Health promotion – Surround Health http://surroundhealth.net/ Thu, 12 May 2022 18:46:39 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://surroundhealth.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-68-120x120.png Health promotion – Surround Health http://surroundhealth.net/ 32 32 UMass Center for Public Health Promotion COVID-19 Update: May 12 https://surroundhealth.net/umass-center-for-public-health-promotion-covid-19-update-may-12/ Thu, 12 May 2022 18:46:39 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/umass-center-for-public-health-promotion-covid-19-update-may-12/ Dear campus community, At the end of the finals, we congratulate everyone on a successful semester and wish our graduates the best in all their future endeavours. Today we are announcing updates to COVID-19 testing operations on campus. Effective Monday, May 16, the Public Health Promotion Center (PHPC) will move the pickup location for unobserved […]]]>

Dear campus community,

At the end of the finals, we congratulate everyone on a successful semester and wish our graduates the best in all their future endeavours.

Today we are announcing updates to COVID-19 testing operations on campus. Effective Monday, May 16, the Public Health Promotion Center (PHPC) will move the pickup location for unobserved test kits, antigen tests (at home) and KN95 masks to Draper Hall, department headquarters. environmental health and safety. The unobserved PCR testing program is extended through June 30 to serve students, faculty, staff and their household members, as well as university-sponsored visitors. For more information on drop box times and locations, please visit the COVID-19 Testing Program webpage. Meanwhile, the PHPC vaccination clinic has closed for the spring semester and will reopen in early June. To find a nearby COVID-19 vaccine location, you can visit the vaxfinder website.

As the university contemplates start-up activities, the campus is closely monitoring cases of COVID-19. UMass Amherst is fortunate that the campus community is highly immunized and those who test positive have minimal to moderate symptoms of infection, and hospitalizations have remained extremely low. With cases on the rise in Massachusetts and nationally, the university knows its kickoff events draw thousands of people from all over. To protect yourself and others, the campus strongly encourages all graduates and guests to wear face coverings when attending indoor commencement events, regardless of their vaccination status.

The latest COVID-19 testing data for the UMass community from May 4-10 shows 287 new positive cases. The university’s positivity rate is 9.45% compared to 6.91% last week. The state’s seven-day positivity rate is 7.89%. The campus positivity rate for PCR tests (unobserved test kits) this week is 6.4%.

UMass is experiencing similar positive cases at many statewide rates in the Northeast, including Massachusetts. We think it’s important to put the latest positivity rate into context. First, over the past few weeks PHPC has distributed over 22,000 self-testing antigen test kits. More than a third of this week’s positive cases come from such tests. Our case numbers include self-reported positive antigen tests, but do not include negative antigen test results because they are not provided to UMass. Second, voluntary testing has been associated with a high percentage of people reporting symptoms at the time of testing (90%). Due to these factors, the positivity rate has tended to increase.

In this context, it is clear that individuals continue to follow public health best practices: get tested when they show symptoms and report their positive results to the UMass public health team. As noted above, those who test positive have minimal to moderate symptoms of infection and hospitalizations are low. Medical experts are now observing that the effectiveness of measures designed to prevent serious illness and hospitalization, as well as the continued accommodation of vulnerable populations, is more important than traditional case counts in shaping disease guidance. public health. As we approach the third year of the pandemic, it is clear that COVID-19 will be present for the foreseeable future. Importantly, we learned that vaccinations and boosters have been shown to be effective in protecting people from serious illness and hospitalization. At our highly vaccinated UMass Amherst campus, in 2022 the hospitalization rate for the entire community is 0.01% and for those who test positive within our community it is 0.10% . We really appreciate everyone getting vaccinated and staying up to date with their COVID-19 reminders.

We continue to encourage everyone to complete a daily symptom check. If you are sick, stay home and get tested. Be aware that allergy symptoms may resemble those of COVID-19; if in doubt, wear a mask, get tested, and exercise caution until you know the results. If you have been exposed to someone with COVID-19, please wear a mask and get tested on the fifth day after exposure. As a reminder, individuals should continue to report their positive tests to testing@umass.edu. We encourage you to take advantage of our free testing services before leaving campus.

This is PHPC’s last weekly post for the spring semester. We want to thank everyone on campus for their commitment to public health – staying home when sick, getting tested when showing symptoms, and supporting each other as part of our community.

