Adolescent health – Surround Health http://surroundhealth.net/ Wed, 11 May 2022 09:25:06 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://surroundhealth.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-68-120x120.png Adolescent health – Surround Health http://surroundhealth.net/ 32 32 Ghana collaborates to improve adolescent health https://surroundhealth.net/ghana-collaborates-to-improve-adolescent-health/ Wed, 11 May 2022 09:25:06 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/ghana-collaborates-to-improve-adolescent-health/ Ghana is collaborating with five other West African countries in a research project aimed at improving the health and quality of life of women, newborns, children and adolescents in the sub-region. These are Burkina Faso, Côte d’Ivoire, Niger, Sierra Leone and Senegal. The research project, funded by Canada’s International Development Research Center (IDRC), aims to […]]]>

Ghana is collaborating with five other West African countries in a research project aimed at improving the health and quality of life of women, newborns, children and adolescents in the sub-region.

These are Burkina Faso, Côte d’Ivoire, Niger, Sierra Leone and Senegal.

The research project, funded by Canada’s International Development Research Center (IDRC), aims to build capacity for transformative leadership in West Africa to encourage better institutional and governmental use of health research. and scientific evidence to influence policies and interventions in the health sector.

Reduce maternal mortality

This was announced during the opening of a two-day dissemination workshop in Accra for research project teams from the six countries.

The workshop, themed: “Catalysing leadership to improve health outcomes for women, newborns, adolescents and children in West Africa”, is organized by the Ghana Health Service, the Ministry of Ghana Health, Alliance for Reproductive Health Rights, Women Media and Change (WOMEC) and West African Health Organization (WAHO).

Opening the workshop, the Minister of Health, Kwaku Agyeman-Manu, in a speech read on his behalf, said the project aligned with Ghana’s Universal Health Coverage Roadmap 2020-2030 which aimed, among other things, to reduce avoidable risks for mothers, newborns and adolescents. dead in the country.

He said the government was relentless in ensuring that women, newborns, children and adolescent groups have access to the best quality of health services to improve their lives and well-being.

Mr. Agyeman-Manu said this has led to some interventions such as the implementation of the “free maternal health policy” under the national health insurance scheme to expand access to maternal health services for women of childbearing age and the strengthening of the extended vaccination program (PEV).

He said the project has further helped to sustain the national immunization coverage rate of 99.4% to improve the health and well-being of all newborns, infants and children eligible for immunization in Ghana.

Recently, he said that a package of essential health services that would provide a full range of services to all population cohorts using the life course approach had been finalized.

Population

The population of West Africa, the Minister said, is currently estimated at around 420 million with a young population and women, newborns, children and adolescents forming more than half of the total population and an important demographic group for the attention of policy makers. .

He said that beyond the direct causes of preventable illnesses and deaths of these groups, factors such as health system challenges including inadequate equipment and human resources; congestion and lack of beds in health facilities; poor emergency transportation systems, poor wayfinding and communication systems, and lately the COVID -19 pandemic have also been indirect contributing factors.

“Implementing interventions to improve the health and well-being of these groups is important for each country, as well as for the sub-region,” he said.

Canadian support

Canada’s High Commissioner to Ghana, Kati Csaba, said that without improving the health of women, children and adolescents, it would be difficult to achieve the country-led development goals.

“A healthy and prosperous population has a better chance of growing the economy, resisting new shocks and making progress towards the Sustainable Development Goals,” she said.

The health and well-being of women and girls, she said, was a central aspect of Canada’s feminist international assistance policy aimed at eradicating poverty and building a more peaceful, inclusive and prosperous world. , with women and girls at the heart of all policy and program decisions. .

teenage pregnancy

Vera Karikari Bediako, senior program officer at the Ministry of Gender, Children and Social Welfare, said the ministry had developed a five-year national gender policy to mainstream gender equality issues into the national development process.

The policy document, Ms. Bediako said, is currently being revised and updated to address bottlenecks and barriers in various sectors regarding inequalities.

To ensure a coordinated response in tackling teenage pregnancy in Ghana, she said the ministry had also developed a five-year strategic plan and a strategic implementation plan that would help identify areas where interventions need to be strengthened. or modified.

“This has become necessary due to the increasing number of teenage pregnancies and their negative impact on the health and socio-economic well-being of young people, especially adolescent girls,” she said.

The Director General of the West African Health Organization (WAHO), Stanley Okolo, expressed the hope that the workshop would facilitate the exchange of project results, lessons learned and how to scale up the results in the 15 ECOWAS countries to achieve their goals. Goals.

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Consultant pediatrician interested in adolescent health at Somerset NHS Foundation Trust https://surroundhealth.net/consultant-pediatrician-interested-in-adolescent-health-at-somerset-nhs-foundation-trust/ Sun, 08 May 2022 19:49:33 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/consultant-pediatrician-interested-in-adolescent-health-at-somerset-nhs-foundation-trust/ job summary This position will allow for the expansion of our current adolescent service with the successful candidate joining our current Senior Pediatrician with a specialist interest in adolescent care. Experience or interest in developing as a pediatrician caring for young people with eating disorders and other physical and mental health issues requiring close liaison […]]]>

job summary

This position will allow for the expansion of our current adolescent service with the successful candidate joining our current Senior Pediatrician with a specialist interest in adolescent care.

