote health in the physical, mental and social dimensions, and have far-reaching implications for promoting health. health at school.

Dr Eva Neely is a lecturer at the Massey School of Public Health. She spent a year in an urban secondary school for girls, observing and interviewing students and teachers on how they use food in everyday life to understand the social significance of food among young people. She was the guest of a weekly “Who Cares?” What’s the point?’ podcast, recently started by Associate Professor Sarb Johal of Massey University School of Psychology. The series is “About the Mind for Thinking People”.

The photo here shows her with her daughter Laurel.


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UMass Public Health Promotion Center COVID-19 Update https://surroundhealth.net/umass-public-health-promotion-center-covid-19-update/ Thu, 09 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/umass-public-health-promotion-center-covid-19-update/ The Public Health Promotion Center (PHPC) is closely monitoring COVID-19 test results. Over the past week, we have seen an increase in positive cases, primarily among students vaccinated off campus. All cases were short-lived, resulting in mild to moderate illness and no hospitalization. The rise in cases mainly affects off-campus students and has been linked […]]]>

The Public Health Promotion Center (PHPC) is closely monitoring COVID-19 test results. Over the past week, we have seen an increase in positive cases, primarily among students vaccinated off campus. All cases were short-lived, resulting in mild to moderate illness and no hospitalization.

The rise in cases mainly affects off-campus students and has been linked to indoor social activities, including visits to crowded downtown bars and attending parties. While there is currently no college ban on students gathering to socialize, we are reinforcing the message to students that masks should be worn at indoor gatherings and although the safest place to be. congregate either outdoors, even there, masks should be worn when social distancing is not possible. The decision was also taken to cancel the student football activities held on campus in Lot 11, next to the McGuirk Alumni Stadium this Saturday. With nearly the entire UMass community vaccinated, wearing a responsible mask and avoiding unmasked crowds indoors are essential additional steps we all need to take to protect ourselves and those around us from revolutionary infections.

In an almost fully vaccinated population like ours, positive test results are mostly groundbreaking cases. Massachusetts’ hospitalization rate among breakthrough cases is only 0.02%, and on our campus, there have been no COVID-related hospitalizations to date. Vaccines work as expected – they prevent serious illness and hospitalizations. While in our planning process we anticipated and prepared for the number of cases in the range we are seeing this week, we are nonetheless concerned about any increase in cases. For this reason, we ask that you continue to do your part to ensure the health and well-being of every member of the UMass community. If we wear our masks indoors, limit contact, and avoid crowded, unmasked indoor gatherings, we will all enjoy a rich and fulfilling semester and avoid some of the more onerous restrictions experienced last year.

Details on the number of cases and vaccinations can be found on the university’s COVID-19 dashboard, which is updated every Thursday.

All members of the campus community must use this COVID-19 symptom review every day before coming to campus. If you’re not feeling well, don’t come to work and get tested. Positive cases may initially present as allergies or a mild cold. Meanwhile, as we maintain vigilance in our efforts to protect public health, the current requirement to hide inside campus will remain in effect indefinitely.

Remember, the actions you take make a big difference! Thank you for continuing to take care of yourself and others.

Truly,

Co-directors of the Center for the Promotion of Public Health (PHPC)

Ann Becker, Director of Public Health
Jeffrey Hescock, Executive Director of Environmental Health and Safety


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