Sincerely,

Co-Directors of the Public Health Promotion Center (PHPC)

Ann Becker, Director of Public Health
Jeffrey Hescock, Executive Director of Environment, Health and Safety

]]>
Government of Canada invests $12.2 million in mental health promotion https://surroundhealth.net/government-of-canada-invests-12-2-million-in-mental-health-promotion/ Fri, 06 May 2022 17:54:00 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/government-of-canada-invests-12-2-million-in-mental-health-promotion/ Government of Canada invests $12.2 million in mental health promotion Canada News Wire WINNIPEG, Manitoba, May 6, 2022 WINNIPEG, MB, May 6, 2022 /CNW/ – Many Canadians struggle with mental health issues, but some people Canada face disproportionate mental health challenges due to racism, discrimination, socio-economic status or social exclusion. The government of Canada remains […]]]>
Government of Canada invests $12.2 million in mental health promotion

Canada News Wire

WINNIPEG, Manitoba, May 6, 2022

WINNIPEG, MB, May 6, 2022 /CNW/ – Many Canadians struggle with mental health issues, but some people Canada face disproportionate mental health challenges due to racism, discrimination, socio-economic status or social exclusion. The government of Canada remains committed to promoting positive mental health for all, recognizing how the COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated the mental health and addictions of many people in Canada.

Today, during Mental Health Week, the Honorable Carolyn Bennett, Minister of Mental Health and Addictions and Associate Minister of Health, announced an investment of $12.2 million for 10 projects across Canada promote mental health and well-being in our communities.

Funding is provided by the Government of from Canada Mental Health Promotion Innovation Fund (MHP-IF). The MHP-IF supports community mental health promotion programs to increase health equity and address the underlying determinants of health. It also supports the development and implementation of culturally-focused mental health programs for the mental health of refugees and new Canadians, First Nations, Inuit and Métis, 2SLGBTQI+, and youth and families.

Promoting mental health leads to individual and population health benefits, including better physical health, faster recovery from illness, healthier behaviors, higher levels of education and employment combined to a reduction in health inequalities.

Estimate

“The last two years have been particularly difficult for all of us. The Mental Health Promotion Innovation Fund supports community-based solutions to promote mental health and address the root causes of poor mental health and mental illness, particularly among Indigenous youth. continue to support projects with a holistic approach to healing by supporting individuals, families and communities. »

The Honorable Carolyn Bennett
Minister of Mental Health and Addictions and Associate Minister of Health

“In these very difficult times (war, COVID, etc.), we are honored to support refugee and newcomer children, young people and their parents. PHAC funding provides the necessary mental health tools and support to improve their chances of integration. in Canadian society.

Margaret von Lau
CEO, Newcomers Employment and Education Development Services (NEEDS) Inc.

Fast facts

  • One in three Canadians will be affected by a mental illness in their lifetime.

  • Community-based mental health promotion projects have the potential to improve health outcomes across the lifespan.

  • Promoting mental health has several health benefits for individuals and the population, including better physical health, faster recovery from illness, healthier behaviors, better educational attainment, and increased employability combined with reduction of health inequalities.

  • The funding announced today was distributed through the Public Health Agency of from Canada Mental Health Promotion Innovation Fund (MHP-IF). More information about the projects can be found here.

  • Through the MHP-IF, the Government of Canada invests $46.3 million from 2019 to 2029 to promote mental health among children, young people and their caregivers.

  • The government of Canada is committed to supporting people in Canada with their mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond. If you or a loved one are having difficulty, you can access the Wellness Together Canada portal, or call 1-866-585-0445 or text WELLNESS to 741741 (adults) or 686868 (youth). The Wellness Together Canada portal offers free access to educational content, self-guided therapy, moderate peer-to-peer support, and one-on-one counseling with trained healthcare professionals.