Experience or interest in developing as a pediatrician caring for young people with eating disorders and other physical and mental health issues requiring close liaison with CAMHS and social service colleagues is essential . Cohesive teamwork and a flexible approach to meeting the needs of our young people is highly valued at Somerset Foundation Trust, an integrated trust and winners of the HSJ Mental Health Trust of the Year 2021. There is scope to develop further aspects of adolescent care that may be of interest to the successful candidate.

There are 9 scheduled activities available for this position, although applications for part-time work are welcome. The successful candidate will join the acute general pediatrics team of 14 consultants offering days of general pediatrics service with a 1:12 hour on-call commitment. There will be general pediatric outpatient engagements on top of that.

Main duties of the position

Our current pediatric service operates with consultant coverage in a “hot week” style on an ongoing basis. This includes 1h12 consulting out of hours from 5pm to 10pm (resident) and on call at night 1h12. There will also be shifts on the Pediatric Assessment Unit (PAU) x 10 per year Admissions during the day are managed by a separate PAU consultant, while the “hot week” consultant manages the service.

The incumbent will provide outpatient services including a general pediatric clinic, an eating disorder clinic and an integrative adolescent clinic. The job holder will also contribute to regular backup clinics, providing assessments of physical backup issues. This work is well supported by supervision and peer review.

The incumbent will provide regular review of patients of their caseload who are hospitalized, direct their management and attend PCTs.

The position is made up of 9 PAs distributed from Monday to Thursday. Part-time work opportunities are available upon discussion.

About Us

It is important that the successful candidate shares the department’s commitment to clinical service excellence and the policy of continuously developing innovative service delivery and high quality training for all staff.

You will be approachable, proactive and able to advise and support your colleagues, junior doctors and members of the multidisciplinary team. The successful candidate will be able to work with a variety of professionals and participate fully as a member of a team working to develop and expand the pediatric service. In addition to taking care of young people and their families, we are looking for someone who will take care of themselves and the rest of the team they work with.

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Global child and adolescent health targets under threat without urgent and comprehensive reform https://surroundhealth.net/global-child-and-adolescent-health-targets-under-threat-without-urgent-and-comprehensive-reform/ Sun, 08 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/global-child-and-adolescent-health-targets-under-threat-without-urgent-and-comprehensive-reform/ Despite recent progress, the world is on track to miss its child and adolescent health goals, with more than 8.6 million deaths expected in 2019. According to a new Lancet series, children and adolescents need comprehensive and coordinated care from conception to adulthood. For all the latest news, follow the Daily Star’s Google News channel. […]]]>

Despite recent progress, the world is on track to miss its child and adolescent health goals, with more than 8.6 million deaths expected in 2019. According to a new Lancet series, children and adolescents need comprehensive and coordinated care from conception to adulthood.

For all the latest news, follow the Daily Star’s Google News channel.

Despite recent progress, the world is on track to miss its child and adolescent health goals, with more than 8.6 million deaths expected in 2019. According to a new Lancet series, children and adolescents need comprehensive and coordinated care from conception to adulthood. They also show how the COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted economies and social systems, undermining recent progress towards achieving the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and increasing children’s vulnerability to violence, abuse and to mental health problems.

Children and families have faced many challenges during the COVID-19 pandemic, highlighting the urgent need to transform the global child and adolescent health agenda. With less than eight years to go, many child and adolescent health goals are off track. We urgently need a holistic approach that supports children and their families from conception through early adulthood to improve health outcomes, economies and society. Indicators of human capital and country progress include mortality rates in the first five years of life. But this indicator only covers one aspect of child development.

Instead, the authors of the series examined the conditions of survival, growth, disability and education in different regions of the world and their effects on the crucial stages of life, from the third trimester of pregnancy to 20 years. In this age group, there were 8.6 million deaths in 2019. Of these deaths, 1.9 million (23%) were stillbirths and 2.4 million (28%) were neonatal deaths. In addition, 2.75 million (32%) children died between one month and five years of age. Among older child and adolescent deaths, 506,000 (6%) occurred in ages five to nine, 368,000 (4%) in ages 10 to 14, and 595,000 (7%) in ages 15. -19 years old.

Interventions should be scaled up and continued through early childhood and adolescence through school-based and community-based delivery platforms, where children and families can have consistent access to immunization and screening programs to treat often overlooked areas of child health such as anemia, vision, dental care. non-communicable diseases, neglected tropical diseases and mental health issues (including anxiety and depression).

An analysis of data from 95 national surveys in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) confirms that vast economic inequalities persist both between and within countries, with strong links between early poverty and health, nutrition and cognitive development of children and adolescents. .