Related products

Related links

SOURCE Public Health Agency of Canada

]]>
Innovative new program launched to accelerate health promotion in the food industry – Retail Times https://surroundhealth.net/innovative-new-program-launched-to-accelerate-health-promotion-in-the-food-industry-retail-times/ Fri, 29 Apr 2022 06:01:00 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/innovative-new-program-launched-to-accelerate-health-promotion-in-the-food-industry-retail-times/ Eight of the UK’s leading food companies and platforms have joined the first Bite Back 2030 food systems accelerator, each committing to changes to their future strategy to better promote children’s health. Tesco, KFC, Deliveroo, Costa Coffee, Innocent, Danone, Jamie Oliver Group and school caterers, Compass Group have been announced as the first participants in […]]]>

Eight of the UK’s leading food companies and platforms have joined the first Bite Back 2030 food systems accelerator, each committing to changes to their future strategy to better promote children’s health.

Tesco, KFC, Deliveroo, Costa Coffee, Innocent, Danone, Jamie Oliver Group and school caterers, Compass Group have been announced as the first participants in the new scheme, which will see change plans developed to future-proof their business and drive a l renewed focus on improving the safety of our food system in the UK.

Coordinated by the youth-led charity Bite Back 2030, the program will take pairs of senior executives from each company on exploratory workshops to identify, develop and deliver innovative solutions that better protect children’s health and have a positive impact. on the fight against childhood obesity.

Taking a pioneering approach to inspiring business change, young people from the Bite Back movement will be paired with each company, allowing industry leaders to better understand first-hand what younger generations of consumers expect from their products and types of health innovations needed for a more sustainable future. As young activists, they are determined to use their voices and food system experiences to inspire positive change in the corporate sector.

Together, youth and business will create a vision and practical interventions that will help achieve ambitious national goals for the nation’s health. With one in three children aged 11 to 12 currently at risk of developing a diet-related illness, and the government is pushing ahead with new regulations on advertising products high in sugar, salt and raw materials fats, the focus is on industry to take the lead and create the future food systems that protect the health of children and young people.

James Toop, Chief Executive of Bite Back 2030, said: “Every child has the right to access affordable and nutritious food, so I am delighted that these eight organizations are stepping up and committing to lead change. Collectively, they represent the nation’s shopping and eating habits, so it’s incredibly exciting that the tenacious young activists of Bite Back are working with them in collaboration to shape future food systems.

The initiative was partly funded by the Rothschild Foundation, with senior executives expected to receive support from expert Leaders’ Quest facilitators and innovation and evaluation specialists from Nesta.

The Covid-19 pandemic has further highlighted health inequalities across the UK and renewed attention on the role of the food industry in tackling rising rates of childhood obesity and diet-related illnesses.

Emily Yanchuk, co-chair of the Bite Back 2030 National Youth Council, said, “I look forward to participating in the program and sharing the views of other young people on the kinds of changes we want to see to protect our health. On our streets and screens we are faced with a flood of unhealthy food options, so this is a great opportunity to work with some of the biggest brands to bring about positive change and show the importance and power of our voice. . The health of our generation is at stake!

The changes developed by each of the participating companies under the program will be announced at a summit later in the year, and it is hoped that the initiative will become an annual highlight on the agendas of many other food companies.

Jenny Packwood, Corporate Affairs and Sustainability Manager at KFC, said: “This is a really exciting program that we are delighted to be part of. We have a role to play in influencing the food choices available to young people, and this program is a way of working directly with young people to shape our future plans. We’ve been working for years to reformulate our products and add lighter options to our range, but being able to do this in partnership with youth and Bite Back will be even more powerful.

Oonagh Turnbull, Head of Health Campaigns at Tesco, said: “At Tesco we believe passionately that healthy food choices should be available to everyone – whoever they are, wherever they live, whatever their budget. We are proud to be part of the journey with Bite Back, working together to help support the health of families and young people across the UK.

Cathy Port, Food and Beverage Manager for Costa Coffee, UK&I, mentioned: “We are excited to be a part of this program, to work with other industry players and most importantly, Bite Back youth, to help inform our food and beverage strategy. As the nation’s favorite cafe, with the largest footprint, we have a responsibility to families to continue to take positive steps to help provide choice on our menu, providing transparent nutrition information – so everyone can make an informed choice about what they consume. . We look forward to hearing lots of new and innovative ideas from everyone!

Paul Bedford, Policy Director at Deliveroo, said: “Deliveroo’s vision for health is simple: we want to provide the right information and a greater selection of healthier choices on our platform, along with improved navigation to help to find them. Working with Bite Back 2030 will shine a light on healthier options and help us explore new ways to make healthy eating as easy as possible. »

Cath Elliston, Head of Campaigns at Jamie Oliver Group, said: “Young people rightly expect the companies they support to lead the way on the issues that matter to them. We really look forward to working with Bite Back and some of the UK’s leading food brands to improve children’s health and explore opportunities for the future of food.

Giuseppe Battaini, R&I & IPRO Director at Danone UK & Ireland, said: “The scale of the obesity and malnutrition crisis in our country is undeniable. As a food industry, we need to act urgently to tackle these challenges and inspire healthy habits in UK consumers. Health is at the heart of everything we do at Danone, and has been since our beginnings more than a century ago. That’s why we’re excited to be part of the Food Systems Accelerator – we look forward to hearing from young people who are just as passionate about health as we are and to collaborating with others in our industry to spark a real change.

Emilie Stephenson, head of the UK’s Good Force at Innocent, said: ‘At Innocent our aim from day one has been to help ‘people live well and die old’, including providing food and natural and tasty drinks. In the UK, 9 out of 10 children do not eat enough fruit and vegetables, and our products are a way to solve this problem. However, with the FSA program, we can see beyond our company and have the opportunity to make even greater changes to society. Collaborating with different brands on these issues is the only way forward and it goes without saying that we are extremely excited.”

Lisa Priestley, Commercial Director at Chartwells, said: “Our main goal is to fuel the learning of future generations with nutritious and delicious food. Giving voice to young people to help shape and drive this agenda is fundamental to continuously innovating our offering and our operations in pursuit of this goal. We are delighted to partner with Bite Back to further strengthen our focus in this area.

]]>
The role of a resource center in health promotion, prevention and education in times of health crisis https://surroundhealth.net/the-role-of-a-resource-center-in-health-promotion-prevention-and-education-in-times-of-health-crisis/ Fri, 29 Apr 2022 06:00:00 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/the-role-of-a-resource-center-in-health-promotion-prevention-and-education-in-times-of-health-crisis/ This article was originally published here Public health. March 11, 2022; Flight. 33(6):1023-1032. doi: 10.3917/spub.216.1023. ABSTRACT The COVID-19 pandemic outbreak has had massive consequences on healthcare systems. At the same time, the health crisis has caused an overabundance of information. Access to accurate and verified information has become crucial for professionals and the population to […]]]>

This article was originally published here

Public health. March 11, 2022; Flight. 33(6):1023-1032. doi: 10.3917/spub.216.1023.

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic outbreak has had massive consequences on healthcare systems. At the same time, the health crisis has caused an overabundance of information. Access to accurate and verified information has become crucial for professionals and the population to understand the epidemic and preventive measures. In this context, the Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur Regional Health Education Committee (CRES), a resource center for health promotion and education, has played its role as a public health actor by getting involved in knowledge transfer through the creation of 3 tools: a newsletter, a collection of audio recordings and a training program. It has also transformed its usual activities by using digital solutions. This article describes the necessary adaptation to an unprecedented situation by creating new activities and adjusting the usual ones to a complex context. It also shows how these activities were relevant and met the needs of professionals. The results of the evaluation prove that the tools provided were relevant: the need of professionals to access clear and scientifically proven information was satisfied. CRES acted as a key player from the start of the crisis by facilitating access to information. New needs linked to the epidemic have now been identified and now constitute new concrete prospects for CRES’ activities.

PMID:35485004 | DOI: 10.3917/spub.216.1023

]]>
UMass Center for Public Health Promotion COVID-19 Update: April 28 https://surroundhealth.net/umass-center-for-public-health-promotion-covid-19-update-april-28/ Thu, 28 Apr 2022 18:01:26 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/umass-center-for-public-health-promotion-covid-19-update-april-28/ Dear campus community, As of last week, in addition to the unobserved PCR test kits available at the Public Health Promotion Center (PHPC), faculty, staff and students can obtain home antigen test kits free of charge. . Individuals should continue to report their positive tests to testing@umass.edu. The PHPC Immunization Clinic closes today for the […]]]>

Dear campus community,

As of last week, in addition to the unobserved PCR test kits available at the Public Health Promotion Center (PHPC), faculty, staff and students can obtain home antigen test kits free of charge. . Individuals should continue to report their positive tests to testing@umass.edu.