Among the countries included in the analysis, children at the bottom of the wealth ladder had at least double the risk of health problems linked to early poverty, such as infant mortality, stunting, of development, teenage motherhood and incomplete primary schooling. school compared to children at the top of the wealth scale. In addition, the extent of inequality in child mortality, nutrition, and development was positively associated with the degree of economic inequality.

However, as pandemic recovery programs are developed, policymakers have an unprecedented opportunity to strengthen existing poverty reduction policies and create new multisectoral programs that will work with health and social interventions. nutrition to offset the impact of the pandemic on women and children.

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Adolescent health outcomes: associations with child maltreatment and peer victimization | BMC Public Health https://surroundhealth.net/adolescent-health-outcomes-associations-with-child-maltreatment-and-peer-victimization-bmc-public-health/ Fri, 06 May 2022 12:26:52 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/adolescent-health-outcomes-associations-with-child-maltreatment-and-peer-victimization-bmc-public-health/ Data and sample The current study involved a province-representative sample of adolescents from the 2014 Ontario Child Health Study (OCHS). [33]. This study of children ages four to 17 was conducted in Ontario, Canada; the questionnaires were administered by Statistics Canada. A total of 10,802 children from 6,537 households participated (response = 50.8%) [33]. The […]]]>

Data and sample

The current study involved a province-representative sample of adolescents from the 2014 Ontario Child Health Study (OCHS). [33]. This study of children ages four to 17 was conducted in Ontario, Canada; the questionnaires were administered by Statistics Canada. A total of 10,802 children from 6,537 households participated (response = 50.8%) [33]. The sample for this study was restricted to a subset of adolescents aged 14 to 17, including the selected child and his siblings, who completed individual questionnaires on a laptop computer (not= 2910). Ethical approval for the original investigation was granted by the Hamilton Integrated Research Ethics Board at McMaster University. Further details of the OCHS 2014 methods have been reported previously. [33].

Measures

child abuse

Exposure to child maltreatment included measurement of physical abuse, sexual abuse, emotional abuse, physical neglect, and EIPV. Physical abuse, sexual abuse, and EIPV were assessed using items adapted from the Childhood Experiences of Violence Questionnaire (CEVQ), which produces valid and reliable scores. [34]while items on emotional abuse and physical neglect were drawn from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health [35]. For each item, respondents were asked to think about things that could have happened “at any time in their childhood”. Physical abuse was assessed with three items asking how often they were (a) slapped in the face, head or ears or hit or spanked with something hard by an adult, (b) pushed, grabbed, shoved or had something thrown at them by an adult, or (c) been kicked, bitten, punched, burned or physically assaulted by an adult. Sexual abuse was assessed with two items asking how often an adult (a) forced or attempted to force the respondent into unwanted sexual activity with threats or physical violence, or (b) touched the respondent against her will in any sexual way. Emotional abuse was assessed with an item asking how often parents/guardians said things that hurt the respondent’s feelings or made them feel unwanted or unloved. Physical neglect was assessed with an item asking how often parents/guardians failed to take care of the respondent’s basic needs (eg, keeping them clean, providing food or clothing). Finally, the EIPV was assessed with two items asking how often the respondent saw or heard parents/guardians (a) say hurtful or mean things to each other or to another adult at home or (b) hitting or hitting another adult at home. The response options for each item were: ‘Never’, ‘1-2 times’, ‘3-5 times’, ‘6-10 times’ and ‘More than 10 times’. Each type of CD was coded separately according to the cut-offs used previously, which varied according to the severity and frequency of each element. [34]. Specifically, physical abuse required a response of three or more times to one or both of the first two items and/or a response of at least once to the third item; sexual abuse required a response of at least once to one or both items; emotional abuse required a response of six or more times to the single item; physical neglect required a single-item response at least once; and EIPV required a response of six or more times to the first item and/or three or more times to the second item. Finally, the five types of MC were then combined into a dichotomous measure of any lifetime MC.

Peer victimization

PV was measured using the School Crime Supplement of the National Crime Victimization Survey [36]. Respondents who had attended school for at least one month since September 2014 were asked how many times during the current school year had another student: ‘made fun of you, called you names or insulted”, “spread rumors about you”, “threatened you”, “pushed, shoved, tripped or spat on you”, “tried to make you do things that you didn’t mean to do, for example, gave them money or other things”, “purposely excluded you from activities”, “purposely destroyed your property”, “posted hurtful information about you on the Internet”, “threatened or insulted you by e-mail, instant messaging, text message or online game”, “deliberately excluded you from an online community”, or “insulted or insulted you at school in connection with your race, religion, ethnicity or national origin”, “…any disability you may have” or “…your gold sexual orientation”. Although not often included, recent research has shown that discriminatory PV is common among adolescents [28] and is associated with poorer mental health [37]. The response options for each item were: “Never”, “Once or twice this school year”, “Once or twice this month”, “Once or twice this week”, and “Almost every day”. Consistent with previous research, responses were dichotomized into “once or twice this month” or more often versus “never” or “once or twice this school year.” [38]. All items were then combined into a dichotomous measure of any PV from the previous month.

Cumulative exposure

The two dichotomous variables for lifetime exposure to MC and exposure to PV in the previous month were summed into a cumulative exposure variable. However, rather than simply looking at a number of exposures (0, 1, 2), we separated those who reported exposure to CM only versus PV only, resulting in a categorical variable with four mutually exclusive: no CM or PV, CM only, PV only, and both CM and PV.

Nonsuicidal self-harm and suicidality

The adolescents were asked about NSSI and suicidal ideation with the following questions: “During the past 12 months, have you ever deliberately harmed yourself without intending to kill yourself? and “In the past 12 months, have you ever seriously considered killing yourself or killing yourself?” “. Response options were “yes” or “no”. Those who responded affirmatively to this last item regarding suicidal ideation were then asked about suicide plans and attempts in the past year with the following questions: “During the past 12 months, have you plan on how you would kill yourself or commit suicide? ” (response options: “yes” or “no”) and “How many times have you actually tried to kill yourself or kill yourself? which included the response options “Never”, “Once” and “More than once”” and were coded as “once or more” as opposed to “never” due to limited cell sizes .

Mental disorders

The 2014 OCHS Emotional Behavioral Scales (OCHS-EBS) checklist, which has demonstrated its validity and reliability [39], assessed six mental health disorders: generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), separation anxiety disorder (SAD), social phobia (SP), major depressive disorder (MDD), oppositional defiant disorder (ODD), and pipes (TC). Teenagers were asked to self-report symptoms of each disorder experienced in the past six months (e.g., “I worry a lot.”) with response options: “Never or not true”, “Sometimes or rather true” and “Often or very true. Responses were assigned a score of zero to two, respectively, and summed into an overall score for each disorder (with symptoms of GAD, SAD, and SP combined in any anxiety disorder). Use an existing approach to create binary classifications [39]each score was dichotomized using cutoffs informed by global prevalence estimates: any anxiety disorder (6.5%), MDD (2.6%), ODD (3.6%), and CD (2. 1%) [40]. Anxiety and MDD were combined into a single variable indicating the presence of one or both internalizing disorders and TOP and CD were combined into a single variable indicating the presence of one or both internalizing disorders. ‘externalization. Finally, internalizing and externalizing disorders were combined as a dichotomous variable of any mental health disorder.

Physical health status

Long-term physical health problems self-reported by adolescents and diagnosed by a medical professional included allergies, bronchitis, diabetes, heart problems/diseases, epilepsy, cerebral palsy, kidney problems/diseases, asthma or any other long-term health problem. A single dichotomous indicator of any state of physical health was created.

Covariates

Teen’s sex (male, female), age (14-17), ethnicity (white, non-white/multi-ethnicity), parent/guardian-reported household income (less than $25,000, $25,000 to $49,999, $50,000-$74,999, $75,000-$99,999, $100,000 or more), single-parent household status (yes, no) based on demographic information collected from parent/guardian, and urbanity (large urban, small-medium urban and rural) based on current census population counts were included.

Data analysis

First, the socio-demographic characteristics describing the sample were calculated. Second, weighted prevalence estimates of CM, PV, and each outcome were calculated for the total sample and by gender. Gender differences were tested with unadjusted logistic regression analysis with men as the reference group. Third, the prevalence of each outcome by CM and PV exposure was calculated, stratified by sex. Fourth, a series of nested sequential logistic regression models adjusted for sociodemographic characteristics (i.e. gender and in the total sample. Model 1 assessed CM, Model 2 assessed PV, Model 3 included both CM and PV, and Model 4 tested the interaction between CM and PV. Models with statistically significant interaction terms were then examined using plots of prevalence data for each variable of outcome by presence or absence of CM and stratified by presence or absence of PV Finally, cumulative effects were examined by testing the association between the variable CM/PV at four mutually exclusive levels (no CM or PV, CM only, PV only, both CM and PV) and each result using logistic regression adjustment for all covariates (including gender) in the entire sample without exposure to CM or PV as a group reference . Differences between each exposure category were then examined by sequentially changing the reference category in each regression model. After reviewing the data, it was determined that due to small cell sizes, cumulative effects stratified by sex could not be examined. Bootstrap weights (Fay adjustment: 0.8) calculated by Statistics Canada were applied to all analyzes to ensure that the results were representative of the target population and to produce valid variance estimates. Statistical significance was set at p<0.05.