The PHPC Immunization Clinic closes today for the spring semester and will reopen in early June. To help you find a nearby COVID-19 vaccine location, visit the vaxfinder website. Please see the Massachusetts COVID-19 Recall Frequently Asked Questions for more information on eligibility.

We continue to monitor COVID-19 trends in the UMass community through our symptomatic, adaptive, and voluntary testing program as well as sewage monitoring. The latest COVID-19 testing data for the UMass community from April 20-26 shows 132 new positive cases. The university’s positivity rate is 4.73%, down from 4.86% last week. The state’s seven-day positivity rate is 4.87%. Those who test positive continue to report that they have minimal to moderate symptoms of infection, and there is one hospitalization to report. KN95 masks remain available free of charge at the PHPC. We encourage everyone to respect the choices individuals make regarding their own masking.

Please perform a daily symptom check. If you are sick, stay home and get tested. Be aware that allergy symptoms may resemble those of COVID-19; if in doubt, wear a mask, get tested, and exercise caution until you know the results. If you have been exposed to someone with COVID-19, please wear a mask and get tested on the fifth day after exposure.

Thank you for all you do — staying home when you’re sick, getting tested when you have symptoms, and supporting each other as part of our community.

Sincerely,

Co-Directors of the Public Health Promotion Center (PHPC)

Ann Becker, Director of Public Health
Jeffrey Hescock, Executive Director of Environment, Health and Safety

]]>
Health and Wellness Advocacy Launches CBD Poster Campaign https://surroundhealth.net/health-and-wellness-advocacy-launches-cbd-poster-campaign/ Mon, 25 Apr 2022 04:16:24 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/health-and-wellness-advocacy-launches-cbd-poster-campaign/ Jacob Wendler/The North West Daily The posters list the potential risks of cannabidiol, better known as CBD, and are the latest iteration of a cannabis awareness campaign launched by Health Promotion and Wellness in 2019. Walking through the halls of University buildings, North West students are now greeted by posters with a concise message from […]]]>

Jacob Wendler/The North West Daily

The posters list the potential risks of cannabidiol, better known as CBD, and are the latest iteration of a cannabis awareness campaign launched by Health Promotion and Wellness in 2019.

Walking through the halls of University buildings, North West students are now greeted by posters with a concise message from Student Affairs: “Legal is not synonymous with security.

The posters list the potential risks of cannabidiol, better known as CBD, and are the latest iteration of a cannabis awareness campaign launched by Health Promotion and Wellness in 2019.

The office, which focuses on education and support programs related to substance use and other wellness issues, launched the Cannabis Awareness Campaign more than two years ago in anticipation of cannabis legalization in Illinois, according to HPaW Deputy Director Kevin Meier.

Meier said the office started the campaign to help students make informed decisions about cannabis use.

“As with all of the conversations we have about substance use with our college population, we do this through a harm reduction lens,” Meier said. “It’s not the ‘just say no’ message in any way, and it’s just to be realistic, to meet students where they are, and to provide them with the tools to make informed decisions.”

Recreational marijuana became legal in Illinois for adults 21 and older in January 2020, when the Cannabis Regulation and Taxation Act went into effect.

However, while the city council voted in September 2020 to allow the sale of cannabis for recreational purposes, the substance is still prohibited on all NU properties and at university-sponsored events and activities. Because NU receives funding from the federal government, it is required to comply with federal law prohibiting the possession and use of cannabis, including the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act.

While posters around campus remind students that University policy prohibits cannabis use, Meier added that students can contact HPaW to engage in confidential conversations about their substance use or intent to use cannabis.

“We wanted to make sure that people who choose to turn to CBD for whatever reason understand that there is very little research on this substance at this point,” Meier said. “Much remains to be learned about how much CBD actually helps in terms of certain health conditions.”

Lisa Brennan-Winefield, co-owner of Botanica Plant Based Health in Evanston, pushed back on the claim that research on CBD is limited.

Cannabis products are regulated in the United States based on THC levels, Brennan-Winefield said. Any product containing more than 3% THC, the psychoactive component of the plant, is regulated as marijuana. She said some of her clients first saw positive results from using marijuana for anxiety relief, but later found the high THC content exacerbated their condition.