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Senior Lecturer, Community Child and Adolescent Health Nursing at CURTIN UNIVERSITY https://surroundhealth.net/senior-lecturer-community-child-and-adolescent-health-nursing-at-curtin-university/ Wed, 04 May 2022 03:06:58 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/senior-lecturer-community-child-and-adolescent-health-nursing-at-curtin-university/ $125,937 – $144,971 (ANS) plus 17% superannuation Permanent position – full-time position Teaching and research role Position reference: 883317 About Us Curtin’s School of Nursing is the oldest established nursing school in the Australian university sector. Since its opening 47 years ago, the school has been a key part of the […]]]>

  • $125,937 – $144,971 (ANS) plus 17% superannuation
  • Permanent position – full-time position
  • Teaching and research role

Position reference: 883317

About Us

Curtin’s School of Nursing is the oldest established nursing school in the Australian university sector. Since its opening 47 years ago, the school has been a key part of the University’s drive to be a leader in health sciences education and research. The school offers a range of undergraduate courses in nursing, oral health therapy and paramedicine; and specialized postgraduate courses in areas ranging from diabetes and critical care to child health and midwifery.

the Child and Youth Health Service (CAHS) is proud to be the leading provider of children’s healthcare services in Western Australia, as the only health service in the state dedicated to infants, children and young people. CAHS is made up of four service areas: neonatology, community health, child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS) and Perth Children’s Hospital (PCH). Comprised of more than 5,500 employees, our services are offered at PCH and King Edward Memorial Hospital (KEMH), as well as through a network of more than 160 community clinics across the metropolitan area.

In this role, you will

In this specialist role, you will be responsible for leading, promoting, translating and implementing nursing research to support priorities and strategic imperatives in CAHS Community Health. This position will inform and support the evidence-based community health nursing practice offered to infants, children, adolescents and families in this health setting. The successful candidate will ideally have a keen interest in the interface between community health nursing and the social determinants of health; population health; and primary care, health promotion and prevention in children and adolescents.

  • To provide high quality and innovative education to undergraduate and postgraduate students in a range of modes and levels.
  • Arrange tutorials, hands-on classes, demonstrations, workshops, student field trips, clinical sessions, and/or studio sessions, as appropriate, that stimulate and promote student learning.
  • Act as course coordinator.
  • Supervise higher level research students
  • Conduct impactful and translational national and international research
  • Develop a coherent research program in collaboration with the Child and Youth Health Service (CAHS)
  • Provide leadership and build research capacity, in a range of projects with Child and Youth Health Service (CAHS)
  • Actively seek out and act as co-investigator or lead investigator in applications for competitive research grants and/or fellowships.
  • Disseminate and publish research results in journals, seminars, workshops and conferences
  • Be involved in and lead research groups and committees both at Curtin and the Child and Youth Health Service (CAHS)

Why choose Courtin?

  • Curtin continues to be a leader in reconciliation in the higher education sector, being one of the first universities to receive accreditation for an Elevate RAP – the highest level of the workplace RAP framework. of Reconciliation Australia.
  • The University was recently named one of Australia’s Inclusive Employers for 2019-2020 by the Diversity Council of Australia (DCA)
  • A major global player, with well-integrated campuses in Singapore, Malaysia, Mauritius and Dubai.

For more information about Curtin and all of our benefits, visit https://about.curtin.edu.au/jobs/

We are looking for someone with

  • A doctoral degree in a relevant discipline.
  • Proven high level teaching skills with a demonstrated reflective approach to teaching.
  • Significant contribution to scholarship in teaching and experience in curriculum development and unit/course coordination.
  • An established record of research output/creative work in high quality academic journals/outlets compatible with the discipline.
  • Evidence of an established national reputation and growing international profile and history of obtaining research income, including nationally competitive research grants and/or fellowships.
  • Demonstrated leadership skills with the ability to lead significant curriculum and/or research initiatives, provide mentorship to less experienced staff, and supervise HDR students.
  • Demonstrated high-level communication and interpersonal skills with the ability to foster the development of a collegial and supportive work environment and the ability to interact with students and staff with cross-cultural sensitivity.
  • Demonstrated commitment to applying relevant and applicable policies, procedures and laws in the day-to-day performance of the duties of this position.

Work requirements

  • Prior to appointment, the recommended candidate(s) will be required to have an up-to-date criminal record check in accordance with the University’s National Police Certificate Assessment Procedures.

COVID 19 – Vaccination policy

Applicants should note that Curtin University has implemented a COVID-19 Vaccination Policy and Procedures which covers all staff, students, campuses and activities, effective February 21, 2022.

If you are invited to attend the next stage of assessments, you may be required to provide proof of your COVID-19 vaccination status, including your booster if eligible (or a waiver formally granted) upon arrival, and if on offers you a position with Curtin, you will be required to provide proof of your COVID-19 vaccination or exemption status before you begin work.

Next steps

Please apply online with a cover letter meeting the specific selection criteria and a CV to enable us to assess your suitability for the position.

Closing of applications: 10:00 p.m. Wednesday, June 1, 2022

Contact details

If you have any questions regarding the requirements of this role, please contact:

Tracey Moroney – Head of School, Curtin School of Nursing on tracey.moroney@curtin.edu.au

Inclusion and Diversity at Curtin

We are committed to ensuring that Curtin has an inclusive, harassment-free environment in which all students, staff, and community feel respected, valued, and welcome.

We encourage applications from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, people with disabilities, women and people from diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds, and are committed to making reasonable adjustments to enable people with disabilities to participate fully. to our recruitment, selection and appointment processes.