“Because CBD works so differently in everyone, some people see really phenomenal results using it for anxiety, and for some people it (takes away) the edge,” she said.

She also said that Botanica customers often seek out CBD products — which range from products containing only CBD to others that also contain other cannabinoids, such as THC — to relieve conditions such as insomnia, stress and anxiety or chronic pain.

However, Professor Feinberg Richard Miller, who studies pharmacology, said that although more research is emerging on the effects of CBD, the current body of information provides little support for these uses. Some of the perceived positive impacts may be due to the placebo effect, he added.

Miller said that while CBD can often be tolerated in relatively high amounts, the main complications come from excessively high doses or interactions with other medications. If individuals consume CBD products while taking other anti-anxiety medications, CBD can interfere with how the drug is metabolized, leading to potentially toxic levels of the drug, he said. declared.

“There’s not a lot of evidence that cannabidiol does anything good or bad,” Miller said. “But there are a few well-established cases, and maybe you have to keep an open mind.”

E-mail: [email protected]

Twitter: @jacob.wendler

Related stories:

With a global pandemic, presidential election and widespread uncertainty, some college students are turning to CBD to help them manage their stress

Aldermen introduce rule legalizing recreational cannabis

Students are turning to CBD as a potential solution to chronic pain and anxiety

]]>
UMass Center for Public Health Promotion COVID-19 Update: April 14 https://surroundhealth.net/umass-center-for-public-health-promotion-covid-19-update-april-14/ Thu, 14 Apr 2022 17:00:33 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/umass-center-for-public-health-promotion-covid-19-update-april-14/ Dear campus community, The Center for Public Health Promotion continues to offer COVID-19 vaccines to anyone who needs to be vaccinated. A second booster is available to anyone over 50 and some immunocompromised people at least four months after their first booster. These reminders are available Wednesdays from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. and Thursdays […]]]>

Dear campus community,

The Center for Public Health Promotion continues to offer COVID-19 vaccines to anyone who needs to be vaccinated. A second booster is available to anyone over 50 and some immunocompromised people at least four months after their first booster.

These reminders are available Wednesdays from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. and Thursdays from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. until April 30. Walk-ins will be accepted, but we encourage everyone to make an appointment. Please see the Massachusetts COVID-19 Recall Frequently Asked Questions for more information on eligibility.

We continue to monitor COVID-19 trends in the UMass community through our symptomatic, adaptive, and voluntary testing program as well as sewage monitoring. The latest COVID-19 testing data for the UMass community from April 6-12 shows 126 new positive cases. The university’s positivity rate is 3.70%, down from 4.64% last week. The state’s seven-day positivity rate is 3.48%. Those who test positive continue to report that they have minimal to moderate symptoms of infection, and there is one hospitalization to report. With the widespread availability of antigen testing, individuals should continue to report their positive tests to testing@umass.edu.

The CDC announced yesterday that it is extending the national mask mandate for public transportation until May 3, 2022. This federal mandate requires masks on board public transportation, including PVTA buses.

KN95 masks remain available free of charge at the University Center Public Health Promotion Center, and as a community, we encourage everyone to respect the choices individuals make regarding their own masking.

Please perform a daily symptom check. If you are sick, stay home and get tested. Be aware that allergy symptoms may resemble those of COVID-19; if in doubt, wear a mask, get tested, and exercise caution until you know the results. If you have been exposed to someone with COVID-19, please wear a mask and get tested on the fifth day after exposure.

Thank you for all you do — staying home when you’re sick, getting tested when you have symptoms, and supporting each other as part of our community.

Sincerely,

Co-Directors of the Public Health Promotion Center (PHPC)

Ann Becker, Director of Public Health
Jeffrey Hescock, Executive Director of Environment, Health and Safety

]]>
Health Promotion and Education Organize “Reclaiming SEXploration” Workshop | arts and entertainment https://surroundhealth.net/health-promotion-and-education-organize-reclaiming-sexploration-workshop-arts-and-entertainment/ Fri, 08 Apr 2022 13:00:00 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/health-promotion-and-education-organize-reclaiming-sexploration-workshop-arts-and-entertainment/ WMU FIREplace at the Office of Health Promotion and Education. Courtesy of Danielle Snow Western Michigan University Health Promotion and Education hosted a Reclaiming SEXploration online workshop on Friday, April 1 for Sexual Assault Awareness Month. Peer educators shared the importance of consent and respecting each other’s boundaries during sexual interactions. WMU graduate student Jillian […]]]>






WMU FIREplace at the Office of Health Promotion and Education.




Western Michigan University Health Promotion and Education hosted a Reclaiming SEXploration online workshop on Friday, April 1 for Sexual Assault Awareness Month. Peer educators shared the importance of consent and respecting each other’s boundaries during sexual interactions.

WMU graduate student Jillian Palmer started the Zoom meeting by discussing what she hoped the audience would walk away from.

“I would like everyone to come out realizing that there is a difference between sex and intimacy, and even better, that difference can be down to the individual person,” Palmer said.

Palmer encouraged the audience to look at the terms in a broader way.

“(A) great way to kick off the practice of finding our definition of what society has taught us is to think about what experience you’d rather be in,” Palmer said.

Palmer described how to deal with sexual assault triggers by discussing dislikes with your partner.

“Be kind to your mental, physical, and emotional self,” Palmer said.

WMU undergraduate student Lexi Tyler discussed the importance of recognizing consent between individuals.

“If it’s not hell yes, it’s hell no,” Tyler said. “The most important thing is that we want to respect everyone’s boundaries.”

With illustrative assistance, Tyler shared the value of self-respect when setting boundaries.

“We can train ourselves to develop our sense of self-respect by having the consideration of ourselves to say these are the things I need and I’m not willing to compromise,” Tyler said.

Tyler continued, “We make a point of showing each other respect as much as we make a point of showing others that they’re learning to respect us, and what we stand for is that we’re very important in the relationship.”

Using FRIES, an acronym for consent, meaning freely given, reversible, reformed, enthusiastic and specific, Tyler shared how humans are constantly changing and what may be enjoyable one day may be different the next.

“It’s a journey, not something that happens overnight,” Tyler said.

Palmer shared her thoughts on the importance of sexual assault workshops.

“We really think this workshop, in particular, can be a great starting point for the journey of sexual intimacy recovery,” Palmer said.

Tyler added his thoughts on the importance of the workshop during Sexual Assault Awareness Month.

“The kind of conversations we have in this workshop and the workshops throughout Sexual Assault Awareness Month are hard conversations to have, which is even more of a reason we need to have them,” Tyler said.

WMU Health Promotion and Education will host another Reclaiming SEXploration workshop from 5-6:30 p.m. on April 14.

]]>
Research Assistant, Digital Health Promotion job with NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF SINGAPORE https://surroundhealth.net/research-assistant-digital-health-promotion-job-with-national-university-of-singapore/ Wed, 06 Apr 2022 07:00:06 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/research-assistant-digital-health-promotion-job-with-national-university-of-singapore/ job description Applications are invited for the following term position with the Determinants of Physical Activity and Nutrition in Asia (PANDA) Research Group at the Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health Research assistant We are looking for a research assistant to coordinate a project on digital health promotion programs in Singapore. You will be […]]]>

job description

Applications are invited for the following term position with the Determinants of Physical Activity and Nutrition in Asia (PANDA) Research Group at the Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health

Research assistant

We are looking for a research assistant to coordinate a project on digital health promotion programs in Singapore. You will be part of an interdisciplinary research team exploring factors influencing reach and engagement with digital health programs in underserved populations. The position is available for a fixed term (15 months).

Context of the project

Public health research and digital health programs should benefit all members of society. Currently, some of the poorest people who stand to gain the most from these programs are also the least likely to use them. It is therefore critical that we better understand how to reach and engage underserved population segments, including those from lower socioeconomic backgrounds, with digital health promotion programs.

The project takes a data-driven, people-centered approach to understanding what people want and need from digital health programs, what factors influence their participation, and how to reach and engage those who need it most. health behavior support. We aim to generate new experimental knowledge about user preferences, especially those from lower socio-economic backgrounds, to help design, implement and disseminate digital health programs to ensure adoption and uptake. use in a diverse population.

job description

  • Work with the project team to develop project plans, which includes determining requirements, scope, deliverables, budget and timelines.
  • Contribute to research planning by reviewing literature, writing research protocols and assisting with ethics inquiries.
  • Coordinate a team of facilitators to conduct on-site interviews and/or focus groups with members of the public.
  • Manage and analyze research data.
  • Organize team meetings, including preparation of agendas, project updates and note taking.
  • Collaborate with research partners from Singapore-ETH Center and Edith Cowan University (Perth).
  • Contribute to the dissemination of results by preparing reports and scientific articles for submission to high-quality, peer-reviewed journals.