We have been recognized in this area:

  • Voted one of Australia’s Inclusive Employers for 2019-2020 (Diversity Council of Australia).
  • Became one of the first universities to receive accreditation for a High Reconciliation Action Plan.
  • Achieved Athena Swan Bronze accreditation (2018-2022).
  • Voted 16th best place to work for new dads in Australia (HBF – Direct Advice for Dads, 2019).

Warning

Curtin reserves the right, in its sole discretion, to withdraw from the recruitment process, not to book appointments or to nominate by invitation, at any time. We reserve the right to withdraw the advertisement before the date indicated on the advertisement.

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The influence of a school social network intervention on adolescent health behaviors: an agent-based and gender-specific model https://surroundhealth.net/the-influence-of-a-school-social-network-intervention-on-adolescent-health-behaviors-an-agent-based-and-gender-specific-model/ Thu, 21 Apr 2022 06:00:00 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/the-influence-of-a-school-social-network-intervention-on-adolescent-health-behaviors-an-agent-based-and-gender-specific-model/ This article was originally published here Before Public Health. 4 Apr 2022;10:861743. doi: 10.3389/fpubh.2022.861743. eCollection 2022. ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Adolescence is a crucial stage for the development of health behaviors, which is associated with health in adulthood. School closures caused by the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic have put adolescents at increased risk of obesity due […]]]>

This article was originally published here

Before Public Health. 4 Apr 2022;10:861743. doi: 10.3389/fpubh.2022.861743. eCollection 2022.

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Adolescence is a crucial stage for the development of health behaviors, which is associated with health in adulthood. School closures caused by the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic have put adolescents at increased risk of obesity due to a lack of physical activity. Although social media interventions are an effective approach to promoting health-related behaviors, current practices overlook gender differences in adolescent behavioral patterns and emotional preferences. The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of gender-context-embedded centrality-based methods in a social network intervention to improve adolescent health behavior.

METHODS: We developed an agent-based model (ABM) that supports the small-world characteristics of adolescent social networks. Data relating to the health of middle school students (not = 234, 48% girls) were collected in November 2018, 2019 and 2020 in Tianjin, China. We simulated several network-based interventions with different criteria for influential agents (i.e. betweenness centrality, proximity centrality, eigenvector centrality and PageRank) and a random condition . The rules for generating peer influence and accelerating behavior change were based on the theory of the diffusion of innovations, with gender specifications.

RESULTS: After the school closures, there was a significant increase in the prevalence of overweight and obesity among adolescents, with a greater increase in girls than in boys (+8.85% versus +1 .65%, p < 0.001). The simulations showed that the centrality-based network interventions were more efficient than the random condition (average of 6.17% per tick versus 5.22% per tick, p < 0.05), with higher efficiency in girls than in boys (average 3.68% vs 2.99% per tick, p < 0.05). PageRank outperformed the other centrality conditions at the population level (6.37% per tick, p < 0.05). In girls, intermediate centrality was the best method (3.85% per tick, p < 0.05), while in boys, PageRank still had the highest efficiency (3.21% per tick, p < 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS: We found evidence of gender differences in the negative impact of COVID-19-related school closures and the potential for centrality-based social network interventions to affect adolescent health behavior. Therefore, we emphasize the importance of gender-specific targeting strategies to further promote health-related school programs in the post-pandemic era.

PMID:35444977 | PMC: PMC9013940 | DOI:10.3389/fpubh.2022.861743

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Launch of an online training course on adolescent health https://surroundhealth.net/launch-of-an-online-training-course-on-adolescent-health/ Wed, 30 Mar 2022 18:02:13 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/launch-of-an-online-training-course-on-adolescent-health/ The Department of Education (DepEd) has launched an online training for the Basic Adolescent Health Course to train its staff in adolescent development and services for adolescent learners. The four-day foundational course for Adolescent Reproductive Health (ARH) Focal Points from various school divisions and regional county representatives will run through April 2022. The training will […]]]>

The Department of Education (DepEd) has launched an online training for the Basic Adolescent Health Course to train its staff in adolescent development and services for adolescent learners.

The four-day foundational course for Adolescent Reproductive Health (ARH) Focal Points from various school divisions and regional county representatives will run through April 2022.

The training will also be rolled out to schools between April and December 2022.

DepEd has partnered with the Ministry of Health and the Philippines Country Office of the World Health Organization, with technical assistance from the Society of Adolescent Medicine Inc., Plan International Philippines and the United Nations United States for International Development, to deliver the program to stakeholders.

Lope Santos 3rd, director of the DepEd Bureau of Learner Support Services-School Health Division, said adolescent health training will guide its health staff, as well as teaching and non-teaching staff, to be prepared for the challenges. teens needing help “no matter the circumstances.”

The Department for Education said the activity will also enable primary care providers to support learners as they transition from childhood to adulthood – physically and mentally – amid a life shaped by the Covid-19 pandemic to become independent individuals.

Secretary of Health Francisco Duque 3e also expressed his support for DepEd for this partnership and thanked the partners who helped make the foundational adolescent health training course possible.

“We must also be careful and nurturing of our adolescent population, especially with the Covid-19 pandemic. Shaped by virtues of their own, we must ensure that they grow up independently and aware of the environment in which they live. they live,” Duque said.