Terms

As a research assistant, you should have experience managing research projects and handling research data. You must be a team player with a positive attitude and good problem-solving skills.

  • Very good written and oral communication skills.
  • Experience conducting research with human participants.
  • Possess strong interpersonal skills with the ability to work with different groups of people.
  • Possess a positive attitude in the face of complex challenges
  • Hold a degree in public health, health promotion or a related discipline. We also welcome applicants from any other discipline with demonstrated ability and interest in contributing to the targeted research areas.

This position offers the candidate an exciting opportunity to work with global experts in digital health and health behavior change. This position will provide the opportunity to work at all levels of research, from establishing research questions to producing high quality research results. In addition, through this research, you will be able to make a significant contribution to the health promotion industry in Singapore.

Recruitment is open immediately and will continue until the position is filled.

For more information or confidential discussion about the role, please contact Dr. Sarah Edney via email: Sarah.Edney@nus.edu.sg

Note that only shortlisted candidates will be contacted.

Qualifications

Hold a degree in public health, health promotion or a related discipline. We also welcome applicants from any other discipline with demonstrated ability and interest in contributing to the targeted research areas.

Covid-19 message

At NUS, the health and safety of our staff and students is one of our top priorities, and the COVID vaccination supports our commitment to keeping our community safe and making NUS as safe and welcoming as possible. . Many of our roles require a significant amount of physical interaction with students/staff/audience members. Even for professional roles that can be performed remotely, there will be instances where on-campus presences will be required.

As per Singapore legal requirements, unvaccinated workers will not be able to work on NUS premises from January 15, 2022. Thus job applicants will need to be fully vaccinated against COVID-19 to gain successful employment with NUS .

]]>
Target metabolic health promotion to optimize maternal and offspring health https://surroundhealth.net/target-metabolic-health-promotion-to-optimize-maternal-and-offspring-health/ Tue, 05 Apr 2022 06:00:00 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/target-metabolic-health-promotion-to-optimize-maternal-and-offspring-health/ This article was originally published here Eur J Endocrinol. April 1, 2022: EJE-21-1046. doi: 10.1530/EJE-21-1046. Online ahead of print. ABSTRACT There is an increase in maternal metabolic load due to the increase in pregnancies complicated by obesity, gestational diabetes, type 2 diabetes and polycystic ovary syndrome. Metabolic dysfunction during pregnancy is associated with increased risks […]]]>

This article was originally published here

Eur J Endocrinol. April 1, 2022: EJE-21-1046. doi: 10.1530/EJE-21-1046. Online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT

There is an increase in maternal metabolic load due to the increase in pregnancies complicated by obesity, gestational diabetes, type 2 diabetes and polycystic ovary syndrome. Metabolic dysfunction during pregnancy is associated with increased risks of long-term morbidity and mortality for women and their offspring. Lifestyle interventions during pregnancy in women at risk for metabolic dysfunction have demonstrated short-term improvements such as reduced gestational weight gain and reduced risk of gestational diabetes. It is not known whether these interventions lead to lasting improvements in the metabolic health of mother and baby. Pharmacological interventions have also shown benefits for both mother and baby during pregnancy, including improvements in glycemic control, reduced gestational weight gain, and a reduction in the number of large-for-gestational-age infants. However, there remains uncertainty about long-term outcomes for mother and child. Existing studies of interventions targeting metabolic health are limited to selected populations in the preconception and postpartum periods and lack follow-up beyond intervention delivery. The COVID-19 pandemic has refocused our attention on the effects poor maternal metabolic health plays in contributing to premature morbidity and mortality. There is an urgent need for strategies to accurately identify the increasing number of females and offspring at risk for long-term adverse metabolic health. Strategies focused on early identification and risk stratification using individualized risk scores in the pre- and interconception periods must be prioritized if we are to target and improve the metabolic health of women and their offspring who are most at risk.

PMID:35380983 | DOI:10.1530/EJE-21-1046

]]>