ARH Education supports DepEd’s commitment to Republic Act 10354, or the “Responsible Parenting and Reproductive Health Act of 2012.”

This law obligates the institution to provide sustainable, age-appropriate and developmentally appropriate education and training for reproductive health educators to create inclusive and integrated education for responsible parenting and reproductive health in a learning formal, informal and indigenous.

It is also one of the flagship programs of Oplan Kalusugan sa DepEd which focuses on providing health and nutrition programs to basic education learners.

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Basic Adolescent Health Training Course Rolled Out by DepEd, Partners – Manila Bulletin https://surroundhealth.net/basic-adolescent-health-training-course-rolled-out-by-deped-partners-manila-bulletin/ Sun, 27 Mar 2022 06:56:00 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/basic-adolescent-health-training-course-rolled-out-by-deped-partners-manila-bulletin/ To train teaching and non-teaching staff in adolescent development and services for adolescent learners, the Department of Education (DepEd) has launched online training for the Basic Adolescent Health Course. (Photo by DepEd) DepEd, through the Bureau of Learner Support Services-School Health Division (BLSS-SHD), in partnership with the Department of Health (DOH) and the Philippines Country […]]]>

To train teaching and non-teaching staff in adolescent development and services for adolescent learners, the Department of Education (DepEd) has launched online training for the Basic Adolescent Health Course.

(Photo by DepEd)

DepEd, through the Bureau of Learner Support Services-School Health Division (BLSS-SHD), in partnership with the Department of Health (DOH) and the Philippines Country Office of the World Health Organization Health (WHO) for the initiative.

“DepEd health staff, our teachers and non-teaching staff, who are our first responders in schools, must always be ready to deal with adolescents who need help, whatever the circumstances,” said the Director of BLSS-SHD, Lope B. Santos III.

The training aims to build the capacity of DepEd teaching and non-teaching staff in adolescent development and services for adolescent learners.

The Society of Adolescent Medicine, Inc. (SAMPI), Plan International Philippines, and the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) also provided technical assistance to DepEd.

The four-day basic course is first delivered to all Adolescent Reproductive Health (ARS) Focal Points from various school divisions and regional representatives across the country from January to April 2022.

DepEd said thereafter the training will be rolled out to schools between April and December 2022.

The activity coincided with the celebration of this year’s International Adolescent Health Week from March 20-26.

One of the aims of the activity was to enable primary care providers to “support learners in their transition from childhood to adulthood, physically and mentally, in the midst of a life shaped by a pandemic for to become independent individuals”, in line with this year’s theme.

(Photo by DepEd)

ARH Education supports DepEd’s commitment under RA 10354 or the Responsible Parenthood and Reproductive Health Act 2012.

It mandates the institution to provide sustainable, age-appropriate and developmentally appropriate education and training for educators to create inclusive responsible parenting and reproductive health education integrated into formal, informal and native.

Adolescent reproductive health is one of the flagship programs of the “Oplan Kalusugan sa DepEd” which is the convergence of its school health and nutrition programs.

Other programs under “OK sa DepEd” are WASH in Schools, National Drug Education Program, School Feeding Program, School Mental Health, and Medical, Dental and nurses.

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Nigeria renews commitments to improve adolescent health towards achieving Universal Health Coverage (UHC) https://surroundhealth.net/nigeria-renews-commitments-to-improve-adolescent-health-towards-achieving-universal-health-coverage-uhc/ Fri, 25 Mar 2022 12:39:55 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/nigeria-renews-commitments-to-improve-adolescent-health-towards-achieving-universal-health-coverage-uhc/ Download logo Nigeria’s Minister of Health, Dr Osagie Ehanire, said that to make progress on Universal Health Coverage (UHC), the country recognizes the need to keep adolescents at the center of all programmes, focusing on their health and development. To ensure that “no adolescent or young person is left behind”, the ministry will continue to […]]]>
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Nigeria’s Minister of Health, Dr Osagie Ehanire, said that to make progress on Universal Health Coverage (UHC), the country recognizes the need to keep adolescents at the center of all programmes, focusing on their health and development.

To ensure that “no adolescent or young person is left behind”, the ministry will continue to work with all partners and stakeholders to meet the needs of different categories of adolescents and young people who are at different levels of vulnerability,” said the Minister of Health. , Dr Osagie Ehanire during the commemoration of National/International Adolescent Health Week (IAHW) 2022 in Abuja.

According to the minister, “we therefore advocate and make every effort to strengthen the effective coordination of the adolescent health program nationwide” while urging all partners to replicate the same structure in their respective states to ensure the continued provision of essential gender-responsive services and to mitigate barriers faced by adolescents and young people in accessing services in the country.

The IAHW is a week-long participatory event commemorated globally and annually the third week of March, aimed at celebrating young people with the aim of working collectively to improve the health and well-being of adolescents. worldwide. The theme for this year 2022 is “Transitions: Building a Case for Adolescent Visibility in Nigeria while Transitioning from a Pre-Pandemic to a Pandemic-Shaped Life”.

To mark the previous turbulent week, a teenage lawyer, Isabella Anani, noted that teenagers are the leaders of today and tomorrow and should be treated as such. For her, it is an accomplishment to have an entire week devoted to adolescent health and well-being.

She however called on the government and stakeholders to provide support for adolescents, stressing that “adolescent health cannot be underestimated. We must be prepared – physically, mentally and psychologically. There should be a cohesive effort from parents, guardians, teachers and government to ensure that we successfully move to the next stage which comes with great responsibility, decision making and character building for a greater nation.

Adolescents constitute a significant proportion (22%) of the total population of Nigeria. Progress towards achieving the Sustainable Development Goals and UHC requires improving the health and well-being of adolescents through appropriate investments and effective coordination at all levels.

The National Demographics and Health Survey (NDHS 2018) shows that 19% of adolescent girls are mothers and pregnant with their first child, 32% do not attend antenatal care (ANC) and 66% give birth unsupervised by skilled birth attendants and an HIV prevalence of 1.9 million which shows a strong gender disparity among young people. This is compounded by the impact of the Covid 19 pandemic on our already fragile healthcare system.

Reiterating WHO’s commitment to the well-being of adolescents in Nigeria, the Country Representative, Dr. Walter Kazadi Mulombo, emphasized that the needs of adolescents in the peri-covid era are unique and diverse.

“WHO will progressively strengthen its work in the area of ​​adolescent health, expanding its portfolio of research, norms and standards, country support and advocacy, and expanding the scope of work in line with WHO guidance. ‘Accelerated Action for Adolescent Health (AA-HA) to address the multifaceted needs of the global adolescent population,’ WR said.

He noted that the National PHC Summit to be held later in the week is also an opportunity to galvanize multisectoral action for adolescent health and wellbeing.

He urged stakeholders to redouble their commitments to ensure adolescent health remains high on the global agenda for a healthier future.

Distributed by APO Group on behalf of the World Health Organization (WHO) – Nigeria.

This press release was issued by APO. Content is not vetted by the African Business editorial team and none of the content has been checked or validated by our editorial teams, proofreaders or fact checkers. The issuer is solely responsible for the content of this announcement.

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Development and Validation of Adolescent Health Literacy Assessments: A Rasch Measurement Model Approach https://surroundhealth.net/development-and-validation-of-adolescent-health-literacy-assessments-a-rasch-measurement-model-approach/ Fri, 25 Mar 2022 06:00:00 +0000 https://surroundhealth.net/development-and-validation-of-adolescent-health-literacy-assessments-a-rasch-measurement-model-approach/ This article was originally published here BMC Public Health. 2022 Mar 25;22(1):585. doi: 10.1186/s12889-022-12924-4. ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: Health literacy (HL) is implicated in improving decision-making and health promotion, and in reducing racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic disparities in health. The three main domains of HL include functional, interactive, and critical HL. HL skills develop throughout life as […]]]>

This article was originally published here

BMC Public Health. 2022 Mar 25;22(1):585. doi: 10.1186/s12889-022-12924-4.

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Health literacy (HL) is implicated in improving decision-making and health promotion, and in reducing racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic disparities in health. The three main domains of HL include functional, interactive, and critical HL. HL skills develop throughout life as individuals’ psychosocial and cognitive abilities develop and they accumulate experiences with navigating health systems. Although adolescence is marked by increased involvement in health decision-making, most studies and measurements of HL have focused on adults. The literature on HL in adults and adolescents is also limited by the lack of validated test-based measures to assess HL. Existing validated, test-based LH measures for adolescents were originally designed for adults. However, adolescents are at an earlier stage of developing their LH skills (eg, fewer experiences navigating the healthcare system) than adults, and measures originally designed for adults may assume prior knowledge that adolescents may lack, thereby underestimating adolescent HL. This study developed and validated test-based assessments of adolescent functional, interactive, and critical HL.

METHODS: Items were generated in an iterative process: focus groups with adolescents informed about item content, cognitive interviews with adolescents, and expert consultation established the content and face validity of the initial items, and items have been revised or deleted where appropriate. Secondary students (n = 355) completed a battery of measures including the revised HL items. Items were assessed and validated using Rasch measurement models.

RESULTS: The final 6-item functional, 10-item interactive, and 7-item critical assessments and their composite (23 items) correspond to their respective Rasch models. Item-level invariance was established for gender (male vs. female), age (12-15 vs. 16-18), and ethnicity across all assessments. The ratings had good convergent validity with an established measure of functional LH, and ratings scores were positively related to reading instructions before taking medication and questioning the veracity of health information found online.

CONCLUSIONS: These assessments are the first interactive and critical LH test-based measures of adolescents, the first functional LH test-based measure designed for adolescents, and the first composite assessment based on tests of the three major domains of HL. These assessments should be used to inform strategies for improving adolescent health, decision-making, and behaviors.

PMID:35331182 | DOI:10.1186/s12889-022-12924-4

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